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49 minutes ago

Archaeology Magazine

A heat wave that swept across the U.K. and Ireland in the summer of 2018 exposed a range of sites covering some 5,000 years of history, including this Roman fort in Wales.

archaeology.org/issues/315-1811/features/7042-heat-wave-archaeology

(Courtesy Mark Walters/Skywest Surveys)
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A heat wave that swept across the U.K. and Ireland in the summer of 2018 exposed a range of sites covering some 5,000 years of history, including this Roman fort in Wales.

archaeology.org/issues/315-1811/features/7042-heat-wave-archaeology

(Courtesy Mark Walters/Skywest Surveys)

 

Comment on Facebook

Since we have no future, the climate crisis is allowing us to look into the past. Lovely.

Hannah Kirby represent!

Sam Hayward

2 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

A kneeling Crusader knight and his horse, from a manuscript called the Westminster Psalter, published in England, ca. 1250, is featured on the cover of our November/December 2018 issue: archaeology.org/issues

Explore more! Subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

Photo: © British Library Board/Bridgeman Images
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A kneeling Crusader knight and his horse, from a manuscript called the Westminster Psalter, published in England, ca. 1250, is featured on the cover of our November/December 2018 issue: archaeology.org/issues

Explore more! Subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

Photo: © British Library Board/Bridgeman Images

 

Comment on Facebook

I was just reading about Psalters in another book. Quite interesting.

Great magazine

Sam Hayward

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22 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

Traces of a Neolithic settlement, which appears to have been built around a large building that may have been a temple, have been discovered in a remote mountain valley in southern Jordan.

archaeology.org/news/7030-181012-jordan-neolithic-settlement

(Jagiellonian University)
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Traces of a Neolithic settlement, which appears to have been built around a large building that may have been a temple, have been discovered in a remote mountain valley in southern Jordan. 

archaeology.org/news/7030-181012-jordan-neolithic-settlement

(Jagiellonian University)

 

Comment on Facebook

Jordan is a hotbed for early Neolithic sights. Western Turkey, Syria and Jordan being the birthplace of farming.

Will be fascinating to learn more about this site.

Pottery Neolithic

Jordanie Bro Keven Ouellet

Siegrun Maas

Sam Hayward

Holly Winter

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23 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

New research suggests that the Rapa Nui of Easter Island placed the stone statues known as moai in places where drinking water was available.

archaeology.org/news/7031-181012-easter-island-water

(Aurbina via Wikimedia Commons)
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New research suggests that the Rapa Nui of Easter Island placed the stone statues known as moai in places where drinking water was available. 

archaeology.org/news/7031-181012-easter-island-water

(Aurbina via Wikimedia Commons)

 

Comment on Facebook

Fountain heads then 😉

Then why are they in neat rows, or clusters (as in the picture) and facing the sea?

Does anyone know deep these statues are set ?

or they built them where they lived which was next to the drinking water

Oh! Guardians of the Water Source!

Of course the photo that is being used has nothing to do with the actual placement of the statues. The photo here is just of statues that hadn't been moved yet and were abandoned on the side of the volcano where they were carved.

Congruent to the Nazca lines in Peru?

Water water everywhere... ...the end.

Novel theory.

Isn't this where Easter bunnies lives...🤣🤣

looked up at these heads & had such a surreal moment... then scanned a few comments...

Dig them out, lets see the full bodies.

Lots of water!

Nice

Amazing .....XO

Madelyn Rose, they may have been well markers

There’s a hell of a lot easier ways to mark a well. C’mon

☕️

Charlene Rose Kobes Simpson

So on a small island, they had to mark water sources with gigantic heads?

Perhaps places where explorers and looters approach land from sea....to create fear in them that giants are watching them while tribes and clans sleep calmly in their villagers

If you squeeze facts enough you can come up any theory you choose. We will probably never know what the real story is.

Dumb head!

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1 day ago

Archaeology Magazine

From the Archives: Archaeologists at the Neolithic ritual center of Göbekli Tepe in Turkey discovered a fragment of a human skull that was carved and altered after death, and possibly put on public display.

archaeology.org/issues/281-1801/features/6165-turkey-neolithic-skull-cult

(National Geographic Magazines/GettyImages)
(Courtesy Julia Gresky)
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From the Archives: Archaeologists at the Neolithic ritual center of Göbekli Tepe in Turkey discovered a fragment of a human skull that was carved and altered after death, and possibly put on public display.

archaeology.org/issues/281-1801/features/6165-turkey-neolithic-skull-cult

(National Geographic Magazines/GettyImages)
(Courtesy Julia Gresky)Image attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Göbekli Tepe dates back to paleolithic and this is the most important speciality of it. It is the first temple of world which we founded yet. It takes back building capacity of humans before neolithic.

I hope it was after death...ouch. lol

This site is profoundly mysterious. Unique in construction, yet little known about purpose, and the peoples responsible.

that could have come from skinning?

nice

☕️

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The earliest known horse burial in Egypt was excavated at Avaris, the capital of the Hyksos, a people from western Asia who immigrated to Egypt and then ruled the country for a century.

archaeology.org/issues/309-1809/features/6855-egypt-hyksos-foreign-dynasty

(Courtesy © Manfred Bietak)
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The earliest known horse burial in Egypt was excavated at Avaris, the capital of the Hyksos, a people from western Asia who immigrated to Egypt and then ruled the country for a century.

archaeology.org/issues/309-1809/features/6855-egypt-hyksos-foreign-dynasty

(Courtesy © Manfred Bietak)

 

Comment on Facebook

please also post the period

still beautiful in death

This horse was loved !!!

ΟΙ ΥΞΩΣ ,ΠΟΛΕΜΙΚΟΤΑΤΟΣ ΛΑΟΣ

Wow!!!

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A bronze Corinthian helmet has been discovered in the burial of several 5th-century B.C. Greek warriors in southwestern Russia.

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6880-trenches-russia-corinthian-helmet

(Courtesy of the Institute of Archaeology/Russian Academy of Sciences)
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A bronze Corinthian helmet has been discovered in the burial of several 5th-century B.C. Greek warriors in southwestern Russia.

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6880-trenches-russia-corinthian-helmet

(Courtesy of the Institute of Archaeology/Russian Academy of Sciences)

 

Comment on Facebook

Vakske skeppn zegt ie Sylvie Merchie

COOL

Phenomenal!!🌟💕

Jennie Giangarra

Jason Bash

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3 days ago

Ancient Hidden History

Gaia
Very little is known about these ancient pyramids near the Nazca lines. Why do you think they were built?
Explore more: ow.ly/KVSB30cnvok
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Excavations at a cave called Arene Candide in Italy’s northwestern Liguria region have offered unusual insight into how Paleolithic people buried their dead.

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6882-trenches-italy-paleolithic-burials

(Courtesy Vitale Sparacello)
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Excavations at a cave called Arene Candide in Italy’s northwestern Liguria region have offered unusual insight into how Paleolithic people buried their dead.

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6882-trenches-italy-paleolithic-burials

(Courtesy Vitale Sparacello)

 

Comment on Facebook

Bencede vahşi hayvanlar insanları yakalayıp yemiş kemikleri orda birakmiş dagınık bir sekilde kolay av bencede insan

Undertakers and Priests.

You sure they weren't eating them? I bet humans were much easier to hunt than mammoths...

Laila Koussaimi

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An examination of some 3,000 ancient animal bones found in Madagascar for evidence of butchery places the arrival of humans on the island between 1,350 and 1,100 years ago, contradicting another recent study that suggests humans arrived there much earlier.

archaeology.org/news/7025-181010-madagascar-human-arrival

(Anderson et al., 2018)
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An examination of some 3,000 ancient animal bones found in Madagascar for evidence of butchery places the arrival of humans on the island between 1,350 and 1,100 years ago, contradicting another recent study that suggests humans arrived there much earlier. 

archaeology.org/news/7025-181010-madagascar-human-arrival

(Anderson et al., 2018)

 

Comment on Facebook

At face value & given the evidence of the spread of humans worldwide, this date seems rather recent, I find it hard to believe that modern humans were in Australia 48000 years before they reached Madagascar.

Recent cut marks do not disprove earlier acyivity

You can not date occupation by knife marks on bones. Maybe the first arrivals were plant eaters, and or fish eaters until they found the required materials to make hunting tools.

This is not exactly the most sound of reasoning.

Suspect humans were on Madagascar must ealier than 500 AD.

Don’t be silly ....really based on this flimsy evidence

So they found bones with evidence of human butchery about 1200 years agao and this contradicts an earlier date for arrival of humans???. I fail to understand how??

Intriguing,but very shaky with a sprinkle of assumptions!

Yes. These are the earliest discovered butchered animals on earth. All butchered animals before this are flukes.

How does this ‘contradict’ theories that man arrived EARLIER?

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A grim new study of victims from the A.D. 79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius discovered at Herculaneum suggests they were killed by fast-moving currents of volcanic ash and gas, which created temperatures hot enough to vaporize body fluids and explode the skull.

archaeology.org/news/7027-181011-herculaneum-boiled-blood

(Petrone et al., PLOS ONE (2018))
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A grim new study of victims from the A.D. 79 eruption of Mount Vesuvius discovered at Herculaneum suggests they were killed by fast-moving currents of volcanic ash and gas, which created temperatures hot enough to vaporize body fluids and explode the skull. 

archaeology.org/news/7027-181011-herculaneum-boiled-blood

(Petrone et al., PLOS ONE (2018))

 

Comment on Facebook

That blew my mind....to soon?

Heads explode in a house fire unless there is already a hole. Dr Bass taught this in his class. Helps determine foul play if the head is intact after a suspicious fire.

Uggghhhh! How horrible

May they ALL have Died , quickly.....with but seconds of Pain....Sad....

Horrific to think about if that’s how they died.

That's what happens when a body gets cremated.

Im so like to studied about these areas in archaeology.. bt in sri lanka those facility given only the medicine student... if anyone know hw to engaging these activities plz tell me.. im from sri lanka

Question is, are the residents of Naples on top of this?

Makes me wonder what these bones are made of, if they could have withstood such heat. Rock? 🤨🤯🧐😁

Terrifying to consider.

What a horrible way to go.

Horrible. Just horrible. How lucky we are.

at least it was quick . . . .

That’s how I want to go

Nothing new but they were already dead by suffocation by the hot air and gas. The bodys just keept on coocking.

Nice arch.

David, thought you would find this interesting, too

Um, pretty sure they've been saying this for as long as I can recall...

Had to be absolutely terrifying.

🤯

Siegrun Maas

Matt Pasquali

Sam Hayward

Rosalyn O'Halloran

Clare Dorey

+ View previous comments

A residence with a well-preserved shrine dedicated to the Lares, household deities that were believed to offer protection to Roman homes, has been discovered in Pompeii.

archaeology.org/news/7022-181009-italy-pompeii-lararium

(Courtesy Ciro Fusco)
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A residence with a well-preserved shrine dedicated to the Lares, household deities that were believed to offer protection to Roman homes, has been discovered in Pompeii.

archaeology.org/news/7022-181009-italy-pompeii-lararium

(Courtesy Ciro Fusco)

 

Comment on Facebook

Apparently the Lares were on vacation that day.

Another good bites the ash.

Water was running, children were running You were running out of time Under the mountain, a golden fountain Were you praying at the Lares' shrine? But oh, your city lies in dust, my friend... - Siouxie and the Banshees

There are five year old murals in my town that don't look that good anymore. That's amazing.

In portuguese we still use the word "lares" to mention the houses were a families live. Lar is singular, Lares plural. Each 'lar' had it's own fireplace. One fireplace per family, to cook and get warm.

Pompeii, the gift of Vulcan that keeps on giving.

I'd love to get back to Pompeii. They've uncovered so much more since I was there.

My dream to be able to go there and herculanuim

That mural on the left has to be a restoration right?

Kind of ironic

What, no Penates?

Oh the irony....

Beautiful!

Paul Goddard for your info tomorrow 😀

Lisa Moerland..ook gezien?

Siegrun Maas

Laila Koussaimi

Erinn Scott

Deb Glencairn

Jon Williams

Featuring bearded snakes no less.

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#FBF A circular tomb discovered in northern China, which dates to the Liao Dynasty (A.D. 907–1125), features vividly colored mural panels depicting cranes, servants, and many articles of dress.

archaeology.org/issues/263-1707/from-the-trenches/5634-trenches-china-datong-tomb-murals

(Courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics)
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#FBF A circular tomb discovered in northern China, which dates to the Liao Dynasty (A.D. 907–1125), features vividly colored mural panels depicting cranes, servants, and many articles of dress. 

archaeology.org/issues/263-1707/from-the-trenches/5634-trenches-china-datong-tomb-murals

(Courtesy Chinese Cultural Relics)

 

Comment on Facebook

Am I the only one who wants more details about the circular tomb, walls, and urns???

If it is China, please check, recheck, rerecheck the dating. They are good at manufacturing ancient maps and artifacts 😊

Gorgeous , especially interested in the clothing . I'd wear it today .

Beautiful

Siegrun Maas

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Just off the coast of Sicily, a Byzantine-era ship that was carrying architectural elements intended to decorate a church is being excavated by archaeologists of the Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project.

archaeology.org/issues/309-1809/features/6856-sicily-byzantine-shipwreck

(Courtesy Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project)
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Just off the coast of Sicily, a Byzantine-era ship that was carrying architectural elements intended to decorate a church is being excavated by archaeologists of the Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project.

archaeology.org/issues/309-1809/features/6856-sicily-byzantine-shipwreck

(Courtesy Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project)

 

Comment on Facebook

New Perspectives on trade during that time.

They are lovely

Jen Friday

Leave it to the church to import decorations to keep the peasants sufficiently pious.

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New research suggests that salt produced along the coasts by the Maya between A.D. 300 and 900 was widely traded at inland markets.

archaeology.org/news/7021-181009-belize-maya-salt

(Louisiana State University)
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New research suggests that salt produced along the coasts by the Maya between A.D. 300 and 900 was widely traded at inland markets. 

archaeology.org/news/7021-181009-belize-maya-salt

(Louisiana State University)
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