More Alternative History

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Tobacco use in southeastern North America could date back 4,000 years, or about 1,500 years earlier than previously thought, according to new research.

archaeology.org/news/6725-180615-alabama-nicotine-pipe

(Troy University)
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Tobacco use in southeastern North America could date back 4,000 years, or about 1,500 years earlier than previously thought, according to new research.

archaeology.org/news/6725-180615-alabama-nicotine-pipe

(Troy University)

 

Comment on Facebook

The discovery could be used also to find out if current assumptions of dangers or health related effects were the same as then.

Siegrun Maas

I thought actual cured tobacco from a much earlier date came out of a glacier in a woven bag? There were seeds, they got DNA. It was only published a few months ago. I think it was thousands of years older from my imperfect memory.

Archaeologists have discovered an imperial Roman villa on the banks of the Tiber River near the Milvian Bridge in northern Rome (pictured).

archaeology.org/news/6724-180615-rome-imperial-villa

(Anthony Majanlahti, via Wikimedia Commons)
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Archaeologists have discovered an imperial Roman villa on the banks of the Tiber River near the Milvian Bridge in northern Rome (pictured). 

archaeology.org/news/6724-180615-rome-imperial-villa

(Anthony Majanlahti, via Wikimedia Commons)

 

Comment on Facebook

Odd place to discover a Roman Villa?

The Milvian bridge is a nothing except for one thing. It is where Constantine 'the Great' fought a great battle when he marched on Rome with his Gallic legions, and made Christianity the official religion of Rome. Because of the 'Miracle' at the Milvian bridge, the battle is credited with making Rome Christian. Good reason to site your villa there, if you have an imperial or Christian story to tell about yourself.

Siegrun Maas

What will be left of America after Republicans destroy it? Concentration camps?

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8 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

Words and letters carved into a 7th-century slate window ledge have been discovered by archaeologists excavating at Cornwall's famed Tintagel Castle.

archaeology.org/news/6726-180615-england-tintagel-inscription

(© English Heritage / Emily Whitfield-Wicks)
(© English Heritage/Christopher Ison)
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Words and letters carved into a 7th-century slate window ledge have been discovered by archaeologists excavating at Cornwalls famed Tintagel Castle. 

archaeology.org/news/6726-180615-england-tintagel-inscription

(© English Heritage / Emily Whitfield-Wicks)
(© English Heritage/Christopher Ison)Image attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

"'He who is valiant and pure of spirit... may find the Holy Grail... in the Castle of Aaaaargh”

Bored child having been sent to his room.

Arthur wasn’t here!

Mankind has always exhibited a penchant for leaving his personal mark...just one more example.

Medieval graffiti?

Carl Thorpe is this a recently discovered find?

"(insert name) was here"

Tintagel!!!!

Arthur woz ere?

I decoded it and basically it says. 'Merlin is a cracker head !' !

Felicity Taylor

Siegrun Maas

Hayley Emma Goundry

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#OTD in 1682, William Penn founded Philadelphia, which, in addition to a political and cultural capital, became a center of grand gardens and the emerging science of botany.

archaeology.org/issues/289-1803/features/6457-gardens-philadelphia-botanical

archaeology.org/issues/134-1405/letter-from/1965-letter-from-philadelphia-batrams-garden

(Wikimedia Commons)
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#OTD in 1682, William Penn founded Philadelphia, which, in addition to a political and cultural capital, became a center of grand gardens and the emerging science of botany. 

archaeology.org/issues/289-1803/features/6457-gardens-philadelphia-botanical

archaeology.org/issues/134-1405/letter-from/1965-letter-from-philadelphia-batrams-garden

(Wikimedia Commons)

10 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

At Pompeii, a wealth of ancient material, including fragments of frescoes, broken artifacts, and architectural decorations disregarded by previous excavators, has been discovered by archaeologists.

archaeology.org/issues/304-1807/from-the-trenches/6696-trenches-pompeii-new-discoveries

(Courtesy Soprintendenza Archeologica di Pompei)
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At Pompeii, a wealth of ancient material, including fragments of frescoes, broken artifacts, and architectural decorations disregarded by previous excavators, has been discovered by archaeologists.

archaeology.org/issues/304-1807/from-the-trenches/6696-trenches-pompeii-new-discoveries

(Courtesy Soprintendenza Archeologica di Pompei)

 

Comment on Facebook

That was old school archaeology just keep the good stuff and chuck the fragments in the dump pit.

Rachel Lamberti show Tony Lamberti this! Super cool

wow

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10 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

Sans-Souci was a royal palace of Henry Christophe, who founded a kingdom in northern Haiti in 1811.

To read more about discoveries from around the world, subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

To read online articles from the July/August 2018 issue, go to archaeology.org/issues

(Courtesy J. Cameron Monroe)
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Sans-Souci was a royal palace of Henry Christophe, who founded a kingdom in northern Haiti in 1811.

To read more about discoveries from around the world, subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

To read online articles from the July/August 2018 issue, go to archaeology.org/issues

(Courtesy J. Cameron Monroe)

 

Comment on Facebook

I thought it was a beer... 😝

San Souci is a neighborhood on the outskirts of town here, was a vacation destination 100 years ago, a run down rough place now

Must be the only thing worth seeing there

Sans souci = without care. Was undoubtedly beautiful!

Am zing

Cap Lab

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Five lead mirror frames dating to the 3rd century A.D. were found at the site of a Roman villa in northern Bulgaria.

archaeology.org/issues/304-1807/from-the-trenches/6697-trenches-bulgaria-roman-villa-mirror-frames

(Bulphoto Agency)
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Five lead mirror frames dating to the 3rd century A.D. were found at the site of a Roman villa in northern Bulgaria.

archaeology.org/issues/304-1807/from-the-trenches/6697-trenches-bulgaria-roman-villa-mirror-frames

(Bulphoto Agency)

 

Comment on Facebook

They found the home of Narcissus.

Wonder if the kids back then wished their names were called when a lady looked into it....

They were never used as actual mirrors- they are votive mirrors and small enough to fit in ones palm with a glass surface as small as a coin!!! They are usually found in female burials and bear inscriptions wishing the soul a good afterlife!!

That villa was maybe used by light women selling their body...or a mirror depo.

They lead whom? Where does it lead? Who takes the lead?

Katie Shead these are bubble blowers

All broken.... 35 years of bad luck. Contemporary with the destruction of the villa? 😉

Five together..maybe the carrier was trying to sell them

so lovely

Siegrun Maas

Nicolette Bambalova

Love this.

Jack Tilson

Caitlin Moore

Max La

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A chapel devoted to the god Osiris at the temple complex of Karnak in Luxor, Egypt, believed to date to the 7th century B.C. is being studied by archaeologists.

archaeology.org/issues/304-1807/from-the-trenches/6698-trenches-egypt-luxor-karnak-osiris-chapel

(Courtesy Essam Nagy/Egypt Exploration Society)
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A chapel devoted to the god Osiris at the temple complex of Karnak in Luxor, Egypt, believed to date to the 7th century B.C. is being studied by archaeologists.

archaeology.org/issues/304-1807/from-the-trenches/6698-trenches-egypt-luxor-karnak-osiris-chapel

(Courtesy Essam Nagy/Egypt Exploration Society)

 

Comment on Facebook

Oooh, built by King Taharqa, one of the most iconic of the Kushite pharaohs of the 25th Dynasty 🙂

Wish I could visit this place.

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Geochemical analysis of Aztec and Mixtec turquoise artifacts suggests the turquoise used in them had been mined in Mesoamerica, and not imported from the American Southwest, where ancient turquoise mines have been found.

archaeology.org/news/6722-180614-mesoamerican-turquoise-mines

(Oliver Santana, Editorial Raices)
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Geochemical analysis of Aztec and Mixtec turquoise artifacts  suggests the turquoise used in them had been mined in Mesoamerica, and not imported from the American Southwest, where ancient turquoise mines have been found. 

archaeology.org/news/6722-180614-mesoamerican-turquoise-mines

(Oliver Santana, Editorial Raices)

 

Comment on Facebook

So where were the Aztec turquoise mines?

sıra dışı bir motif... harika

Philip Chambless

A prehistoric dwelling, which may have been part of a larger settlement and includes a hearth made of stone slabs, a hammer stone, rubble, and tools, has been discovered in the Scottish Highlands.

archaeology.org/news/6721-180614-scotland-stone-hearth

(Orkney Research Centre for Archaeology)
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A prehistoric dwelling, which may have been part of a larger settlement and includes a hearth made of stone slabs, a hammer stone, rubble, and tools, has been discovered in the Scottish Highlands. 

archaeology.org/news/6721-180614-scotland-stone-hearth

(Orkney Research Centre for Archaeology)

 

Comment on Facebook

Maybe it was Jamie Fraser's hideout. LOL

Not an FF then?

Hobbit house

Nicky Moxey

Arianna Fajardo

Mark David

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#FBF: Excavations at the Minoan site of Gournia in Crete have given archaeologists a new look at Europe's first great civilization.

archaeology.org/issues/174-1505/features/3145-crete-minoans-gournia-excavations

(Courtesy Chronis Papanikolopoulos)
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#FBF: Excavations at the Minoan site of Gournia in Crete have given archaeologists a new look at Europes first great civilization. 

archaeology.org/issues/174-1505/features/3145-crete-minoans-gournia-excavations 

(Courtesy Chronis Papanikolopoulos)

 

Comment on Facebook

Does the geology of Crete show that tsunamis occur throughout the ages? When I was on Etna in Sicily, you could look to the southeast and see where massive blocks of lava flow sheared off into the Mediterranean, like rock glaciers calving into the water.

If you follow the numbered pages after the original short article, there is a wealth of information here.

I'm interested in the theory that the eruption of Thera caused a catastrophic tsunami that decimated Crete.

I was last there 10 years ago. Great to visit from anywhere on the island, however nearest major tourist spot is Ag Nic.

Is there evidence of such an occurrence at these sites?

Peter Robinson we need to go to Crete so interesting!

Rym Al ... a la recherche de Minea ?

Siegrun Maas

Kim McCall

Rob Peña

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Maine’s Pemaquid Peninsula was home to an early and tenacious English outpost that became a nexus for goods and people from around the maritime world.

archaeology.org/issues/304-1807/from-the-trenches/6699-trenches-maine-colonial-pemaquid-state-historic-site

(Courtesy Maine Bureau of Parks & Lands)
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Maine’s Pemaquid Peninsula was home to an early and tenacious English outpost that became a nexus for goods and people from around the maritime world.

archaeology.org/issues/304-1807/from-the-trenches/6699-trenches-maine-colonial-pemaquid-state-historic-site

(Courtesy Maine Bureau of Parks & Lands)

 

Comment on Facebook

Bellarmine bottles / jugs are really great pieces of pottery

I love these bottles, I've never found a whole one, just lts of bits of emblem or handle etc.

I love that area on Maine and it is well known for this in the region. Thank you for posting this!

Three geoglyphs, thought to be between 6,000 and 3,000 years old, have been discovered in northern Peru.

archaeology.org/news/6720-180613-peru-circular-geoglyphs

(Los Morteros-Pampa de las Salinas Archaeological Project)
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Three geoglyphs, thought to be between 6,000 and 3,000 years old, have been discovered in northern Peru. 

archaeology.org/news/6720-180613-peru-circular-geoglyphs

(Los Morteros-Pampa de las Salinas Archaeological Project)

 

Comment on Facebook

That's a big gap. 6,000 or 3,000 years

Photos of them would be helpful!

Archeologists should carry a small video capable drone to visualize sites like this.

Incredible that new formations are still being found.

Cool rocks, bro.

En taltal norte de chile tambien existen esos morteros..

Red purse.....3000 to 6000 years old as well.

Andrew Dibden

i cant wait to go back...

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The discovery of ancient human remains on California's San Miguel Island in 2005 has just now been announced to the public, along with revelations that the middle-aged man died between 9,800 and 10,200 years ago.

archaeology.org/news/6719-180613-california-tuqan-man

(Tim Hauf)
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The discovery of ancient human remains on Californias San Miguel Island in 2005 has just now been announced to the public, along with revelations that the middle-aged man died between 9,800 and 10,200 years ago. 

archaeology.org/news/6719-180613-california-tuqan-man

(Tim Hauf)

 

Comment on Facebook

Columbus being the first to discover America? Not even close! 😄

Why does this info take so long to reach the public?

End of last ice age. When you could walk there?

The thing I find most odd about this story is that he wasn't simply re-buried where he was initially buried.

When will they notify the family so we can know who he was!

What a shame. He was so close to Los Angeles!

Not Chumash. The Chumash came into the area much, much later than that.

Interesting, but not really treading new ground as it were. We know humans reached California about 13000 years. Interesting though.

I didn't even know he was ill.

Why did it take 13 yrs for this info?

Don’t tell the Christians that.

Middle age sucks

WOW.

Colleen Young

David Ginsberg

Interesting

Early Dude!

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