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11 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

Excavations at Hanoi’s Imperial Citadel of Thang Long have uncovered remains of buildings dating from about A.D. 1000 to 1400, as well as pieces of roof tiles shaped like dragons and decorated with bright yellow and green enamel, which date from A.D. 980 to 1009.

archaeology.org/news/6559-180420vietnam-imperial-citadel

(Wikimedia Commons)
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Excavations at Hanoi’s Imperial Citadel of Thang Long have uncovered remains of buildings dating from about A.D. 1000 to 1400, as well as pieces of roof tiles shaped like dragons and decorated with bright yellow and green enamel, which date from  A.D. 980 to 1009. 

archaeology.org/news/6559-180420vietnam-imperial-citadel

(Wikimedia Commons)

 

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Ron Christian ... FYI

12 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

The remains of three dogs recovered from sites in Illinois, who appear to have died of natural causes and were buried individually, have been dated to 10,000 years ago—making them 700 years older than the previously oldest-known dogs in North America.

archaeology.org/news/6560-180420-north-america-dogs

(Center for American Archeology)
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The remains of three dogs recovered from sites in Illinois, who appear to have died of natural causes and were buried individually, have been dated to 10,000 years ago—making them 700 years older than the previously oldest-known dogs in North America. 

archaeology.org/news/6560-180420-north-america-dogs

(Center for American Archeology)

 

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Amazing how they can emphatically say they can calculate a difference of 700 years from dirt. That is 7% difference in calculating the age of these bones. That cannot be done scientifically. They're speculating

So 10 000 years ago we loved our dogs. That's pretty cool.

But were they good dogs?

Btw, the previous known dogs, 9,300 years ago, were eaten by people in what is now Texas? 420 was last week, brah....

Hmmm.... wonder where the cat is😳

There's something touching and sweet about them being buried.

*embarrassed Texan*

Victoria Evans - Maybe it was Carbondale 🙂

Read “The Dog Master” by Cameron. Kind of different from his other books and now one of my favorites! ❤️🐾❤️

You can tell they were good pups 🙂

wow, they were buried

If archeologists can prove that they were buried then it is amazing.

Good puppers and doggos.

Any DNA recovered? If so is it possible to clone the dogs?

Very cool find. 💕 🐕

So awesome

How big were they?

What type of dog was it

Good dogs <3

Amazing 🤙🏻

Native Dogs, not those pushy immigrant dogs.

Keith Atkins

Jennifer Hensley

Jerome Lynn Hall

Joe Guzzardo

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13 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

A Neolithic monument known as Cotton Henge, first discovered through the use of aerial photography in the 1970s, has been completely exposed for study in advance of construction in Northamptonshire, England.

archaeology.org/news/6561-180420-england-cotton-henge

(Oxford Archaeology East)
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A Neolithic monument known as Cotton Henge, first discovered through the use of aerial photography in the 1970s, has been completely exposed for study in advance of construction in Northamptonshire, England.

archaeology.org/news/6561-180420-england-cotton-henge

(Oxford Archaeology East)

 

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Nice! But, is it then going to be impacted by the pending construction? Hope not...

Sad they are often studied only to be destroyed

I think there is a large burial mound nearby at Irthlingborough. All part of the Nene culture.

It is astounding to find these traces of ancient peoples.

Siegrun Maas

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14 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

#OTD in 1014, King Brian Boru of Ireland defeated Viking forces at the Battle of Clontarf. Recent archaeology in Dublin and other cities with Norse origins suggests Scandinavian raiders settled permanently in Ireland earlier than previously thought.

archaeology.org/issues/168-1503/features/2969-ireland-dublin-early-viking-prescence

(Courtesy Linzi Simpson)
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#OTD in 1014, King Brian Boru of Ireland defeated Viking forces at the Battle of Clontarf. Recent archaeology in Dublin and other cities with Norse origins suggests Scandinavian raiders settled permanently in Ireland earlier than previously thought. 

archaeology.org/issues/168-1503/features/2969-ireland-dublin-early-viking-prescence

(Courtesy Linzi Simpson)

 

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Hence the 5% Scandinavian component in my DNA.

There were Norwegian visitors to Kerry possibly in the 6th century - local legend says they were pursued into a cave on Kerry Head ... secret of brewing ale from fermented barley was given by them in exchange for their lives and being allowed to flee in their boat ....

In 1014 King Brian Boru was killed fighting Irish aligned with Norse settlers who had been living in Ireland for over 300 years.

Great Vikings will always be remembered as Founding Legends of English Civilization and Language.

I love that sentence: "...than previously thought" 😀 (y)

They got around, that’s for sure!

David, Will CLONTARF!

... Marc

Vamsi Krishna Naidu gud nyt 🙂

Mark David

Wha Tever

Dennis Bullock

Allan Bourke

James Russell

Seán McCarthy

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15 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

Scraps of pages from a 1712 narrative of a round-the-world voyage were found amid the wreckage of Queen Anne’s Revenge, the pirate Blackbeard’s flagship.

archaeology.org/issues/298-1805/trenches/6519-trenches-north-carolina-shipwreck-book

(N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources)
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Scraps of pages from a 1712 narrative of a round-the-world voyage were found amid the wreckage of Queen Anne’s Revenge, the pirate Blackbeard’s flagship.

archaeology.org/issues/298-1805/trenches/6519-trenches-north-carolina-shipwreck-book

(N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources)

 

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I wonder if they were using it as loo paper????

To find paper from the wreck and determine what it was is mind blowing!

Wow!

Nice😊

Very cool!

Gail pure awesomeness

Nancy...

Mike

Thomas Gerke

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From A.D. 121 on, the Romans celebrated the founding of their city every April 21 with chariot racing.

archaeology.org/issues/180-1507/features/3350-horses-role-in-sport-and-spectacle

(DEA/G. Nimatallah)
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From A.D. 121 on, the Romans celebrated the founding of their city every April 21 with chariot racing.

archaeology.org/issues/180-1507/features/3350-horses-role-in-sport-and-spectacle 

(DEA/G. Nimatallah)

 

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Who founded the city of Rome?

No suckling wolves?? Lame.

He's holding the reins in just one hand and not laced between his fingers. I'd say that rig has two speeds, Stop and go as fast as you can.

Rome didn't fall; it was Fundamentally Transformed.

At least he's not texting.

This relic was found in cyprus island very rear and valable and under closely monitored by antiquity museum

Magnificent artworks tying horses and humans together through time & distance.

Speed kills

Today are 2771 years.

Ben-Hur.

the future ferrari f1

fantastic image

Wonderful!

Awesome

Happy birthday Christy Daly

Natalia Kłeczek

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Austria has repatriated a collection of first-century A.D. Dacian gold and silver artifacts to Romania, including more than 450 coins and 18 bracelets, thought to have been plundered from the Orastie Mountains between 2000 and 2001.

archaeology.org/news/6558-180419-romania-repatriation-artifacts

(Courtesy National Museum of Romanian History)
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Austria has repatriated a collection of first-century A.D. Dacian gold and silver artifacts to Romania, including more than 450 coins and 18 bracelets, thought to have been plundered from the Orastie Mountains between 2000 and 2001.

archaeology.org/news/6558-180419-romania-repatriation-artifacts

(Courtesy National Museum of Romanian History)

 

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A lot of ancient artifacts hit the market after the fall of communist rrgimes. If a farmer discovered something in the field there was no motivation for him to turn it over to the government. He just hid it somewhere and waited for a time when he could get some profit.

Good work 👍👍👍

Excellent outcome. The linked article showed impressive Thracian goldwork from a burial mound (that was not looted)!

Yeah Austria!!!

Marita Filler

Elekes Attila

Ciprian Tudor

Nothing new, Austrians had also sacked a monastery in Bosnia where the remains of several of our kings were kept, they've smashed the bones to get the gold and jewelry and had also killed a number of priests who've attempted to prevent this. This had happened immediately after the annexation of Bosnia, I believe.

Love the Australians

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Paleontologists suggest that a hole in a cow skull uncovered at the Neolithic site of Champ-Durand in southwestern France could be evidence of a surgical procedure, and possibly practice for trepanation on humans.

archaeology.org/news/6557-180419-neolithic-cow-trepanation

(Fernando Ramirez Rozzi)
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Paleontologists suggest that a hole in a cow skull uncovered at the Neolithic site of Champ-Durand in southwestern France could be evidence of a surgical procedure, and possibly practice for trepanation on humans. 

archaeology.org/news/6557-180419-neolithic-cow-trepanation

(Fernando Ramirez Rozzi)

 

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More than likely a spear with a rock point arrow. Duh.

May be just a pike-ax...

They were trying to get at the brain to eat it.

It could be from that, it is also similar to bolt hole type weapon used to slaughter cattle today.

Or they have simply tried to finish an injured cow by piercing is brain...

More likely someone was hungry....Guess when I see a pile of clam shells exposed near a river bank..near old native village sites...with a similar hole in it... they were practicing surgury on a thousand of them too!

And they call themselves scientists?

I found a 38 million year old Rhino skull that had mud & sand around it the paleontologist pointed out how rodents after it died bored a hole in the skull for a nice place to reside as it had been chewed around the edges of the hole

Appears the fracture came from the back of the skull. Bone fragments came out the front of the skull.Old skulls shoved on sharp tree limbs on trees or poles may have caused such holes.

Very plausible. After all, doing this without some sort of practice or demonstration would hardly have sufficed for that person to learn how b

Pole axed....

holey cow!

Or maybe they were just hungry and bashed it's head in with a rock?

Maybe a mouse bored into it or another creature as they love to chew bone

Didn't they used to kill them for butchering by hitting there with a ballpeen hammer?

Ummmmm nope. Someone just punch a hole in the cows head for dinner. Just saying.

Or gored?

Or maybe it was speared.

Looks like a Halberd ax wound.

Attempt to save the first mad cow..

good place for a kill

Or it was placed on a pike.

Simple. Pole axed. Still happens today.

Michelle Salgado

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Traces of red and yellow pigments, possibly from Roman propaganda illustrations, have been detected on distance stones of the Antonine Wall, which was built in the 2nd century A.D. about 99 miles north of Hadrian's Wall.

archaeology.org/news/6556-180419-scotland-distance-stone

(Hunterian Museum, Glasgow University)
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Traces of red and yellow pigments, possibly from Roman propaganda illustrations, have been detected on distance stones of the Antonine Wall, which was built in the 2nd century A.D. about 99 miles north of Hadrians Wall. 

archaeology.org/news/6556-180419-scotland-distance-stone

(Hunterian Museum, Glasgow University)

 

Comment on Facebook

I thought the world was still in black and white in those days.

Did yea ken tha' Agricola biulded (built) the 'Stane Hoose' callided Arthur's O'on, (Wains Belling) een th' wrang place, it shid hav' bin aet Clack Manning Hoarse, of The Odini Gododdini en Lugdonia (West Lothain). Originally Agricola built it for Stenhousemuir FC. Cruthen Camelon's Fit bau Sid, a bunch of tatooed Navie Ferries🤔. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonine_Wall

Civilization or crime family?

Graffiti!

ANTONINE WALLLLL!!!! <3 Katarzyna Koziol

Trevor Lee Rosina Cargill

Siegrun Maas

Faye Kruithof

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A collection of bronze weapons, including quivers filled with arrows, dating to between 900 and 600 B.C. were found in Oman. #FBF

archaeology.org/issues/221-1607/trenches/4544-trenches-oman-bronze-weapons

(© Guillaume Gernez / Mission archéologique française en Oman central)
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A collection of bronze weapons, including quivers filled with arrows, dating to between 900 and 600 B.C. were found in Oman. #FBF 

archaeology.org/issues/221-1607/trenches/4544-trenches-oman-bronze-weapons 

(© Guillaume Gernez / Mission archéologique française en Oman central)

 

Comment on Facebook

...seeing this makes me quiver

How bout the arrows? It looks like they survived. Were the bronze too?

2500 yr old bows, and they are still strung? Come on really ! Pull the other one !

I would guess they were for mounting on a statue, i.e. they were part of the statue's weaponry

Is there something strange about the proportions ?

Probably decorative. Definitely look like they were made for wall hanging or statuary.

Wow! Crazy intact after all this time and environmental conditions. Great find!

That is super awesome!

My dream job. Id love to go on an rxpedition with archaeologists and dig with them

hunting lodge maybe?

where the baby shoes bronzed back then too?

So Astonishing

Jennie Andersonhave you seen this? Very cool!

I want them 😍

Cool

That’s sick

James Luc Meltonville Oooooh, Pretty!

GOTT IM HIMMEL ! ! ! ! ! ! !

Wow cool

عمان بضم العين ...

Oh Man!

Liv Constantin du kan sole og jeg kan grave? 🤩

Incredible!

Naaaaaaa

AWESOMEEEEEE

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The wreckage of U-3523, a Nazi submarine sunk by a British aerial assault on May 6, 1945—the day after Nazi forces surrendered in Denmark—has been discovered in the North Sea by Danish researchers.

archaeology.org/news/6555-180419-nazi-u-boat

(Sea War Museum Jutland)
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The wreckage of U-3523, a Nazi submarine sunk by a British aerial assault on May 6, 1945—the day after Nazi forces surrendered in Denmark—has been discovered in the North Sea by Danish researchers. 

archaeology.org/news/6555-180419-nazi-u-boat

(Sea War Museum Jutland)

 

Comment on Facebook

Red Skull thwarted.... Cap's prob down there too.

In other news, the Democrat light-cruiser USS Juneau was found off the Solomons. Smh.

Any future plans to explore this sub?

Another diagonal wreck! Reminds me of HMS VICTORIA - THE VERTICAL WRECK

interesting, hope they scuttled it and got out in time.

U-Boot Typ XXI

One of the new boats.

Wow really. And

***U-Boat

Janie Knutson

James Christian Scott

Dave Richard

Michael Leighton

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A newly translated, 1,500-year-old Coptic papyrus discovered near Egypt's pyramid of Pharaoh Senwosret I in 1934 describes the biblical story of the binding of Isaac, in which God told Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac on Mount Moriah.

archaeology.org/news/6552-180418-coptic-papyrus-sacrifice

(The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Public Domain)
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A newly translated, 1,500-year-old Coptic papyrus discovered near Egypts pyramid of Pharaoh Senwosret I in 1934 describes the biblical story of the binding of Isaac, in which God told Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac on Mount Moriah.

archaeology.org/news/6552-180418-coptic-papyrus-sacrifice

(The Metropolitan Museum of Art/Public Domain)

 

Comment on Facebook

Dave Brown, if you read the story you’d know that God never intended for Abraham to sacrifice his son. It was to test his faith. There’s so many gross errors and misconceptions about the Bible in this thread. Sigh. Someone said that “Yahweh did indeed accept human sacrifice.” No He didn’t. Please give me one example from Scripture where God accepted human sacrifice. I doubt, highly doubt even, that you’ve even opened a Bible much less read one. The only case I can think of that may be misconstrued as human sacrifice would be the story of the daughter of Jephthah. But, it isn’t written that God ‘accepted’ this. A human sacrifice wouldn’t be acceptable to God because human beings are sinful. The real nonsense is the atheist’s perverse (mis)understanding of the Bible.

This version has the money shot. It'S like an original Grimm's fairytale: too violent for the kiddos and therefore unpalatable, changed to be kinder and gentler. The god of the christians is a jealous, violent, blood-sacrifice loving boogeyman.

That is not Isaac, he is Ismael..

I don't doubt this at all, this was probably 1,000 years after the Israelite's left Egypt. Five hundred years after Jesus was born making this the fifth century. We know in the original Greek from the first century that the story showed God as sending a ram to replace Isaac. This is also about the time that Islam started. So I can well imagine that the stories would have been changed to show the Christian/ Judea God to be less than desirable.

It’s so fascinating how there are so many experts on the subject! Knowing you know nothing. Opinions are awesome 😎

What if the world told you to give your most precious time to the endeavor of doing for others? What if there was a different way to be in the world? What if we should trust in that giving to community of our sweat and blood, in the trust that it would be a blessing? What if the story isn't a story of somebody sacrificing their precious son at all? What if it wasn't Judaism or Christianity, but a way of being in this world?

How can you begin to read that

God said to Abraham, kill me a son Abe said man you must be putting me on God said no, Abe said what God said you can do what you want to but The next time you see me coming you'd better run Abe said where you want this killing done God said out on Highway 61

Still doesn't prove the story is real just the paper it was written on. Otherwise all those ancient stories from all cultures are true.

Proof that a man heard voices, thought to tie up his son and murder him, to prove himself worthy of God's love. Thankfully today we put these people in mental institutions

And yet 0 about Hebrew in Egypt. Lol

Greg-Jani Thomas really interesting

A vapour-based god at his finest! 😂

So which of the versions is the factual one?

And all the worlds problems would be solved ?

Didn't find the story anywhere.

What kind of God demands this of you? No justification, it is rubbish. I would have no truck with any God that asks you destroy others.

amazing ¡¡¡

Rhings seem to work out this way

Cool

Krystal Montana

Javad Mofrad

Chris Sheppard

David Blankenberg

Siegrun Maas

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#OTD in 1775 the Revolutionary War began at Lexington and Concord. Facing long odds agains the British, Continental Army strategists considered inventions of experimental warfare, including a submersible vessel called Turtle, reconstructed below.

archive.archaeology.org/0505/abstracts/warsub.html

(Cary Wolinsky)
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#OTD in 1775 the Revolutionary War began at Lexington and Concord. Facing long odds agains the British, Continental Army strategists considered inventions of experimental warfare, including a submersible vessel called Turtle, reconstructed below. 

archive.archaeology.org/0505/abstracts/warsub.html

 (Cary Wolinsky)

 

Comment on Facebook

Invented by David Bushnell of Connecticut, a distant cousin through my maternal grandmother.

Yes. Didn't Bushnell have something to do with that?

Steampunk full forward she goes.

Which sank

I love the episode on "Turn", a Netflix series, when Brewster uses Ben's device to cross a body of water undetected by the British and he blows up a wharf! Season 2 or 3.

There's a nice cutaway model of one of these in the British Museum...or used to be 30 years ago, may still be there. I have a photo...I'll dig it out.

also known as the peanut of death.

Carrie Medina I was just mentioning this yesterday!

Joaquin Loyzaga make me a miniture of this plz

North Korea still has a fleet of those, you can sink them if you knock on the screen door

I thought it was a whimsical work of art. sadly a bit more ominous than that.

Pfft..that's a bathysphere from Rapture.

Liberty 's Kids on PBS did an episode on the Turtle. It's where I first learned about it.

This is in the oceanography museum in Monaco

I can go see one anytime at the Navy museum in New London, CT - free!

So steampunk-y

Love it

‘Merica!

Tom Pears incredible

Thank you

Tom Brown coincidentally enough.....

Michel Dann Erwan Mallet 🐸🐸🐸

Mary Elizabeth O'Neal

Elizabeth Dennis

Brent Rudmann

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#TBT: Ancient Greek curse tablets discovered in a 4th-century B.C. cemetery near Athens had some surprising targets.

archaeology.org/issues/221-1607/trenches/4546-trenches-greece-curse-tablets

(Courtesy Jessica Lamont)
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#TBT: Ancient Greek curse tablets discovered in a 4th-century B.C. cemetery near Athens had some surprising targets. 

archaeology.org/issues/221-1607/trenches/4546-trenches-greece-curse-tablets 

(Courtesy Jessica Lamont)

 

Comment on Facebook

Well, what did they say?

Wonder if the curse worked

Curse tablets! I’m going right to my study now! My fingers are itching! 😀

Maybe she was just pissed that they were aiding her husband in drunkenness.

First line read “your momma”.

interesting

Heel leuk! Lisa

Ilija Bare Baljengo Dankovic

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An intact collared urn, flint tools, and additional pieces of pottery have been found under just ten inches of dirt in a Bronze Age burial mound overlooking the English Channel in southwestern England.

archaeology.org/news/6551-180418-england-cornish-barrow

(ANU)
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An intact collared urn, flint tools, and additional pieces of pottery have been found under just ten inches of dirt in a Bronze Age burial mound overlooking the English Channel in southwestern England. 

archaeology.org/news/6551-180418-england-cornish-barrow

(ANU)

 

Comment on Facebook

I wonder where in Cornwall this was found

So many cool treasures in England.

Very cool.☺

Nancy Mcdade..

Siegrun Maas

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