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16 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

Egyptologists digging at the site of Tell el-Dab’a have identified it as Avaris, the capital of the Hyksos, immigrants from western Asia who came to Egypt and ruled the country for a century.

To read about this and other discoveries from around the world, subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

To read online articles from the September/October 2018 issue, go to archaeology.org/issues

(Courtesy © Manfred Bietak)
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Egyptologists digging at the site of Tell el-Dab’a have identified it as Avaris, the capital of the Hyksos, immigrants from western Asia who came to Egypt and ruled the country for a century.

To read about this and other discoveries from around the world, subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

To read online articles from the September/October 2018 issue, go to archaeology.org/issues

(Courtesy © Manfred Bietak)

 

Comment on Facebook

Fact check... hyksos were NOT immigrants, they were invaders. Hence ruling egypt for a century. Hyksos rule ended when the oppressed egyptians rose up.

"Western Asia" just say Europe.

Is it true we don't know much about the Hyksos/Hyksites (apologies I forget what they're referred to as as a people)

If this is the that they recover up every year it was Hebrews and some think the Hysos May well prove to be one in the same if this is the same site which it kind of looks like your pictures a Signet ring was found with the name Jacob

Whoever they were it goes to show that people have always moved to new lands and settled.

the nuanced approach to the Hyksos in the article is much more interesting than the simplistic invader scenario - it seems though, that more work needs to be done to support either hypothesis

Surely looks like nice archaeological excavations. Very nice !

This is still great history of our fore fathers, which, when excavation tells us how they lived, worked, and on my part I love much this kind of topics and history,

Siegrun Maas

Sarah Hitchens

Marion Cook

Curious if this is same site identified by David Rohl in his book about Avaris.

The Jewish historian Josephus said the Hyksos were one in the same people. The Hyksos were shepherds just like the Hebrews, hence the hieroglyph denoting them is a crook, the others would be throwing-stick denoting foreign, and then hills.

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17 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

A new study of scarlet macaw bones unearthed in New Mexico suggests the birds were bred in captivity and raised with significant specialized care by ancestral Pueblo peoples between A.D. 850 and 1150.

archaeology.org/news/6896-180814-new-mexico-macaws

(Edward Lear, PD-US)
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A new study of scarlet macaw bones unearthed in New Mexico suggests the birds were bred in captivity and raised with significant specialized care by ancestral Pueblo peoples between A.D. 850 and 1150. 

archaeology.org/news/6896-180814-new-mexico-macaws

(Edward Lear, PD-US)

 

Comment on Facebook

This is very interesting I was wandering if anyone knows where to find the research papers for these!

Mayans (and I assume others) valued their feathers for trade (like money). So having birds was like a money tree.

Wow! Alfredo Gutierrez Austero Mental Mutana Kataro

Montezuma's headdress is a featherwork crown which tradition holds belonged to Moctezuma II, the Aztec emperor . feathers were a big deal and still are today for native American tribes.

I sure didn’t know the pueblos raised them.

“a single, small aviary in what is now the southwestern United States or northwestern Mexico”. Which is it? Last I checked, New Mexico is part of the US.

A skull of the parrot was found on my property in Mimbres outside of Silver City NM.It is believed they originated or traded from Mexico and used for ceremonial reasons. Only the “elite “could afford such a prize.

X sus plumas eran muy valiosas??

Ruthann Gunter I thought you and papaw might find this interesting!

Frank Mosca

Shuni Giron

Mariela

Gabi Berlin

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18 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

Residue on pottery discovered at Turkey's site of Çatalhöyük may offer researchers insight into how a climatic shift some 8,200 years ago affected early farmers.

archaeology.org/news/6895-180814-turkey-catalhoyuk-climate

(Çatalhöyük Research Project)
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Residue on pottery discovered at Turkeys site of Çatalhöyük may offer researchers insight into how a climatic shift some 8,200 years ago affected early farmers. 

archaeology.org/news/6895-180814-turkey-catalhoyuk-climate

(Çatalhöyük Research Project)

19 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

Archaeologists have uncovered a variety of artifacts—which may date to around the first century B.C.—at the site of a sanctuary to the goddess Artemis near Amarynthos, southeastern Greece.

archaeology.org/news/6894-180814-greece-artemis-temple

(Ephorate of Antiquities)
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Archaeologists have uncovered a variety of artifacts—which may date to around the first century B.C.—at the site of a sanctuary to the goddess Artemis near Amarynthos, southeastern Greece. 

archaeology.org/news/6894-180814-greece-artemis-temple

(Ephorate of Antiquities)

 

Comment on Facebook

Proud for my ancestors! Greek land is rich with antiquities!

Charlie Brown, Too late to add to the itinerary?

Siegrun Maas

20 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

#OTD in 1969, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair opened in Bethel, New York. As Woodstock's 50th anniversary approaches, archaeologists are investigating the site of the iconic festival, which hosted over 400,000 concertgoers.

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6873-trenches-woodstock-festival-excavation

(Entertainment Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo (left), Binghamton University Public Archaeology Facility (right))
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#OTD in 1969, the Woodstock Music and Art Fair opened in Bethel, New York. As Woodstocks 50th anniversary approaches, archaeologists are investigating the site of the iconic festival, which hosted over 400,000 concertgoers. 

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6873-trenches-woodstock-festival-excavation

(Entertainment Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo (left), Binghamton University Public Archaeology Facility (right))

 

Comment on Facebook

Um...what are they going to find? Some old hash pipes and used condoms?

I really don't think a huge concert with people eating, pooping and f'ing in public is that historically worthy. (and the hate begins in3..2...)

Can I ask why Woodstock is so special?

if i were a scientist id wonder if archevidence matches what do we know about woodstock, and if not which is more accurate at the end !

You know you are old when archaeologists start diggin around where you partied

I wonder how Max Yasgur will feel about these guys digging up his fields ...

Cipriana Costello lets gooooo

looking for roach clips? lol

Why not just ask the people that were there they can tell you everything you need to know, lol

Hey... Perhaps any Super Rock Stars' teeth , glasses , gloves...broken guitars ...who knows...? That s this science task...

The comedian industry is going to have a field day with this one...

If you find my bong - please send it back !

There must be treasure down there ...needles, traces of drugs, sperm dna might be a bit degraded 😂 very little plastic I recon maybe few broken guitar strings, broken reading glasses,beer bottles, teeth if there was any fights or falls 😂 and god knows what else jesus what a way to spend some time and money

Why not just watch the films, talk to the people, read the books, and newspaper articles and magazine articles that number in the half Millions at least? What a huge waste of time

I'm still kicking myself that I turned down an offer to share the gas for a lift there.. I was only about 3 hrs away....one of THE seminal events of the "don't trust anyone over 30" generation

I moved away from Woodstock in August of '67. 2 years later I was in Japan, living with my Dad. I opened up our copy of the Armed Forces newspaper The Stars And Stripes and just about screamed when I saw Woodstock on the front page. Missed it by ttthhhhaaaatttt much.

They're searching for all that LSD just laying under the dirt that will fund they're next dig!

For what a lost doobie?

Lol...do the Baby-boomers really want them to know?? We need to stop this! 😂

Totally digging this! 😏😉

Was there did that

Dont eat the brown acid!

i hope they don't find the brown acid.

I suppose they just have nothing better to do.........

Pull tabs..a few coins?

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21 hours ago

Archaeology Magazine

The Door of No Return in Benin’s coastal town of Ouidah is a monument to some one million enslaved people forced there onto boats to European colonies.

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6881-trenches-benin-ouidah

(Rachel Carbonell/Alamy Stock Photo)
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The Door of No Return in Benin’s coastal town of Ouidah is a monument to some one million enslaved people forced there onto boats to European colonies. 

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6881-trenches-benin-ouidah

(Rachel Carbonell/Alamy Stock Photo)

 

Comment on Facebook

Had not heard of this. Where were the European colonies?

Herman Melville s "Benito Cereno" ( 1855)...A novel worth to be read...Slaves on board...-

What of that of Elmina,Cape coast, Dixcove, and Axim, Kwesi Ata Bosumfie, Black Star Coast, Gulfo de Guinea Atlántico,

Caroline, read this and weep. Not that I want you to weep, indeed quite the contrary. But I thought you would want to know about the resources there to interpret the past. It sounds like they are doing what they can to keep the memory alive.

I saw documentary on it

Joseph Roberson

Not to forget Africans sold by their brothers.

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Archaeologists working in the ancient city of Philippopolis in what is now southern Bulgaria have uncovered a 30-foot stretch of the Cardo Maximus, or main street.

archaeology.org/news/6892-180813-bulgaria-philippopolis-odeon

(Realsteel007, via Wikimedia Commons)
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Archaeologists working in the ancient city of Philippopolis in what is now southern Bulgaria have uncovered a 30-foot stretch of the Cardo Maximus, or main street. 

archaeology.org/news/6892-180813-bulgaria-philippopolis-odeon

(Realsteel007, via Wikimedia Commons)

 

Comment on Facebook

What a sight from the new buildings next to the ancient ruins!

Wow

my town is the best

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A collection of eight ancient artifacts, including 5,000-year-old ceramics bearing cuneiform inscriptions, have been seized from an antiquities dealer in London and repatriated to Iraq, based upon identifications made by scholars at the British Museum.

archaeology.org/news/6893-180813-iraq-repatriated-artifact

(British Museum)
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A collection of eight ancient artifacts, including 5,000-year-old ceramics bearing cuneiform inscriptions, have been seized from an antiquities dealer in London and repatriated to Iraq, based upon identifications made by scholars at the British Museum. 

archaeology.org/news/6893-180813-iraq-repatriated-artifact

(British Museum)

 

Comment on Facebook

Like the Hobby Lobby owner. Stealing artifacts (and buying stolen artifacts) should mean an automatic prison sentence.

Quero ver a repatriação da coleção egípcia do Museu britânico de volta pro Egito e as outras coleções referentes a países africanos e latino-americanos também!

would like to know what the cones were for.

Look what happened to all that history when Saddam ruled. All those artifacts either stolen or destroyed in the museums, not to mention the Buddhas. For once, it was lucky that so many countries had snitched artifacts or they also would have been lost.

That's one piece returned. I hope that the authorities continue to find more of these stolen pieces, return them to their rightful places, and prosecute the thieves.

It has been fifteen years since U.S. forces toppled Saddam Hussein, ushering in a period of instability that led to the plunder of Iraqi museums. Those same Americans who ignored pleas to secure museums. Since then, about 7,000 plundered artefacts have been returned, but about 8,000 are still lost. And that’s only counting the items that were stolen from museums. After the invasion, thousands of other artefacts were taken directly out of the ground at archaeological sites. In most cases, their whereabouts are unknown.

Thieves. I hope they can back everything that was stolen.

Sure they’ll be safe there lol

Where they may well be stolen and sold to another black market dealer

If you’ve been to Iraq, then you’ll understand why nothing is safe in Iraq. Everything is for sale. Every place smells like a sewer. Every official, no matter what level, is for sale.

While the antiquities trade is a bane to archeological science, returning artifacts to an unstable country where looting of museums and remains is rife and which is frequently sweep by factions that want to sell these items or turn them into powder is unlikely to end well.

i remember well the museums being looted before the 'conflict' was even over.

Great decision, I'm 100% convinced they won't be stolen and sold or disappear or be smashed to pieces by some religious lunatics.

They will sell it to someone else... 😤

Seems like, if it’s OK for one group to own things like this, it should be OK for any group.

Nathan Drake, you went too far

Awesome!

These people are robbing the world. They should be put to death.

Good those bloody backs have stolen so much

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Chemical analysis conducted on several of over 1,500 volcanic basalt tools discovered during excavations of Easter Island's famed moai carvings may give researchers an insight into how the Rapa Nui produced the nearly 1,000 statues.

archaeology.org/news/6891-180813-easter-island-tools

(Dale Simpson, Jr.)
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Chemical analysis conducted on several of over 1,500 volcanic basalt tools discovered during excavations of Easter Islands famed moai carvings may give researchers an insight into how the Rapa Nui produced the nearly 1,000 statues. 

archaeology.org/news/6891-180813-easter-island-tools

(Dale Simpson, Jr.)

 

Comment on Facebook

Ancient selfies doing ducklips.

I am afraid of that place, but yet I have always wanted to go there, but won't

I didn't realize there were so many as 1000 of these heads.

Will it be another cover up by the Smithsonian society though? Or will it be independently audited?

By a lot of hard work, I would imagine...duh

You need steel tools to work basalt

I love the look on this one's face, haha!

Kiki Lathrop

Nichole Meyer interesting

that's the pharoah

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From the Archives: Researchers working in the Russian High Arctic excavated the naturally mummified remains of a woman who lived some 800 years ago.

archaeology.org/issues/275-1711/from-the-trenches/6011-trenches-russia-arctic-mummy

(Institute of the Problems of Northern Development, SB RAS)
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From the Archives: Researchers working in the Russian High Arctic excavated the naturally mummified remains of a woman who lived some 800 years ago. 

archaeology.org/issues/275-1711/from-the-trenches/6011-trenches-russia-arctic-mummy

(Institute of the Problems of Northern Development, SB RAS)

 

Comment on Facebook

Looks more like a child.

She has such a sweet face. Most of these don't look so cute at all. She is almost Angelic

Sounds like a great way to revive plague or smallpox.

Where is the rest of her?

Where is the rest of the body?

800 year old Russian with current hairstyle 😛

Now doctors have to face great Witch Lady who got powers back after 800 yrs bcz of these doctors.

Doesn't look a day over 700.

Darn, wished I was there right now!

DO A DNA TEST PLEASE, SHE COULD BE ONE OF MY RELATIVES

Fascinating!

Institute of the Problems of Northern Development... ...now there's a think tank for the ages.

Looks like a child.

صرلا مقبوره تمانمية سنه وشعرها احلى من شعرك Abd

Looks like a doll, or a child. Very small head and features.

So tiny more like a babies head than a woman’s 🙁

It's like she is frozen in time,like we could know her.

So small....it looks like a childs face

She was beautiful!

Zack Schaap guud

Angela Abdilla

Preston

Michael

Shawn Brown

Don’t Blink

+ View previous comments

Excavations at a cave called Arene Candide in Italy’s northwestern Liguria region have offered unusual insight into how Paleolithic people buried their dead.

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6882-trenches-italy-paleolithic-burials

(Archives of the Soprintendenza Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio della Liguria - Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage)
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Excavations at a cave called Arene Candide in Italy’s northwestern Liguria region have offered unusual insight into how Paleolithic people buried their dead.

archaeology.org/issues/310-1809/trenches/6882-trenches-italy-paleolithic-burials

(Archives of the Soprintendenza Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio della Liguria - Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage)

 

Comment on Facebook

When did man turn from burial to cremation?

Perhaps the stone halves were remembrances of the dead by the living?

A 700-year-old octagonal tomb with a pyramid-shaped roof, which features murals depicting scenes from life under the Mongol Empire, has been discovered in northern China.

archaeology.org/news/6890-180810-china-octagon-tomb

(Chinese Cultural Relics)
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A 700-year-old octagonal tomb with a pyramid-shaped roof, which features murals depicting scenes from life under the Mongol Empire, has been discovered in northern China.  

archaeology.org/news/6890-180810-china-octagon-tomb

(Chinese Cultural Relics)

 

Comment on Facebook

wow it always amazes me when the paint is still so beautiful, for people who are supposed to be our inferior they certainly do amazing things.

Love this Magazine.... where else can a layperson be immersed in this information without being in rooms full of researchers. Nowhere...

Such wonderful art. The Chinese were cultured before the word was invented! Beautiful!

That's wonderful how the paintings are still clear even after 700 yrs

Punt has been found. Take a look at the stilt house reliefs, many have a 3 palm pattern. The left-hand palm is identical in curve to the arm extended in images of the king and queen of punt. Note that both the king and the queen point at the same position on the curve. A natural harbor. Just below St. Augustine, Florida. Note the palm shape again. Now... the right-hand palm. If the palm fronds are the Azores, and the curve of the shoal from the Azores is the palm itself. Then, you can quite easily see how Bermuda is indicated with the center palm, as well as an approximately scaled measure to the Islands of the Cuba Archipelago. Yes, new world narwhal ivory, new world myrrh is in Florida, several black woods, and gold? Ocean Voyage, Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor distance examples, and if the King and Queen of Punt aren't the most Native American looking Somalians you've ever seen in your life. Prove me wrong. Don't find the fish in Florida waters from the stilt house sketches. You'll believe it more if you find them there yourself.

Beautiful artwork and the colours still look amazing x

Shapes and tombs are created in the east and forlong storys about expanded through our riotous ways and knowledge to build and manufacture the higher powers gifts... Let's not mention the samuri real story of being able to dimension exchanges and release portals that the west copied and try to make their own...^^|^^><

Really amazing how well it has persevered all these years.

Bob, check this out!!

Wow

Ravishing

Incredible find........

Stunning!

that looks incredible !!!

Beautiful!!

Beautiful.

VERY interesting!!!

So beautiful

more photos!!!

wonderful!

Pristine!

Siegrun Maas

Thomas Dekowski

How cool!!

+ View previous comments

Homo erectus—generally considered the first human species to expand beyond the African continent—may have been unable to plan ahead, according to evidence recovered from a camp site in Saudi Arabia.

archaeology.org/news/6889-180810-homo-erectus-extinction

(ANU)
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Homo erectus—generally considered the first human species to expand beyond the African continent—may have been unable to plan ahead, according to evidence recovered from a camp site in Saudi Arabia. 

archaeology.org/news/6889-180810-homo-erectus-extinction

(ANU)

 

Comment on Facebook

I work in Saudi Arabia and can confirm that nothing has changed 😃

They definitely didn't plan on becoming extinct

Planning gives the enemy time to figure out what you are doing. When you don't know,they can't possible know 😉

There a lot of people in the world today with the same can't think past right now problem. The rest of us carry them out of sympathy instead of letting the darwin awards come to them. I'm not talking about poor or down trodden. Its the stupid, and we let it propegate.

so.. basically like a lot of people I know now..

Imagine, being able to conjecture so much from a few rocks,

Listen that's nothing, they still can't .

I heard they were always late and never had any food in their ice cave. Now I know why....

He had a nose, he followed his nose. What most of us still do. As for extinction, wrong place, wrong time is all it takes, just bad luck.

A few around here in Oz still employing the “Least effort strategy”.

That’s a very vague description.

Thought for a second that was a still from Jurassic Park

Me too. A bunch.

china , every thing is made in china

That's quite a bit of inference.

Neanderthal.sapien and Homosapien.sapien (sapien means thinking man) were able to think in spacial terms; which, in turn, means visualizing ahead in time and also aware of their demise. This was huge advancement. Excuse some of the spelling as FB and I are doing our usual battle regarding words. The discoveries of pre-humans are not always going to be an "OMG a new one!" It took millions of years to develop tool making. This guy could just be in the middle of one of the processional stages.

It me

It's too bad that Coursera wasn't around then. I think they offer a course about how to do that.

still doesn't

Teenagers have the same problem.

Agreed, not much as changed...

well, history repeats itself even now...

Yes... Monkeys don't reason so we'll...

Ha! Bad science!

Kimber Allen, you might find this interesting.

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A mosaic made of pebbles has been discovered within the site of a bathhouse in the ancient city of Ambracia, which is located in northwestern Greece.

archaeology.org/news/6888-180810-greece-pebble-mosaic

(Ephorate of Antiquities in Arta)
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A mosaic made of pebbles has been discovered within the site of a bathhouse in the ancient city of Ambracia, which is located in northwestern Greece. 

archaeology.org/news/6888-180810-greece-pebble-mosaic

(Ephorate of Antiquities in Arta)

 

Comment on Facebook

Cthulhu remembered...

Hail hydra

finally, the origins of HYDRA unearthed! lol

Beautiful octopus mosaic!

Earliest evidence of decals to keep one from slipping in the bath???

How did they know about our lord And our saivour ?

Are you going on to Greece from Japan?

Hail hydra lmao

They were touched by his noodly appendage, it’s a pastafarian temple!

Specter!

Terry Kovalcik...made me think of you.

I came here looking for “hail HYDRA” comments and was not disappointed. 😆

I love mosaics so much! It's an art form that I would love to explore!

Ktulu!

Ivan Francesca un polpaccio greco! 🐙

Quintapus !

Awesome!!

Wow I love mosaic art ^_^ amazing ^_^

Octopus mosaic

Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

Very cool

a pentapus. Love him!

How exquisite a shot!!✨💕

Show ❣

Nice big Octopus ! (y) 🙂

+ View previous comments

The Hyksos, a people from western Asia who immigrated to Egypt and then ruled the country for a century, may have helped usher in Egypt’s most prosperous era.

archaeology.org/issues/309-1809/features/6855-egypt-hyksos-foreign-dynasty

(De Agostini Picture Library/G. Sioen/ Bridgeman Images)
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The Hyksos, a people from western Asia who immigrated to Egypt and then ruled the country for a century, may have helped usher in Egypt’s most prosperous era.

archaeology.org/issues/309-1809/features/6855-egypt-hyksos-foreign-dynasty

(De Agostini Picture Library/G. Sioen/ Bridgeman Images)

 

Comment on Facebook

Migrated, not immigrated.

I think I'm unfairly biased toward the Hyksos because River God by Wilbur Smith was one of my favorite books for many years.

Were they also know as the Habiru ?

Joseph.

Samantha Kay Hyksos forever

They never learned the art of perspective though. What's with all the two dimensional drawings for gods sake?! ...and every single person is exactly the same height!!! Ancient people drive me crazy!

Gijs Jochems oooh deze bedoelde je 😉

What ? OK. The 18th only came to power because they went to war against them . They kicked them out of Egypt.

Interesting read! Isn’t there a theory that Ramses origins are also from SW Asia and his descendants were Red haired?

Origin of the biblical Exodus story.

Giselle Monroee

Siegrun Maas

Mikey Hall

Alyssa Ross

if it was the hykos, then where does joseph's period fall into, or is his household refered to as the hykos

Egyptian chronology is wrong the Hyksos were the Amalekites

They actually emigrated.

They were followers of Baal, i.e. semitic people.

Love that magazine.

steppe pastoralists people.

people come on,.we all notice the similar traits between the so called jews and hyksos.i dot deny them except the false etymology of shepherd kings ,the current version is much more accurate. they arent jews for at least two reasons, first cause bible has nothing to do with real history and was written more than 1000 years after the hyksos, and second cause in the time of hyksos the jews didn t exist. the more interestin enigma still is the fact that some simple shepherds from levant as were many came to one of the greatest civilizations and conquered it ,giving it serious improvement in weaponry and military technologies. there is a hypothesis that explain this by having the hitites ruling the hyksos. its interesting and logical . but still just a hypothesis. if someone knows more on this subject, it will be nice to write it here ,i think for his own prestige also ,and i would be grateful of course, but i dont consider this the greatest stimulus

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Beneath the floorboards of Westminster Abbey’s triforium, an arcaded gallery that sits some 70 feet above the church’s main aisle, archaeologists have discovered artifacts spanning more than seven centuries.

archaeology.org/issues/303-1807/features/6685-westminster-abbey-triforium-excavation

(James Brittain-VIEW/Alamy Stock Photo)
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Beneath the floorboards of Westminster Abbey’s triforium, an arcaded gallery that sits some 70 feet above the church’s main aisle, archaeologists have discovered artifacts spanning more than seven centuries. 

archaeology.org/issues/303-1807/features/6685-westminster-abbey-triforium-excavation

(James Brittain-VIEW/Alamy Stock Photo)

 

Comment on Facebook

but why that shape is the million dollar question

Could you, please, use also SI units so that also people living outside the US can understand? Thank you!

70 ft is about 21 meters There was a brief push back in the 1970s where the US was going to go to the metric system. Kids started learning the system in school, Coke and other soda type drinks were being sold in 1 and 2 liter bottles... The push quickly died out mainly (I believe) because the manufacturing industry said it would be too expensive to re-tool all of their machines. Sadly, about the only thing left from that push is that we still have 2 liter bottles of coke and wine in 750 ml bottles and other metric sizes. Will we ever switch over like Canada did? Probably not, but some of us have learned it anyway because of travel and I also worked for a Swiss company.

Visited the new gallery in June. Awesome views and great exhibits. Well worth the extra £5.

Sue Phillips remember this??

Leen Mahayni Westminster 😍

£5 is roughly $6.60 right now. I visited the gallery just a couple of weeks ago and it is definitely worth the cost. The abbey doesn’t advertise it right though IMO. It’s over near poets corner and there’s a velvet rope and a priest but it looks like a doorway that is supposed to be off limits. Even thought there’s a little sign saying Queens Golden Jubilee exhibit. I had looked forward to seeing it but had to ask someone where it was.

I understand the museum part, but when you have a building that old, leave it unless it’s to reforify it. I’d like some things to remain as they were for history’s sake.

Fascinating. We need to go back Jessica and Courtney!

Explain ''discovered''

See Britt Ann, it is interesting !

i mean even though it looks like a bullet, why that shape not because it looks like a bullet.

So amazing! I always wanted to be an archaeologist, how I wish I could be involved with this!

We just visited the gallery a week ago. Fascinating!!!

Now that's Gothic!

This was on TV. As I like to say, I read it on TV.

I was there in 1992 what a sight to see - had no idea there was access to an upper level where people used to go

Such an amazing place!

In my dream...one day to be there...

Sell it all and feed the poor

Spectacular

Interesting read

Teresa Brodsky Ohler, this looks like something you’d like!

Super cool.

Built by Catholics

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Delegate Program
The Delegate Program is Nassim Haramein's course in Unified Physics. Six modules cover in depth information that is sure to change your World View! We highly recommend it to anyone wanting to go deeper into understanding where we are and how we got here from a new perspective. www.Resonance.isResonanceAcademy250
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