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Archaeology Magazine updated their cover photo.

One of a group of 1st-century-B.C. Roman mosaics from a settlement in southern France called Ucetia that are, at present, the earliest to have been discovered in the region. They mark a major departure from what would have been found in simpler, preexisting Celtic dwellings.

To read more about excavations at Ucetia, subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

To read online articles from the November/Decemer 2017 issue, go to archaeology.org/issues

(Courtesy Denis Gliksman/INRAP)
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One of a group of 1st-century-B.C. Roman mosaics from a settlement in southern France called Ucetia that are, at present, the earliest to have been discovered in the region. They mark a major departure from what would have been found in simpler, preexisting Celtic dwellings.

To read more about excavations at Ucetia, subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

To read online articles from the November/Decemer 2017 issue, go to archaeology.org/issues

(Courtesy Denis Gliksman/INRAP)

Ilaria Calabrese, Nurul Hasan and 23 others like this

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Bev CampbellDefinitely a case of " the eye of the beholder". Given the intricacy of Celtic design I couldn't even imagine what they decorated their homes with. Could you ?

19 hours ago
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Book ReadersWhat success is greater than understanding Love (within your Human Nature pattern) validly? Love is a continual belief in the variable choice as Hope (not its result) for Happiness. Selflessly, Ps. Hope1st and 2nd Love are a combination that is cyclical in nature and dependent on the other to materialize Happiness 3rd in your life! Therefore, Hope's limit is Love which both limit you to Happiness! _Human Nature pattern/code www.facebook.com/91040836349/photos/a.10154474712156350.1073741829.91040836349/10154474712346350/...

18 hours ago
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Alicia Yearsleymany blessings such a great person lvu Great Uncle Richard RIP

15 hours ago
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Kenneth RoseKathy Steinheimer - thought you might find this interesting.

16 hours ago
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Mona Brookshow cool

14 hours ago
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Annoushka GastiAutrement dit Uzès !

22 hours ago
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Aleksander H. FiskumMorten N Høines Celts and Romans!

22 hours ago
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Anna McPherson ParrJames

11 hours ago   ·  1
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Alexandre SallesAntônio Cabral

21 hours ago
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Courtney Hammond JonesRachel Renee Tokoly Jones

5 hours ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

18 hours ago
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People walking on the beach at Forlorn Point, pictured below, in County Wexford, Ireland after Storm Ophelia discovered skeletal remains that forensic anthropologists believe may date to the Iron Age.

archaeology.org/news/6034-171019-ireland-skeletal-remains

(Kevin Higgins, via Wikimedia Commons)
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People walking on the beach at Forlorn Point, pictured below, in County Wexford, Ireland after Storm Ophelia discovered skeletal remains that forensic anthropologists believe may date to the Iron Age. 

archaeology.org/news/6034-171019-ireland-skeletal-remains

(Kevin Higgins, via Wikimedia Commons)

Dickie Lee Padilla, Shirley Radcliffe Kulcheski and 23 others like this

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Janne GeuensThe phrasing makes me laugh a bit. 'After Storm Ophelia discovered..' As if she's just blowing over the country and has the awareness to suddenly stop and go: ' oh golly, bones!' I'm being funny, of course :D. A great discovery.

22 hours ago   ·  11

4 Replies

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Jason Eatwellit never ceases to amaze me, just how many times humans have covered every square inch of this earth. Those people's lives had been entirely forgotten, until now....

21 hours ago   ·  9
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Dmf ForresterDoes Archaeology Magazine not have anyone who knows the proper structure of a sentence? Do they not have proof readers? I was seriously looking hard at the picture to find the "people walking on the beach ... pictured below". Misplaced commas can seriously misdirect the reader. Waste of time and makes some feel the article itself might be just as misleading.

13 hours ago   ·  2
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Justin HechtThe article mentioned in the link has more pictures. Here's the original article irishpost.co.uk/iron-age-skeletal-remains-discovered-on-irish-coast-after-storm-ophelia/

18 hours ago   ·  7
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Hayley DoyleOh, That's Great!! I'm In Ireland Next Week!!

9 hours ago
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Fleetwood Warner RangeThe storm giveth and the storm taketh away.

21 hours ago   ·  1
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Robert Dick-clelandshame theres no photos or ven hints of what was found

18 hours ago   ·  1
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Nancy Adney-GuenthnerThe picture says nothing..!

11 hours ago
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Kyla Faulkner-BergenMeg Faulkner-Fleming Ooooooo!

22 hours ago

1 Reply

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Joyce-Marie MorrinCiara Doherty Colón Fiona Montgomery Paul Doherty

22 hours ago   ·  1
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M Carmen Gonlz-DelgadoAlex Delgado

22 hours ago   ·  1
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

18 hours ago   ·  1
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Jan van DijkJan Van Dijk

2 hours ago   ·  1
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Danielle ClarkLouisa Clark Koistinen whoa

16 hours ago

1 Reply

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Tuzigoot National Monument, the ruins of a 110-room pueblo built around 1,000 years ago by a pre-Columbian culture known as the Sinagua, sits on a desert ridge in Arizona’s Verde Valley.

archaeology.org/issues/275-1711/from-the-trenches/6013-trenches-arizona-tuzigoot-national-monument

(George H.H. Huey / Alamy Stock Photo)
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Tuzigoot National Monument, the ruins of a 110-room pueblo built around 1,000 years ago by a pre-Columbian culture known as the Sinagua, sits on a desert ridge in Arizona’s Verde Valley.

archaeology.org/issues/275-1711/from-the-trenches/6013-trenches-arizona-tuzigoot-national-monument

(George H.H. Huey / Alamy Stock Photo)

Marijke Hermans, Markmathushan Mathushan and 23 others like this

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Daryl NobleWhen I was an undergrad I studied in Arizona a while through Northern Arizona University at Flagstaff. Did some excavation at a Sinagua pueblo. Back then, and we're going back 40 years, the thinking was after the eruption of Sunset Craters, that event created favorable conditions for farming and the area experienced a kind of prehistoric land rush. Had some great times down that way. Broke, livin in an attic, riding my Harley. Picked up at a rodeo school some. Long ago and far away.

23 hours ago   ·  11

2 Replies

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Darrell RobertsWow, I wonder what it was like back then. It must've been very peaceful and simple, aside from the occasional raiding party that came through. It was probably very nice compared to today's hectic lifestyle.

21 hours ago   ·  2
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Ed GriggsLove this place Rob Hooper, the whole area is rich in wildlife, archeological sites, great restaurants, camping areas!

11 hours ago   ·  1
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John GambleSinagua ....no water ..... People leave......

1 day ago
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Andrea DanielBeautiful spot. When people worry about losing National Monuments, this is what they are talking about.

16 hours ago   ·  3
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Dorislee RaffertyWe have enjoyed visiting Tuzigoot several times. So very interesting.

22 hours ago
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David W. BondSinagua = without water ?

19 hours ago
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Frederic R. PampCool place -- near Sedona and uncrowded.

24 hours ago
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Lynette GrahamBeen there a couple of times, love seeing it from this angle.

24 hours ago
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Lisa CherryIt's a beautiful site and the view is wonderful.

18 hours ago
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Bonnie McKeeLoved the views from there. Interesting place.

17 minutes ago
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Lorelei GarlandAs a young kid I walked on top of these walls

13 hours ago
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Dorothy GergenThanks will look into it and see if we can go see it

16 hours ago
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Gayle VirginJohn de Bry now this is a big community

22 hours ago   ·  1
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Priscilla RattrayMichael Habib.. have you two spent time here?

10 hours ago

1 Reply

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Audrey SheldonBetty Bown, check this out!

24 hours ago
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Cici Paluhlove Tuzigoot.

1 day ago
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Greg Scott ShipmanWe'll leave a light on

23 hours ago
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Christine PietrandreaWow! !

11 hours ago
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Terry FrazierAwesome!

24 hours ago
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Samuel GroseWow!!!

23 hours ago
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Betty BownOh that is amazing!

18 hours ago
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Janet GrahamHaven’t been here yet.

19 hours ago
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Judy Lynn Baileywow

24 hours ago
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Victoria Budesa#fbf Duncan Stirke🙂🙂

23 hours ago

1 Reply

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Archaeologists investigating the Army training center at Fort McCoy have uncovered more than 30 .30-caliber blank cartridges and metal ammunition belt links dating to the early 1980s.

archaeology.org/news/6032-171019-wisconsin-army-training

(U.S. Army)
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Archaeologists investigating the Army training center at Fort McCoy have uncovered more than 30 .30-caliber blank cartridges and metal ammunition belt links dating to the early 1980s. 

archaeology.org/news/6032-171019-wisconsin-army-training

(U.S. Army)

Chris Bood, Marc Ashcroft Sant and 23 others like this

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Frederic R. PampCommon objects with a known use, only 30 years old, found at a place where they could be expected. Is this archeology or just picking up litter?

2 days ago   ·  133

7 Replies

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Sean FarmerNext article: Archeologists digging through the leaves next to a roadside rest area discover paper wrappers believed to have once been used to wrap hamburgers from a well know fast food chain.

2 days ago   ·  65

4 Replies

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Jim Bilodeau1980's? You should go on the quest for the lost tomb of ancient God "Pac - Man", I heard people use to worship at small shrines by depositing metal coins. 🙂 -kidding you people do a great job.

2 days ago   ·  48

5 Replies

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Frank SandorLC is a division of Remington and didn’t start production until the 1940’s so 1980’s is unfortunately not a typo. Thank you for letting me know that archaeologists are now studying my teen years. I can’t wait to read the article about how paleontologists are studying my old dog. Seriously, I expected a higher editorial standard from this magazine.

2 days ago   ·  23

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Bruce LaneIf you ran a metal detector over the field training areas of any US Army base you could find thousands of discarded belts of ammo, tossed aside by people who didn't feel like carrying extra ammo during training that they weren't going to get to fire.

2 days ago   ·  14

2 Replies

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Joshua Anthony VillegasOooohhhh! This reminds me of the time as a kid I was digging in my backyard and found half a Stretch Armstrong! Seriously, this is archaeological news? Maybe we can study them to see how vastly they differ from the bullets of today!?

2 days ago   ·  9
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Kevin LerouxIs it April 1? I fail to understand the significance. I've probably got some stellar 1980s stuff underneath my bed or in my closet if you're interested. A few Papermate pens, an old Trapper Keeper and perhaps a Rubik's Cube knock-off. I shall begin mapping it out right away.

2 days ago   ·  4
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Robert MarkI hope the archaeologists weren't picking up live blank rounds. Some adult should have contacted EOD. Yeah I know only blank rounds but if the archaeologists thought they qualified as artifacts I'm not sure they understand how to safely handle them.

2 days ago   ·  4

4 Replies

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Matthew Cappettawhen you post dumb stuff like this it actually undermines archaeology as a field of study. read these comments, when the only thing hundreds of people think about arch in a day is "why are these idiots recording this...MUCH LESS BRAGGING ABOUT IT ONLINE?!" look at all these shares about something that's not even an actual cultural resource. idiotic

2 days ago   ·  5
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Chris Uhl30 spent rounds from the 80's is considered archaeological gold now? I bet I could find more spent casings in my backyard. Maybe I should go find them and sell them on eBay for say $25 per spent shell?

2 days ago   ·  4
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Scott BlackwellSrsly? This is archaeology? 🤣 If they start looking at Ft McClellan or Pelham Range, I could show them several areas to find similar "artifacts", and even tell them in detail how they got there!

18 hours ago
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Wayne VronaJust last week I properly disposed of 2 boxes of .270 ammo I found in a box in my garage, leftover from my hunting days in Montana. Please don't tell me I disturbed an archeological site in my garage.

2 days ago   ·  4

1 Reply

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Ahmed NabilHah... 30 year has nothing to do with archeology... come in we have spoons here in Egypt dated 600 years old and still used to serve tea and coffee in cairo historic cafes 😀

12 hours ago   ·  1
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Erik FinnertyI hope that some archaeologists unearths my Garbage Pail Kid sticker covered Star Wars lunchbox that is full of GI Joe figures. Been looking for it for a few years myself.

1 day ago   ·  1
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Stuart FreemanI found some of those at Camp Pendelton during a boy scout jamboree there about 1976. Took them home, and my dad fired off one round from an old Sears bought 1895 Winchester rifle we have. The round got stuck when it heated up after firing, and it was hard to extract so we just fired off the one round.

2 days ago   ·  2
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Patrick SpenceOnly in America would anyone even think this post would interest someone. When Ammosexuals attack. Lmao

2 days ago   ·  5

6 Replies

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Clayton CryselSo you find spent brass and related items at an training facility. You know what that tells me? Someone got away with not policing their brass lol

2 days ago   ·  3
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David GilmourA short course in military procurement budgets with respect to ammo: Each unit down to battalion level is allocated X amount of ammo to expend in training exercises. At the end of the fiscal year they count the remaining ammo, and reduce the following year's budget accordingly. This leads to reduced ammo for training every year, which is a problem for company commanders. Therefore, the First Law of ammo supply sergeants is Never Return Unused Ammo. See where this is going? Also, why I dislike working on military bases.

2 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Francis DipRly you guys are printing this, I can give you locations of a lot I mean lot more stuff like this at a few bases I was at, this is nothing

2 days ago   ·  3
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Jeff Sheryl CraneI used to collect spent 30 cal along with the links at Bellows training grounds, Hawaii, in the 50's. I had long bandoliers of these things! To a kid, pretty cool stuff!

2 days ago   ·  1
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Cheryl KegganUmmm. I'm sitting looking at two dozen ancient stone arrowheads and a flint knife........that's an archaeological find. Brass from the 80s I can find in my father's closet, my son has Soviet brass that old. This is the least "newsworthy piece I can imagine you ever publishing. Please try harder....

1 day ago   ·  1
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Bryan RoyWow i know 1980 was a few years ago but I’m not seeing this as an outstanding finding. I found some shoes the other day that were from 1972. Newsworthy?

2 days ago   ·  3
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Jeff HrzinaWow. At first, I assumed it was a typo, but clicking on the link does actually take you to an article about finding spent cartridges from the 1980s. Then I figured that it must be a joke/satire article (ala 'The Onion') but wrong again - it's the real deal. What am I missing here?

2 days ago   ·  1
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Jason GrahamWho knew misplaced training equipment is such a big deal. My professors never mentioned that when I was getting my archaeology degree. Maybe the magazine could pay me for going back to Fort Lost in the Woods and digging up all the crap my platoon lost during our night assault course at the end of basic training.

1 day ago   ·  1
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Paul CarrollCheck with the Ashley Forest Service. We did some metal detecting a few years back and came up with a lot of shells and some lead from the 1880s at Fort Thornburgh's shooting range. My brother mentions seeing lots of gatling gun shells over at Fort Duchesne during work there (although they should be covered up at this point in time).

2 days ago   ·  1
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Comment on Facebook

Analysis of the thighbone of a 40,000-year-old skeleton discovered in China’s Tianyuan Cave indicates that “Tianyuan Man” was a modern human carrying only four to five percent of his DNA from Neanderthals, and no detectable DNA inherited from the Denisovans. It had originally been thought that Tianyuan Man was the offspring of a Neanderthal and a modern human.

archaeology.org/news/6031-171019-genome-tianyuan-man

(Qiaomei Fu)
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Analysis of the thighbone of a 40,000-year-old skeleton discovered in China’s Tianyuan Cave indicates that “Tianyuan Man” was a modern human carrying only four to five percent of his DNA from Neanderthals, and no detectable DNA inherited from the Denisovans. It had originally been thought that Tianyuan Man was the offspring of a Neanderthal and a modern human. 

archaeology.org/news/6031-171019-genome-tianyuan-man

(Qiaomei Fu)

Kosei Kito, Kathy Edmonds and 23 others like this

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Nara AkiraAncient original Japanese had prevailed firstly to American Continent. Newly found artefacts in Oregon and South America indicates that people firstly came to American continent through sea coast route of North Pacific Ocean Rim. They might have passed Beringia coast before Last Glacial Maximum era after starting from Hokkaido, North island of Japan in 30, youtu.be/BGrhO1ntyYo000 BP.

2 days ago   ·  7

10 Replies

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Mariotti Pier Luigio che discorso fate ?? se il 40 % è neanderthal l'altro 60% è moderno..come era stato ipotizzato sin dall'inizio !! Allora dove è il problema ?? Dalla traduzione non si riesce a capire nulla!

1 day ago
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Michelle O'NeedNot buying that. Isn’t 95% of our DNA related to all mammals, for example, a horse? How can only 5% be related to another Primate?

21 hours ago
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Vincent AlbertNeanderthals predominantly lived in Europe, and the near middle east (proto-european) with some eurasian crossover. However, this man pictured probably was 95% "like" neanderthal, and would be indistinguishable from neanderthal by modern terms. Same as modern Europeans. Out of Africa is real, but only in terms of upright apes starting there.

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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John ArmbrustThis is good, but do you have something more interesting like, I dunno, some Army dummy ammo from 1980 found on an Army base? 😉

2 days ago   ·  10

5 Replies

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Luis CevallosThey took that poor skeleton to the Maury Show. Denisovian, you are NOT THE FATHER 🤣

2 days ago   ·  6
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Tim RobinsonHe didn't have a leg to stand on

2 days ago   ·  2
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Wyn NicholsI find the term modern human curious.

2 days ago

3 Replies

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Jo Ann NelsonHuman beings continue to learn....

2 days ago
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Judith Sperber AltmanAlways amazing details at this site!

2 days ago   ·  2
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Adam HallSeems like modern human coexisted with many of our supposed ancestors

2 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Petko SlavovIt's very confusing. Why is that 4-5% Neanderthal genes is not considered a lot? Sounds like pretty much to me.

2 days ago   ·  1

8 Replies

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Marie Elise Horrell LeCourPossibly one of my ancestors! I have a good amount of Neanderthal in me. More than my husband has.

2 days ago

6 Replies

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Amy PumpkinheadYvonne Fu, i thought this article might interest you

2 days ago   ·  1
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Mary MulrooneyHow tall do they calculate he was?

2 days ago
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Nicolas Paul Jules LarcierEst sa se prend pour des pro un coup c'est sa un autre c'est si pfff y vous font avaler n'importe quoi sérieux

2 days ago
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Bob Tallonso Japanese were nomads then ?

2 days ago
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Caterina-Joseph LillisCool

2 days ago
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Win KieSo ? Whats the hypotheseis

2 days ago
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Johnny N Bobbi BrooksHmmmm

2 days ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

2 days ago   ·  1
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Jacquilen RothHaylee Allen

2 days ago   ·  1
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Comment on Facebook

DNA analysis has offered new insights into the species of livestock used to make medieval parchment manuscripts as well as which pages of the manuscripts were used most frequently.

archaeology.org/issues/275-1711/from-the-trenches/6014-trenches-england-york-gospel-dna

(© Chapter of York)
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DNA analysis has offered new insights into the species of livestock used to make medieval parchment manuscripts as well as which pages of the manuscripts were used most frequently.

archaeology.org/issues/275-1711/from-the-trenches/6014-trenches-england-york-gospel-dna

(© Chapter of York)

Duy Phuoc Nguyen, Rebecca Pierce and 23 others like this

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Todd FinlayOkay, this ability to research the past is getting scary good.

2 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Virginia McMahonInteresting

1 day ago
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Janet FollandJasmin Folland

2 days ago
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#OTD in 1781, the Continental Army and allied French forces won victory over General Cornwallis and the British at the Battle of Yorktown. Earlier this year, artifacts from the period just after the British surrender were uncovered in Gloucester Point, Virginia, just across the York River.

archaeology.org/news/5220-170123-virginia-yorktown-surrender

(Public Domain)
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#OTD in 1781, the Continental Army and allied French forces won victory over General Cornwallis and the British at the Battle of Yorktown. Earlier this year, artifacts from the period just after the British surrender were uncovered in Gloucester Point, Virginia, just across the York River. 

archaeology.org/news/5220-170123-virginia-yorktown-surrender

(Public Domain)

Tom Holliday, Tulip Tammi and 23 others like this

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Francisco Gonzalez"#OTD in 1781,the combined French naval and land forces, with the assistance of allied American Continental Army units, won victory over General Cornwallis and the British at the Battle of Yorktown" There, corrected the caption for you!

2 days ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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Steven CorradiAnd now it seems maybe the Brits were right about us not being ready for self rule.

1 day ago
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Tommy HubbardCool.

2 days ago   ·  3
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Michelle MinutoElise Patrick Jon you were there

2 days ago   ·  1
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Comment on Facebook

Excavators have uncovered two nineteenth-century copper alloy stamps and about 30 pages of charred document fragments at the site of the old Parliament of the United Province of Canada in Montreal, which was destroyed by fire during a riot on April 25, 1849.

archaeology.org/news/6030-171018-montreal-old-parliament

(John Hugh Ross, Public Domain)
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Excavators have uncovered two nineteenth-century copper alloy stamps and about 30 pages of charred document fragments at the site of the old Parliament of the United Province of Canada in Montreal, which was destroyed by fire during a riot on April 25, 1849. 

archaeology.org/news/6030-171018-montreal-old-parliament

(John Hugh Ross, Public Domain)

Vkas Rajput, Anastasia Delécolle and 23 others like this

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Donald Stephens😮 They had a riot in Canada? Inconceivable!

3 days ago   ·  5

1 Reply

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MaryJo Heibel RegierCon Campbell. Cool, is it not?

3 days ago   ·  1
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David WebberSam copper

3 days ago
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Kara SoarasChristine Stanton

3 days ago   ·  1
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Laura WowkBob Bailie

3 days ago
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A wooden sculpture thought to represent the head of Egyptian Queen Ankhnespepy II, who ruled as regent for her young son after the death of Pepy I, around 2350 B.C., has been discovered near her pyramid at Saqqara.

archaeology.org/news/6028-171018-egypt-wooden-sculpture

(Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities)
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A wooden sculpture thought to represent the head of Egyptian Queen Ankhnespepy II, who ruled as regent for her young son after the death of Pepy I, around 2350 B.C., has been discovered near her pyramid at Saqqara.

archaeology.org/news/6028-171018-egypt-wooden-sculpture

(Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities)

Cherie Carter, Koos Wagenmakers and 23 others like this

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Maura O'BrienMaybe just the angle the picture is taken, but looking at the base I see a different kind of head. Was that designed or picture angle?

3 days ago   ·  8

1 Reply

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Amr EltebieThe head doesn't represent an Old Kingdom Queen. The earring and the facial features resemblance Amarna art.

3 days ago   ·  3

2 Replies

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Christine AspinallWow! Amazing sculpture. She was a beautiful woman if this sculpture is 'true to life'.

3 days ago   ·  3
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Diana Marie Watsonit looks like she was very beautiful! Obviously before the Ptolemys! LOL

3 days ago   ·  3
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Ruchi MahtoQueen Ankhesenpepy ll was one of the queen of 6th Dynasty nd 6th Dynasty was the last dynasty of Old Kingdom.

3 days ago   ·  3
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Amanda RothThat is not what I thought it was at first glance...

3 days ago   ·  2
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Stephanie RomigCool, still has a trace of paint colors on it

3 days ago
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Michael KozlikIf they had batteries back then I would say it was something else....

3 days ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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Helen ChappellI bet it had a wig and a lot of polychrome surface.

3 days ago
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Cliff AbrahartThey sell these wooden heads in stalls near the Pyramids and in Cairo.

3 days ago
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Kal NazariInteresting facial structure, it does not appear to be very African looking. [ adjusts glasses ]

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Judy Lynn Baileywow ' what a great find ' beautiful

3 days ago   ·  1
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Nancy Wagner JohnstoneLovely.

3 days ago
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Asia DozierLove it

3 days ago
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Dianne Edwardsbeautiful face........

3 days ago
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John GambleIts Agnes...

1 day ago
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Sylvie BougonBeautiful!

3 days ago
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Dennis HylandBlockhead!

2 days ago
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Jan PushorPretty

3 days ago
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Victor Toledo SelmanPeppie ?

3 days ago
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Elizabeth Agatha Knappertit's lovely

2 days ago
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Jorge Lopes<3

3 days ago
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Stefanie RobinsonBrandy Headlee this

3 days ago
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Debbie DeeWendy Nissen

3 days ago   ·  1
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Els PetersDieneke Creemers

3 days ago
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#OTD in 1867, the United States took possession of Alaska from Russia. 150 years later, many Indigenous Alaskans, such as the Yup’ik, are working to preserve their traditions while battling the rising sea levels and diminishing permafrost of a changing climate.

archaeology.org/issues/187-1509/features/3558-alaska-yupik-cultural-revival

(Courtesy Charlotta Hillerdal, University of Aberdeen)
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#OTD in 1867, the United States took possession of Alaska from Russia. 150 years later, many Indigenous Alaskans, such as the Yup’ik, are working to preserve their traditions while battling the rising sea levels and diminishing permafrost of a changing climate. 

archaeology.org/issues/187-1509/features/3558-alaska-yupik-cultural-revival

(Courtesy Charlotta Hillerdal, University of Aberdeen)

Anita Przybysz, Hoby Bonelli and 23 others like this

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Richard KosackAdapt or leave. This is a climate phase . There have been many over the millennia. Man-made pollution probably hastens the global warming, but is not responsible for all of it.

3 days ago   ·  9

1 Reply

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Josh AllenClimate Change politics is a progressive power grab. A way to increase government power and bureaucracy over people's lives. America economically will be at competitive disadvantage if progressives have their policies implemented.

2 days ago   ·  3

3 Replies

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John Harmatifunny about the sea levels..it has not changed 1inch around australia for over 100 years. sick of hearing about this crap. in theearly 90ies it was said that we be walking in foot deep seawater around parts of melbourne. never happened

3 days ago   ·  3
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Troy DuncanHad no idea an archaeology journal article about cultures adapting to climate change could some how be considered ‘political’.

2 days ago
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Mary ReckerThis is all sad. Everything the human race needed to survive was all around us on this planet. We have destroyed it with technology n progress. We destroy habitats, poison the water, create trash that kills numerous plants n animals. And for what purpose? Progress? There won't be a human race to preserve this planet if we keep killing it. Bees are dying. Without them not as many plants are being pollinated. We are not the superior ones. Animals n insects have survived millions of years n here we are killing everything. What's so superior about that?

2 days ago
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Patricia KelsallInteresting about the Moravian Missionaries, I live in Labrador (Canada) where the Moravians were the first missionaries to bring christianity to the Inuit here in the 1700’s

17 hours ago
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Mike BoutwellClimate change has happened many times in the earth's past...

3 days ago   ·  7

3 Replies

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Mike TitusHow did indigenous people do under Lenin? Stalin? Let's compare and contrast.

3 days ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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Terry CampbellIf it's melting, I guess it's not so permafrost.

2 days ago
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Paul WaldrepThis is bs The water levels at false pass are the same they was when I was 5

2 days ago
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Russell KochWeatherology experts now are we?

3 days ago
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Matthew TownsendClimate change is not global warming falsehood. It is getting colder before getting warmer.

3 days ago
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Craig BoothIf this site turns political that’s it for me

3 days ago   ·  1
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Dirk LanceRising sea levels. Ok.

3 days ago   ·  3
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Barb SmithNot buying it.

3 days ago   ·  4

1 Reply

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Charles E JohnsonYou just posted crap, so I am gone

3 days ago   ·  3

4 Replies

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David StewartHow are these two facts related....?

3 days ago
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Ellyn Parker-NealTy

3 days ago
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Trevor JaryUs bought Alaska from England for £1million ,what did Russia have to do with it .?

3 days ago
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Elisa PattersonHoneyandMe Vincent

3 days ago
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The Rosetta Stone, famous for its role in the translation of hieroglyphics, tells of the ruthless victory of Egypt’s pharaoh Ptolemy V over insurgents. Archaeologists recently uncovered evidence backing up its account of incidents from the Great Egyptian Revolt.

archaeology.org/issues/274-1711/features/5997-egypt-thmuis-rosetta-stone

(Copyright the Trustees of the British Museum)
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The Rosetta Stone, famous for its role in the translation of hieroglyphics, tells of the ruthless victory of Egypt’s pharaoh Ptolemy V over insurgents. Archaeologists recently uncovered evidence backing up its account of incidents from the Great Egyptian Revolt.

archaeology.org/issues/274-1711/features/5997-egypt-thmuis-rosetta-stone

(Copyright the Trustees of the British Museum)

Tom Holliday, Ruth Slates and 23 others like this

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Claude MassianiThe Rosetta stone was stolen by british sailors but nevertheless it'is a french guy, Champollion, who decrypted hieroglyphe.

3 days ago   ·  7

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Brian ThompsonThe story of Ptolemy v is itself interesting as Ptolemy is less interested in ruling as he was in pleasure. It was his capable advisors that got the Egyptian forces into shape to defeat the Greek forces of the Seleucids. The Egyptian victory gives Egyptians faith in their own abilities and they begin to turn on their Greek rulers.

3 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Cynthia HutchisonAny evidence of the recent theory that earthquakes were disturbing the Nile and Ptolemy went home to take care of it?.

3 days ago
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John MurphreeThe English took possession of this important stone from the French after Napoleon's surrender at Waterloo,,,now I'm the British Museum.

2 days ago
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Matthew J. SmithOften used to translate my handwriting. You have those times where you look at your own writing and say "Even I don't know what I wrote!"

2 days ago   ·  1
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Ales AtreidesHard to get photos of the stone at the museum. All the little entitled children shoving their way to the front ruin most good shots.

3 days ago

5 Replies

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Amichai Ben LeahWatch out now, there might be some "social justice" entity wanting to take from us this sacred text.

3 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Ahmed KhedrThe Rosetta stone was stolen like many others and the right place of it is Egypt

2 days ago   ·  1
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Raul V. EspinozaPlease send back all of Egypt's pilfered item's <>Just saying<>they are not yours<>

Attachment3 days ago   ·  4

4 Replies

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Stu BurnsMy shot of the Rosetta Stone - with my hat in the foreground. www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10155524438632527&set=a.10155515843787527.1073741833.611857526&ty...

2 days ago   ·  1
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Wanda Tinline ParsonsFinally got to see it at the British Museum last month.

3 days ago   ·  1
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Pilar VickI saw it at the British Museum, what a rush!

3 days ago
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Matt Harthow can copyright the rosetta stone??????????

3 days ago
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Eric AleducaÔ Great Jean-François Champollion, the world thanks you for creating a new science : Egyptology...

3 days ago
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Israel Benjamin EizykI have seen it in the british museum!

3 days ago
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Dava NelsonWatch the wonderful BBC series Egypt on Netflix. The Stone I think is episode 5.

3 days ago
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Yan BouchardJe suis allé voir l'obélisque de Champollion au Père Lachaise,Paris .....RIP.

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Tommy DesmondThink it was found by a soldier in Napoleons army Lyn.

2 days ago
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Khaldoun Shiliالترجمة قام بها ابن الوحشي في كتاب المستهام في معرفة رموز الاقلام وكا العادة تترجم هذه الكتب و يطلع علبها شمبليون وغيره وتنسب الاكتشافات للعنصر الاوربي بدل العربي

2 days ago
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Cliff AbrahartRevolting Egyptians. Didn't know that was some of the content.

3 days ago
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Susan EllisThe coolest artifact ever.

2 days ago
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Olivier TwistThis stone must be given on Louvre Muséum. Lol....

3 days ago

4 Replies

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Hubert De PaepeDiscover by Champilion in theme of Napoleon I

3 days ago
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Jeff KitchenSeen it at the British Museum !!!

3 days ago
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Naomi BroadheadWilliam Brown Zoe Martin Hilary Goldsmith Kim Loveridge Katy Brough an interesting article for you! 😊

3 days ago   ·  1
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Analysis of environmental data, including evidence from ice-core records of eruption dates and the Islamic Nilometer (an ancient history of Nile water levels), as well as Ancient Egyptian documentation of social unrest, suggests that a giant volcanic eruption in 44 B.C. may have contributed to the Roman victory over Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium in 30 B.C.

archaeology.org/news/6027-171017-egypt-volcano-nile

(M. Sigl)
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Analysis of environmental data, including evidence from ice-core records of eruption dates and the Islamic Nilometer (an ancient history of Nile water levels), as well as Ancient Egyptian documentation of social unrest, suggests that a giant volcanic eruption in 44 B.C. may  have contributed to the Roman victory over Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium in 30 B.C.

archaeology.org/news/6027-171017-egypt-volcano-nile

(M. Sigl)

Hoby Bonelli, กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Lou MaddogWhat a bizarre blurb you've written here... The battle was in 31 bc, it was primarily between Romans loyal to Octavian and Romans loyal to Marc Antony. Cleopatra funded this civil war for her own purposes, and provided a few war galleys and many more transports. www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-battle-of-actium So how do you imagine this eruption affected the outcome of this Roman battle. I suppose you're inferring the eruption affected the Nile inundation for several years which lead to famine and eventually a disease thought to be plague. True, but this had no effect on the battle of Actium. One shouldn't get ones non-climate history from climatologists... The note that this was a battle between Rome and Egypt perpetuates Octavian's propaganda ploy to disguise he was engaged in another of the seemingly endless Roman civil wars of the preceding 50 years. www.nature.com/articles/s41467-017-00957-y

4 days ago   ·  11

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Trevor Leeaccording to Octavian’s [Octavius, Otamus, Ri-Othamus, aka Eudaf,] propagandists, the lovers were then married, which violated the Roman law restricting Romans from marrying foreigners. Antony’s disastrous military campaign against Parthia in 36 B.C. further reduced his prestige, but in 34 B.C. he was more successful against Armenia.

3 days ago
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Trevor LeeHaos or Hayk, Haykhelios (Gaythelios Goidelic) the Patriarch of Armenia and Hyksos Kings that ruled Egyptaher the upper fatherlands. blood lines of Cleopatra could easy be from Armenia.

3 days ago
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Tracy LivezeyDidn’t “giant volcanic eruptions” with large-scale effects usually get documented by ancient chroniclers in one way or another?

4 days ago   ·  3

2 Replies

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Brandon MarquetteApparently the Global Warming brain washing has infected Archaeology magazine. I am here to inform Archaeology magazine that you are now on bad paper!

3 days ago   ·  1
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Ted DimofPish posh. Big deal. Pliney the Younger, the inspiration for Russian River Brewery’s awesome triple IPA that they only make I believe once a year, rushed to Mount Vesuvius and helped save a bunch of people from that massive earth ejaculation.

2 days ago
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Dmitri SemenovThe only thing that contributed to the victory of Romans over Cleopatra and Co. was military genuis of Romans and their leader

4 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Scott GrayWhy is it called an Islamic Nilometer if the Roman conquest happened nearly 700 years before the founding of Islam?

3 days ago

1 Reply

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Vladimir StissiI always thought Augustus' main opponent, and the one directing his own defeat, at Actium was Marc Antony... 🙂

4 days ago   ·  2
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Noah BroschThere could not be an "Islamic" Nilometer in 44 BCE. Islam started after 530 CE

3 days ago   ·  5
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Andrew LaleWas the 'Islamic nilometer' written by Imams? What makes it Islamic?

4 days ago   ·  1

10 Replies

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Riccardo de la PauYes, please, let's use the Guardian as a reliable source of information...

3 days ago
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Linda Taccia"may have"

4 days ago   ·  5

1 Reply

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Sebastião GomesFascinating

4 days ago   ·  1
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Miguël DaoustIce ice Baby

4 days ago   ·  1
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Carol Buckingham13 years out of whack!!

3 days ago
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Bill ColemanNeologisms again.

3 days ago
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Sabine SchwaighoferKlaus Michael Nedelko , kann das so gewesen sein?

3 days ago
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Victor Toledo SelmanIsabel Bendeck

3 days ago
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Mike JamrockSandra Jamrock

4 days ago   ·  1
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Nicole CarterTrevor Lee

3 days ago
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Gabriela Domené LópezDanni Pearce

4 days ago
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Lauren O'HanlonKaeli Lalor

4 days ago
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Archaeologists suggest that a small silver artifact found at Borgring Viking fortress near Køge in eastern Denmark may be missing from an elaborate box brooch found in a woman’s grave at Fyrkat fortress in Hobro, over 100 miles away.

archaeology.org/news/6026-171017-denmark-silver-box

(Nationalmuseet/Museum Sydøstanmark)
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Archaeologists suggest that a small silver artifact found at Borgring Viking fortress near Køge in eastern Denmark may be missing from an elaborate box brooch found in a woman’s grave at Fyrkat fortress in Hobro, over 100 miles away. 

archaeology.org/news/6026-171017-denmark-silver-box

(Nationalmuseet/Museum Sydøstanmark)

Eileen Nelsen Cannon, Konstantinas Kostas and 23 others like this

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Jim BobinskyWow,Show it again when they match up.

4 days ago   ·  2
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Celia MayersWhat a marvellous stroke of fortune !!

3 days ago   ·  1
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Diane Belairmight be my great-grandmothers lol

4 days ago
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David AllisonSo reunite them...

4 days ago
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Paul BoothSo she stole it theif

3 days ago
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John Gershanoffits mine...I lost it

5 hours ago
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Ronald ShivelyWOW . . . .

4 days ago
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Dorthe Horn ChristensenNanna

4 days ago   ·  1
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Dick PitchforkDave Johnson

4 days ago   ·  1
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

3 days ago
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Colin Macdonald Marilyn GrantAnna Lise

4 days ago
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Archaeology Magazine updated their profile picture.

The Rosetta Stone, discovered at Rashid, Egypt, 1799, is featured on the cover of our November/December 2017 issue: archaeology.org/issues

Explore more! Subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

Photo: © Trustees of the British Museum
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The Rosetta Stone, discovered at Rashid, Egypt, 1799, is featured on the cover of our November/December 2017 issue: archaeology.org/issues

Explore more! Subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

Photo:  © Trustees of the British Museum

Vassiliki Deligiannidou, Roger J. Retzlaff Jr. and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Barb AucoinSteve Liberace One of the few times in my life I was so dumbstruck that I could barely breathe was when I saw the Rosetta Stone at the British Museum. I felt so very honored to see it.

4 days ago   ·  11

1 Reply

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Steve LiberaceVery exciting! An incredible archaeological find. One of the great discoveries of the last 2,000 years, for sure!

4 days ago   ·  3
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John ConniffThought I was renewe my subscription an wound up subscripting to world Archaeology

4 days ago
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Elaine BehrendtOne of the BEST magazines of the year!! Read it all at once!!

4 days ago   ·  1
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Manuel Alejandro Naranjo HernandezEL MENSAJE ORIGINAL JAMAS SERA REVELADO PUES ERA UNA ADVERTENCIA DEL CICLO DE RENOVACION DE LA TIERRA

4 days ago
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At the Mummies Ballbeautiful cover

3 hours ago
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#ICYMI A Dutch scholar of the ancient language known as Luwian has translated a 3,200-year-old inscription discovered in the late 19th century on a 95-foot stretch of stone at an archaeological site in Beyköy, a town located near Turkey’s Black Sea coast.

archaeology.org/n…/5975-171010-luwian-inscription-translated

(Courtesy Luwian Studies)
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#ICYMI A Dutch scholar of the ancient language known as Luwian has translated a 3,200-year-old inscription discovered in the late 19th century on a 95-foot stretch of stone at an archaeological site in Beyköy, a town located near Turkey’s Black Sea coast.

archaeology.org/n…/5975-171010-luwian-inscription-translated

(Courtesy Luwian Studies)

Konstantinas Kostas, Chelsea Shields-Más and 23 others like this

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Ales AtreidesLooks like directions for building something from Ikea.

4 days ago   ·  6
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Sunni ClarkWhy list a link if it doesn't function?

4 days ago   ·  2
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Celia RothbachI would like to know, what is said in this translation. Thank you in advance!

4 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Heather DoebereinerThe link isn't working.

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Ozgur Poyraz AkdoganDemek istediği türkiye de Karadeniz Çorumda lidyalilar yaşamış çok antik eşya altın para muchefer çıktı çok da var türkiye çorum

4 days ago
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Heather BiasIs there a working link ?

4 days ago
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Michele CaseyPlease provide a better link, I would love to read what it said.

4 days ago
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Mark CelentanoGregory Siff i had to show you this brother. surely the Artist spirit is ancient. #AncientSpirits

4 days ago
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Brian Scott WardThe requested page can't be found.

4 days ago
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Terrance CampbellIf you think instructions in Chinese is bad try these

3 days ago
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Ninha Ana MariaSe não tem a tradução ou pelo menos um breve resumo....de que adianta mostrar?

4 days ago
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Gürol BıçakçıBeyköy is in Afyonkarahsar province, located at Mediterranean region (southern part), not Black Sea region.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Jeff KitchenOld IKEA instructions 🤔🤔🤔🤔

4 days ago
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Cathy WaterburyError 404

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Gayle VirginJohn de Bry new things popping up

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Luann DarrowBroken link

4 days ago
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Ron Chatointeresting

4 days ago
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Rosa Mari Castro HernandezI looked and it worked

4 days ago
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Christine RobertsWhat did it say???

4 days ago
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Dean SmithCan we read the translation?

4 days ago
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Nasir Hasan KhanzadaWhat does it say?!!

4 days ago
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Nataly Limanice

3 days ago
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A gilt-bronze statue depicting a Buddha triad or two Hyupsi bodhisattvas, thought to date to the sixth century A.D., has been recovered at Jinjeon Temple in South Korea.

archaeology.org/news/5990-171016-gilt-bronze-triad

(Cultural Heritage Administration of the Republic of Korea)
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A gilt-bronze statue depicting a Buddha triad or two Hyupsi bodhisattvas, thought to date to the sixth century A.D., has been recovered at Jinjeon Temple in South Korea.

archaeology.org/news/5990-171016-gilt-bronze-triad

(Cultural Heritage Administration of the Republic of Korea)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Eduțu Eduțu and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Gail NoonTo the editors, staff, journalists of Archaeology magazine, and to aechaeology buffs.....WHY are you always AMAZED at any new discovery(ies) of human advanced intelligence - from thousands of years prior to widely accepted (assumed) ages of human accomplishments ? Consider this - "Adah gave birth to Jabal; he was the father of those who dwell in tents and have livestock. His brother's name was Jubal; he was the father of all those who play the lyre and pipe. As for Zillah, also gave birth to Tubal-cain, the forger of all implements of bronze and iron........." These sentences (Genesis chapter 4) reveal that mankind was ALREADY just as highly intelligent as contempoary mankind is.......BEFORE the Noahic Flood happened. You secularists LOVE to constantly claim "Bible-thumpers" are "stupid, ignorant fools" - yet the new, advanced tech equipment keeps showing scientists that YOU are the "ignorant fools".......simply because you deliberately CHOOSE to refuse to believe God exists, and CHOOSE to reject the contents of the Bible.

4 days ago
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Matt WyckoffBodhisattva! would you take me by the hand Bodhisattva! would you take me by the hand Can you show me the shine of your Japan The sparkle of your china, can you show me!

5 days ago
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Annette DelgatoI see FOUR figures. Looks like Buddha's sitting on someone's shoulders, or someone's on his shoulders

5 days ago

1 Reply

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John SevickRobin Scanlon ...

4 days ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

5 days ago   ·  1
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Nathan BoisvertErnest Lissabet

5 days ago   ·  1
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Michael AshmoreChristine Dieck Ho Den Sunim

4 days ago
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A temple dedicated to Ramses II has been uncovered in the Abusir necropolis in Egypt by a team of Egyptian and Czech archaeologists.

archaeology.org/news/5989-171016-abusir-ramses-temple

(Courtesy the Czech Institute of Egyptology)
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A temple dedicated to Ramses II has been uncovered in the Abusir necropolis in Egypt by a team of Egyptian and Czech archaeologists. 

archaeology.org/news/5989-171016-abusir-ramses-temple

(Courtesy the Czech Institute of Egyptology)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Ross Flowers and 23 others like this

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Leonila Navarro San AgustinWish i was an archeologist! I love history!

5 days ago   ·  10

4 Replies

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Ramsés GüneşKeep searching. I had much more temples. For Gods sake!✋✋✋ 😁😂

4 days ago
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Robert SchleicherJasmine Gleis, see how Ramses is spelt.

4 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Yan BouchardCartouche.....révélateur

5 days ago
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Glen Oldhamwow

4 days ago
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Lisa WaygoodJay Ward

4 days ago   ·  1
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Nevare ZimmermanBelinda Zimmerman 😯

5 days ago

1 Reply

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Georgina WilliamPaula Sliwo

5 days ago
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Archaeologists in Jerusalem have exposed eight courses of stone wall in the Western Wall Tunnels, some 26 feet below the surface of the Old City, uncovering a potential theater dating to the Late Roman period, along with pottery and coins.

archaeology.org/news/5988-171016-jerusalem-stone-courses

(Yaniv Berman, Courtesy Israel Antiquities Authority)
... See MoreSee Less

Archaeologists in Jerusalem have exposed eight courses of stone wall in the Western Wall Tunnels, some 26 feet below the surface of the Old City, uncovering a potential theater dating to the Late Roman period, along with pottery and coins. 

archaeology.org/news/5988-171016-jerusalem-stone-courses

(Yaniv Berman, Courtesy Israel Antiquities Authority)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Lucille MacBernik and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Terry ArndtI have been under the Temple Mount to see the excavations and I am still amazed at how precise the very large stones were cut. It’s as if a laser made the cuts with sophisticated modern equipment. How they did it 3000 or so years ago does not compute for me...tried to slip a credit card 💳 into a joint... no go

5 days ago   ·  11
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Brian Bolligbeveled stones like the ones shown in the photo indicate the section of the wall from the second temple period. you also see them at David's Tower.

5 days ago   ·  7

1 Reply

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Jimmy SellersAmazing, all of the digs that have been conducted in Jerusalem and still new discoveries being made!

5 days ago
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Anastasia TzintzisAnyway ,this theatre must be from the Greek Hellenistic period as the Romans were interested in fights in a colosseum not theatre and the Jews were not civilized enough to have one in the past.... archaeology.org/news/5988-171016-jerusalem-stone-courses

4 days ago
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Virginia StaffaIt’s amazing that they keep finding these archeology wonders! Love reading up on the new finds!!

5 days ago   ·  2
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Christopher SizemoreThe Late Roman period means Palestine not Judea.

5 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Anastasia TzintzisWhat does a Roman theatre , Roman coins ....found the wall of the second temple? Found?

5 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Carol BuckinghamToo small to be a theater. Perhaps rhetorical podium

4 days ago
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Sharkey SmithGod Bless Isreal.....

5 days ago   ·  3

11 Replies

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Ivaylo GrancharovExtraordinary!!!

5 days ago   ·  1
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Andy Thomaswow

5 days ago   ·  1
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David JonesCool

4 days ago
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Ramsés GüneşMmmmmmm

3 days ago
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Ruben MontoyaKristian Brink Manuel Lagos Julia M. Smith

4 days ago   ·  1
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Aparna MittalLeah Verghese

4 days ago
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Ree BrownDoug Brown

5 days ago
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In this issue’s World Roundup: A rare green glass spearhead shaped by an Aboriginal prisoner was found on Australia’s Rottnest Island.

archaeology.org/issues/270-1709/world

(Courtesy the University of Western Australia)
... See MoreSee Less

In this issue’s World Roundup: A rare green glass spearhead shaped by an Aboriginal prisoner was found on Australia’s Rottnest Island.

archaeology.org/issues/270-1709/world

(Courtesy the University of Western Australia)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Barbara Morement and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Barry MooreThat particular site is an exposed sand cliff with 20 feet of layers. At the bottom I found the most beautiful quartz spearpoint I’ve ever seen, perfectly symmetrical chipping and at the top level, just above the Top of the World chert, was the projectile point made from a dark blue bottle

5 days ago   ·  14
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Lance Branfordis it effective against night walkers?

5 days ago   ·  14

5 Replies

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Traci YoungMichael Young let’s go to Australia and find some of these!!! Spearheads made from aboriginal prisoners from 1800’s to 1930’s....

5 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Nicholas Stewartthey are quite common i have seen many in my life working on sights the sad thing is people where generaly shot at there quarry sites so they had to resort to improvising with stuff from rubbish sites quartz or silcrete where much more hardy

4 days ago
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Hank DuchnowskiA company called Lex Corp had already purchased this.

5 days ago   ·  7
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Barry MooreFound one of these made from blue glass

5 days ago   ·  3
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Fraser AndrewsNicole Davie Rottnest island! You should’ve been the one to find this..

5 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Armenius Von SteinbachKryptonite! So they already dealt with the first kryptonians 😂😅

5 days ago   ·  3
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Stuart Christopher HarperMy uncle bob made that when he visited australia last year.

5 days ago
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Ed DouglasRich Scott nice bet he was someone special who carried that

5 days ago   ·  2

3 Replies

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Fausto Echevarriawas done to kill Superman..

4 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Laura MorabitoMatteo Gaia il famoso Peroniano di aspetto Heinekeniano!!!!

5 days ago   ·  2

3 Replies

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Phillip EnosThat is made from a green glass bottle

5 days ago   ·  2
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John PondFine work shows great and understanding of the material

5 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Hamo McLernonMade from a VB long neck

5 days ago
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Gavin CornellI hate when I snap the tip off my arrow heads.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Frank HasenmuellerI never knew the Aborigines hated Superman so much.

4 days ago
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Ca BillNice. Does anyone know how to reproduce them?

5 days ago
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Alan LearnedGorgeous. Oh to be killed by such a weapon...

5 days ago
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Cesar Mendoza Cuelloexcelente en mexico mty n.l ehh encontrado de vidrio puede ser color blanco transparente.... hermoso pedernal....

5 days ago
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Marie WalliAbzidione? ? Maybe? Not quite sure how it's spelled! I think Aztec and Incaalso use green stone.

5 days ago

1 Reply

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Prado JenKryptonite! There's a name for that it really comes from space 🚀 but I can't think of the term

4 days ago
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Edgar EnríquezEsa fue la lanza que le clavó Batman a Súperman pues, la de kriptonita 😮

4 days ago
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Terran SteinbergToo bad it wasn't found in his captor's heart, but very impressive.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Frank RobbinsThis is way cool!! I wish I had found it.

4 days ago
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The Uffington White Horse, the only prehistoric geoglyph known in Europe, was originally created as a depiction of a “solar horse,” a new theory suggests.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5830-trenches-england-prehistoric-uffington-white-horse

(Skyscan Photolibrary / Alamy)
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The Uffington White Horse, the only prehistoric geoglyph known in Europe, was originally created as a depiction of a “solar horse,” a new theory suggests.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5830-trenches-england-prehistoric-uffington-white-horse

(Skyscan Photolibrary / Alamy)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Hannah Perkins and 23 others like this

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Christine AspinallOur ancestors were much wiser than that for which they are given credit. Proof of that is the fact that we humans are still here (although for how long is a moot point given what 'we' are doing to our environment).

5 days ago   ·  6
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Luis BlanchardStrange......I painted a wall in a danish school some years ago.....I made a horse,in some way similar to this, and the three suns....rising, noon, and sunset. I told the pupils, about the importance of the horse along the early times....I didn't know about this figure...Coincidence?

5 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

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Shnan LoressYou can really see in the picture how it accentuates the natural shape of the rocks that looks like a horse to begin with! It's an embellishment

5 days ago   ·  2

3 Replies

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Vincent AlbertI remember being on tour and going from the end of france towards britain, near the hills i spotted a white horse outline before i got on the ferry. It was smaller than this. What was interesting is i was casually listening to "keliohesten" by burzum, meaning the white horse.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Emily HoranMadeline Tolkien was from near here. Almost unicorn and Rohan are supposedly influenced by it. LotR Trivia for your daily life.

5 days ago   ·  2
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Sindie MunroIt could be a dog symbol there protecting the village from spirits. "The dog was the first animal to be domesticated, and the difficult experience of taming it began when a certain dog, after following a hunter around all day, actually went home with him. For ages dogs were used for food, hunting, transportation, and companionship. At first dogs only howled, but later on they learned to bark. The dog's keen sense of smell led to the notion it could see spirits, and thus arose the dog-fetish cults. The employment of watchdogs made it first possible for the whole clan to sleep at night. It then became the custom to employ watchdogs to protect the home against spirits as well as material enemies. When the dog barked, man or beast approached, but when the dog howled, spirits were near. Even now many still believe that a dog's howling at night betokens death." UB

4 days ago
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Antoine ChabrolThe good thing with all the "solar theories" or astrological things of prehistoric remains : it really has no scientific basis but it's really clickbait...

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Scott GreusaichFunny I read an article that said they now thought it was not a horse at all, wish they would make their minds up 😆

5 days ago
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Matt CooteIt's very similar to Celtic and Etruscan stylised sculptural depictions of horses too 🤔

5 days ago
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Muri ErenWhat about the ides that it could be a celestial zodiac? Taurus, for example. It even has horns on its head.

4 days ago
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Jane GleghornStill think it’s a dog...

5 days ago   ·  1
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Sheryl SkoglundSolar would be a horse of the sun. Orions horse is gold and white. Nahar was a Orome horse in The Silmarillion. White horse with gold shoes or hoofs. Orion has a horse nebula in the constellation.

4 days ago
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John PhillipsIt's not what a horse is, it's what a horse be.

5 days ago   ·  6

2 Replies

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Maria Kaehne Hvid AndersenStephen Knowles I wrote this theory in my A-level archaeology course 4 years ago, and was told off 😂😂

5 days ago

1 Reply

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Ivaylo Grancharovif you follow the direction the horse is headed to, you will reach Stonehenge.

5 days ago   ·  2
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Billy HucksIt's puzzling how they knew the terrain resembled a horse without seeing from above.

5 days ago   ·  2

5 Replies

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Dawn Birdsong Vadbunker OlmstedAssume people different from the dominant culture did this, since there are no others.

5 days ago
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Chuck MikellThis is the earliest known "rocky horse."

5 days ago   ·  1
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Elle CampbellAmazing that it is such a "modern" design yet it is centuries old!

5 days ago   ·  1
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Jessica PinterOOOOR it was sooo long ago no one has a FKN idea.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Deirdre BonnycastleAll I can see is how much closer it is to falling into the sea.

5 days ago
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James RogersWhat is amazing is that it managed to survive.

5 days ago
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Arlette BergaminiAnother repost, again several weeks ago. Why can't new info be posted

5 days ago
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Robert ClawsonSuper beautiful; our ancestors beautified the landscape - we now do so much to destroy it.

5 days ago
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John ShireThe only one? What about the bloke with the big willie!?

5 days ago

1 Reply

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Sections of a large circular temple dedicated to the Aztec god of wind and part of a ritual ball court have been uncovered in downtown Mexico City.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5818-trenches-mexico-city-aztec-temple

(Courtesy Héctor Montaño/INAH)
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Sections of a large circular temple dedicated to the Aztec god of wind and part of a ritual ball court have been uncovered in downtown Mexico City.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5818-trenches-mexico-city-aztec-temple

(Courtesy Héctor Montaño/INAH)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Jeanette Kulick and 23 others like this

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Anne Woodward BettencourtThis is wonderful news Nancy. Good diversion from the fire. I spent all day returning my things to where I had them. I had to take in less than half an hour what I could. Thank goodness Cissy came with her SUV to help me.The first thing gathered were my two cat crates,food,beds and 40 lbs bags of pine pellets I use for litter. We went to Cissy’s house and returned late Monday. Just think if you had to be out of your house in 20 so minutes what besides your cats would you take? I had done this over a year ago. Go around your house and video tape each room. Open doors and cabinets too. If you have any out buildings get them too and of course your car. My heart is sadden with all the people that perished in the fire and lost their homes. This is all so unbelievable. I’ll have to read more about the Aztec lost temple. I love archaeology in any form. All my love to you. 😘

6 days ago
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Donald James-WilsonIf the stones could only speak. In fact, maybe they do.

6 days ago   ·  1
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Mary EdgecombThe stones are actually skulls.

6 days ago   ·  1
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Lamar PassmoreIdolatry is haram, Moses said don't worship any graven images, statues, monuments, etc...

5 days ago

1 Reply

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Arlette BergaminiA repost from weeks ago

5 days ago
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Jennifer HernandezDorian Miller 😍

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

6 days ago   ·  1
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Bigdail GastelumEverett Rowlett Jr.

6 days ago
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The ancient Peruvian site of Pañamarca, which features extraordinarily imaginative murals by the Moche culture, has been reinvestigated by archaeologists.

archaeology.org/issues/268-1709/features/5815-peru-panamarca-moche

(Courtesy Lisa Trever)
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The ancient Peruvian site of Pañamarca, which features extraordinarily imaginative murals by the Moche culture, has been reinvestigated by archaeologists. 

archaeology.org/issues/268-1709/features/5815-peru-panamarca-moche

(Courtesy Lisa Trever)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, At the Mummies Ball and 23 others like this

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Laura DeBaun StevensYour mom showed me the magazine Lisa. Awesome Lisa. Tried to find the magazine today with no luck. Hope you are having fun with your family. I know your mom is.

6 days ago
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Helen ChappellThose Moche were a barrel of laughs with their blood sacrifices and dancing skeletons. . .

6 days ago
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Paul BoothI'd like see his feet and the rest of the picture fully dug out

6 days ago
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Paul BoothIs that a laser gun in his hand

6 days ago

1 Reply

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Jj BellSuch an important culture, which connects old world and new in very ancient times.

6 days ago
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David O'Connellthat is incredible !

6 days ago
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Adriane BloyerLooks like Mr. Magoo feeding birds LOL

5 days ago
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Elizabeth Waugh ParsonsI want to go back!!!!❤️

6 days ago
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Maria Pilar ConnVery interesting.

5 days ago
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Wendy Demi-LuneBenoit

6 days ago
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Rolando Flores VegaDaniela La Chioma

6 days ago   ·  1
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Phoebe YatesKatherine Collins

6 days ago   ·  1
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Ana Luna SanguineSeán J Tascone

6 days ago

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Although humans domesticated jungle fowl in Asia around 6,000 years ago, new research finds that modern chickens have developed some of their most prized domestic traits only in the last 1,000 years.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5820-trenches-europe-chicken-domestication

(Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez, Wikimedia Commons)
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Although humans domesticated jungle fowl in Asia around 6,000 years ago, new research finds that modern chickens have developed some of their most prized domestic traits only in the last 1,000 years.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5820-trenches-europe-chicken-domestication

(Luis Miguel Bugallo Sánchez, Wikimedia Commons)

Annette Evenson, กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ and 23 others like this

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Kassi BakerThat last statement was crap. Genetic Modification involves splicing genes of unrelated genus's (tomato and salmon for pinker meat and so on). What is described here is selective breeding through human means, just like with dogs. That statement is inaccurate.

7 days ago   ·  6

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Edward SawyerA chicken is nothing more then a gouse and there still around. As for this asia thing no one really knows when humans first caught gouse. They found bones around the world. The jungle fowl is just one of many, this breed still can be found in jungles. As they say about dogs being domestic, dogs have different breeds and so do chickens. Also they don't know when dogs or wolves came to live with humans. Cave people were the first ones to use selective breeding on dogs who's to say they didn't do the same to other animals.

6 days ago   ·  1
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Judy Tullis'Friendliness' is one of those prized domestic traits. I dunno. Can't recall meeting any really friendly chickens.

7 days ago

2 Replies

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Brian Austin OsgoodChickens are an awesome Stoner pet. Goats and rabbits are runners-up.

7 days ago   ·  2
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Seamus RidgellThey developed spicy wings far more recently

7 days ago   ·  2
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Russell AdamsThey were vicious beasts that stood 3' to 4' in height.

7 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Venkat VenkatWORLD FIRST CULTURE IS TAMIL CULTURE RESEARCH bor

6 days ago   ·  1
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Ell MausPoor animals hey suffer too much

6 days ago

3 Replies

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Andrew ColglazierYou eat those that don't lay, or that peck. Soon, peckless layers. Voile'!

6 days ago
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Ivaylo GrancharovSo either the Romans had no poached eggs for breakfast, or the history is shorter than we think. 🙂

7 days ago
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Yvonne Thompsonlol another entry in the "captain obvious strikes again" folio

7 days ago
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Roger F. Sherman IIPrehistoric rapter, but with feathers!

6 days ago
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William HarrisonThe Real velociraptors!

7 days ago

3 Replies

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Marjorie V. Eddy EnglishI really like this magazine

6 days ago
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Jane SmartLesley Orr 🐓

6 days ago
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Tonya TaylorChris Lynne

7 days ago
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Annette EvensonBrandy Steffes🐣

1 hour ago
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Fabien BelhaouesKévin Bouchité

5 days ago

1 Reply

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Christine KalmeyShelly Garow

7 days ago
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Sofia CarosiStuart Perkins

7 days ago
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Janeen Calinda BradshawSondra McDonald-Beaulac

7 days ago   ·  1
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It has been an active fire season across the American West, but archaeological evidence suggests destructive fires were less common in the ancient past.

archaeology.org/issues/272-1709/letter-from/5826-letter-from-california-fires

(Justin Sullivan / Gettyimages)
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It has been an active fire season across the American West, but archaeological evidence suggests destructive fires were less common in the ancient past. 

archaeology.org/issues/272-1709/letter-from/5826-letter-from-california-fires

(Justin Sullivan / Gettyimages)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Prish Schofield and 23 others like this

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Jacky GarbuttBecause they occurred more frequently, and thus the fire load didn't have the same chance to buildup to catastrophic levels.

7 days ago   ·  21

3 Replies

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Donna Lorraine Nittinger Clarksome may also be due, in calif,to our ecology, fire based. before development, seasonal fires used to be hot and quick, but with development, fire prone material builds up, which changes the nature of the fires.

7 days ago   ·  11
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Gary GaddDeveloping the wilderness. Electrical transmission shorts, rubbish fires, campfires, tossed out cigarette, arson. As people intrusion into previously wilderness settings increases, so will the likelihood of someone creating a fire disaster.

7 days ago   ·  4

1 Reply

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Dan PlattControlled burns and intensive habitat management in a continent with very few truly domesticable species was common. Early European colonials in what would become the northeast US described park-like woods that had been heavily managed to promote wildlife populations. In a way, for the actual question in the headlines, all this is a confounder: what would be a more interesting baseline is what conflagration frequencies would look like without human intervention - ANY human intervention.

7 days ago   ·  1
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Shnan LoressIndigenous people made controlled burns on the reg so the forest floors stayed clear of deadfall and grassland area didn't get choked up with encroaching bush. This is well known in anthropological circles: humans have a role in the ecosystem, we are part of the web

7 days ago   ·  1
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Pamela ReischGreat read ! Shows how the natives took much better care of their land than we do. It's wonderful to see the native Americans taking care of their valley again. But, I remember reading something about how Europeans brought earthworms with them and the worms changed the forest floors. Could have been this magazine, Smithsonian or National Geographic cause that's about all I read.

6 days ago
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Amichai Ben LeahFires may have been less common in ancient times, due primarily to the shorter interval between naturally occurring fires of shorter duration and intensity.

7 days ago   ·  2
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William HawkinsThey would have been less destructive because the Greens were not around telling us not to winter burn the fuel on the ground. Also a lot of the houses were made properly.

7 days ago   ·  1
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Ashley Elizabeth"Because there weren't as many people to make fires". For crying out loud.. most wildfires are caused by lightning.

7 days ago   ·  2

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Steve Figgins MarionLess ways to make fire and less people to start them .... Common sense.

7 days ago   ·  6
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Seamus RidgellLess people fewer interrupted environments.

7 days ago   ·  2
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Mary Wittthe more we build the more will burn

7 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Pietro SommavillaIn the ancient past people didn't know about hydraulic fracking...

7 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Elizabeth Jean SullivanThey weren't needed as often before people came along and got in the way of nature's progress.

7 days ago
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Jessica Pinter....archeological evedence sugest less people had less stuff to be destroyed.

6 days ago
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Barbara McCumberFewer people starting them.

6 days ago
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Randy HendricksonThis headline doesn't seem grammatically correct.

7 days ago
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Jeffery WilliamsThere were fewer people in the ancient past to start fire's .

7 days ago
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Shari VansyckelThey burned "naturally" Kept fuel down

7 days ago
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Bob GibbonsLess reporting as well

7 days ago   ·  1
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Mike TitusLightning every year!

7 days ago
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Danny HeathLESS PEOPLE

6 days ago
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Venkat VenkatWhat about you??😢

6 days ago
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Barbara FaccioniPeanuts

7 days ago
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Deposits of coal in an underwater Mexican cave known as the Ancestors Chamber appear to have been connected to bonfires, suggesting the cave was occupied around 10,500 years ago, at the end of the Ice Age when it was still dry.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5824-trenches-mexico-cenote-coal

(Courtesy Krzysztof Starnawski)
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Deposits of coal in an underwater Mexican cave known as the Ancestors Chamber appear to have been connected to bonfires, suggesting the cave was occupied around 10,500 years ago, at the end of the Ice Age when it was still dry.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5824-trenches-mexico-cenote-coal

(Courtesy Krzysztof Starnawski)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Jacob Thielen VII and 23 others like this

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Joe BarberBurning caused global warming and ended that ice age..

6 days ago
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John D. PerryCharcoal from wood you mean, or do you mean coal?

1 week ago   ·  2
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Mary EdgecombLest you forget human remains have been found in the caves as well.

1 week ago   ·  3
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Ava WilsonI love my Archaeology Magazine!

6 days ago   ·  1
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Christopher Edward CampbellThe people who explore these cenotes have no fear.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Diana Oppeluse to be dry land now under water ..wow

1 week ago   ·  1
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Rob WaldWhat a find !! Well done

7 days ago   ·  1
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Maryanne CarrollProbably pre flood

1 week ago
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Saydi Parisawesome

1 week ago
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ßrian BarnettKevin Kave

1 week ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

1 week ago
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A mitochondrial DNA study from remains of 19 members of Newfoundland’s Beothuk culture, which died out in the early nineteenth century, suggests they were not closely related to Maritime Archaic people as previously understood, and may reveal whether any First Nations groups include descendants of those Beothuk thought to have escaped Newfoundland upon European arrival.

archaeology.org/news/5986-171013-canada-beothuk-dna

(William Gosse, via Wikimedia Commons)
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A mitochondrial DNA study from remains of 19 members of Newfoundland’s Beothuk culture, which died out in the early nineteenth century, suggests they were not closely related to Maritime Archaic people as previously understood, and may reveal whether any First Nations groups include descendants of those Beothuk thought to have escaped Newfoundland upon European arrival. 

archaeology.org/news/5986-171013-canada-beothuk-dna

(William Gosse, via Wikimedia Commons)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, 陈美艾 and 23 others like this

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Dennis KG RobinsonAs I recall from Canadian History, the Beothuks were exterminated rather than "died out". . Skeleton in our closet, I'm afraid. . 😒😒😒

1 week ago   ·  24

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Anna Michelle ThiviergeI think that painting is one of the ones that survived/escaped. Her name was Shawn a something. I believe a Brit started interviewing her about her culture and the Beothuk language so that it wouldn’t be entirely lost, even though there was a strong language barrier. She died from contracting tuberculous or pneumonia. The Beothuk story was in my grade 6 or 7 social textbook (in Alberta Ed).

1 week ago   ·  12

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Ashton D. Barella-LeeI love the genetic studies. My mtdna is an oddity and has been studied by a geneticist in Italy and Ian Logan of genbank. Tracing back as far as I can get, Middle Ages, my Maternal line is Tuscan. I am basal J2a1* which originated in Europe in the Paleolithic. Only two other basal Haplotypes have showed up so far, a modern Irishman and the Archaeological DNA of a man from what's now Hungary. Of the three my Haplotype is the oldest . Basal with a few private mutations

7 days ago   ·  2
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Elizabeth StuartFor those of you who are interested this is the scientific paper. www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(17)31091-6

1 week ago   ·  6
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Greg GrimshawBeothuk are the real red skins. They painted themselves with ocher

1 week ago   ·  1
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Angela ThomasThe words "died out" need to be replaced with the factual words "were killed off."

1 week ago   ·  4

9 Replies

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Sarah KellumIt would be wonderful if there was a link so they are no longer totally gone.

7 days ago   ·  1
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Richard KosackCheck Viking DNA

1 week ago   ·  6
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Kelly Tudor"Died out" = Genocide

1 week ago   ·  4
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Rebecca LennonLooks like Paul McCartney.

7 days ago
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Mary Pat AllenPaul McCartney?

1 week ago
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Jason AinslieJennifer Woodruff this is up your alley

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Fatimmæ VeTowersÉmile Duchesne

1 week ago   ·  1
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A new genetic study casts doubt on the idea that the Polynesians who populated Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, had contact with Native South Americans before the arrival of Europeans in the eighteenth century.

archaeology.org/news/5985-171013-easter-island-genes

(Terry Hunt, UC Santa Cruz)
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A new genetic study casts doubt on the idea that the Polynesians who populated Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island, had contact with Native South Americans before the arrival of Europeans in the eighteenth century. 

archaeology.org/news/5985-171013-easter-island-genes

(Terry Hunt, UC Santa Cruz)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Bob Lazar and 23 others like this

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Damien SmithThe trade winds and currents in that area usually flow northwest, which makes sailing from Easter Island to South America difficult.

1 week ago   ·  6

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Paul CarrollMy wife is certain that the Incas made it to Easter Island (she's Peruvian). I think she uses the fine workmanship with some rock platforms as being similar to Incan sites as the rationale. I suppose I should be agnostic. But I don't think there was enough of a sea-going tradition for that.

1 week ago   ·  3

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Dermot O'BrienJust out of curiosity, do those stone figures all face the same direction? And if so is that towards South America? Just wondering if they might have been meant to scare off possible raiding parties from South America?

1 week ago   ·  4

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Justin MaupinThats kind of a duh, this isnt new knowledge, their is proof that the egyptians had contact with the southern native americans as well. As an instance, with pharaohs having traces of cocaine in their systems, based upon scientific samples taken and tested and then knowing the cocoa plant isnt a native plant to africa.

1 week ago
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William JohnstonIn the book Ra by Thor Heyerdahl, the statues were discussed with some of the natives. I don't remember all of the details, but they knew where they were made and how to move the statues. Heyerdahl sailed from South America to the Easter Islands.

1 week ago
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Craig KoebelinSomehow, sweet potatoes came to Polynesia around 1000 AD from South America. They were either brought there, or rafted there.

1 week ago   ·  4
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P-O SjöbergWell, I do respect the genetics findings excluding any indian genes on the living population, but I am pussled with the cultural similarities from pre-Incan Peru and volcanic cave artifacts in Te-pito-te-henua. The Long-Ears of Peru do have cultural similarities with the Ororoinas, occurances that is much weaker Eastwards in Polynesia, maybe with exception of Marquesas. The rongo-rongos is Polynesias single extremely pinpointed local writing language, but would be Pre Columbian Americas third (or fourth). Naturally: Mankind is capable of the same magnificensy regardless of location as long as there is relief from the basic forraging. But my curiosity is stirred due to the broad spectra of indications.

7 days ago   ·  1
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Nasili Vaka'utaI'm Polynesian. Our ancestors did not sail with the current; they sailed against the current to make sure they could return home with the current if they got lost

1 week ago   ·  3
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Sandra SampleAll the ancient archaeology and carvings never cease to amaze me. However, the buildings, roads, ships that are built today also amaze me.

6 days ago
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Anna ThomfordLooks like Thor Heyerdahl was wrong about that, but he did prove that very primitive craft could sail the ocean, or at least, drift. It's becoming clear that we all have an urge to wander. People get around.

1 week ago
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Sonia HomrichDepending in how you look at History. Try to connect with Rudolf Steiner's lectures and you will be very pleased.

1 week ago
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Jacques LandreauIt's that pesky sweet potato thing...it just won't go away!

1 week ago   ·  1
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Nikolajs KošeļevsHow did people even get there in the first place?!

1 week ago

2 Replies

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Patrick BatesIt was never more than wishful thinking by wanna-feel-good-and-inclusive anthropologists...... .

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Glen ShortAll this proves is that there was no intermingling of the two bloodlines in the samples studied. And there is this sentence in the original report: "However, by use of contemporary Rapanui samples, Moreno-Mayar et al. [6] estimated the Native American admixture event at ∼22 generations ago, which translates to 1310–1420 CE if assuming a generation time of 25–30 years [32]. " This date correlates with the supposed visit by the Inca leader Tupac Yupanqui, a voyage to the west mentioned in three separate Spanish chronicles. Peruvian historian Jose Antonio del Bustos wrote a scholarly book defending the legend, unfortunately not yet available in English. His theory was they landed first at Mangareva in French Polynesia, and returned via Easter Island. The chronicles say they returned with "dark skinned" people. In this tv interview he outlines a lot of ancilliary evidence, unfortunately it's all in Spanish m.youtube.com/watch?v=TWIV4bNjVLM

1 week ago   ·  1
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Brandon HillTerry Knight

6 days ago
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Cynthia WoodEaster island

1 week ago
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#OTD in A.D. 54, Nero succeeded Claudius as Roman Emperor. Of the many scandals to accompany his reign, perhaps none angered his constituents more than the construction of his Domus Aurea, or “Golden House,” a lavish imperial residence born from the ashes of the devastating A.D. 64 Fire of Rome, and proof for many Romans that Nero set the blaze himself.

archaeology.org/issues/187-1509/features/3562-golden-house-of-an-emperor

( Henryk Siemiradzki, via Wikimedia Commons)
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#OTD in A.D. 54, Nero succeeded Claudius as Roman Emperor. Of the many scandals to accompany his reign, perhaps none angered his constituents more than the construction of his Domus Aurea, or “Golden House,” a lavish imperial residence born from the ashes of the devastating A.D. 64 Fire of Rome, and proof for many Romans that Nero set the blaze himself. 

archaeology.org/issues/187-1509/features/3562-golden-house-of-an-emperor

( Henryk Siemiradzki, via Wikimedia Commons)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Charlotte Åberg and 23 others like this

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Martin BacardiWhat is this nonsense that I'm reading about Nero here? You fail to mention many things... such as that Nero was a peace loving artistic Emperor who closed the gates of the temple of Janus in 66 CE or that he brought many Greek cultural concepts into Rome which the common people loved, but were much to the disgust of the established Roman aristocracy and military. Nero's public building works included the Gymnasium Neronis, an amphitheater, a meat market, and a proposed canal that would connect Naples to Rome’s seaport at Ostia so as to bypass the unpredictable sea currents and ensure safe passage of the city’s food supply. Such undertakings cost money, which Roman emperors typically procured by raiding other countries. But Nero’s warless reign foreclosed this option. Instead he elected to soak the rich with property taxes, and in the case of his great shipping canal, to seize their land altogether. Let's look at the "great" emperor Constantine for a moment. He was responsible for countless executions and had his first son, his second wife, and his father-in-law murdered, but he is to this day considered a Saint in many Christian churches and is generally seen in a more positive light than Nero. Why is that? I could go on and on comparing Nero to other Roman Emperors, but all I'm saying is that he was no worse than those who came before and no worse than those who came after him. Nero’s first two biographers, Suetonius and Tacitus, had ties to the Roman aristocracy and Senate and would memorialize his reign with lavish contempt. Almost certainly, after his death, the Senate ordered the expunging of Neronian influence for political reasons. However, in reality Nero's death was followed by outpourings of public grief so widespread that one of his successors Otho, amongst other things, hastily renamed himself Otho Nero and set up statues of Nero in Rome. Later, Vitellius gave Nero an enormous funeral honouring him which included the performance of songs written by Nero. Mourners apparently long continued to bring flowers to Nero's tomb and the site was said to be haunted until, in 1099, a church was erected on top of his remains in the Piazza del Popolo. Let's keep it real here people, be fair and stop the negative propaganda about Nero 😉 (y)

1 week ago   ·  7

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Rógvi Olsenalso a tragedy conserning burning of books. According to Tacitus: “ the ancient and untainted monuments of writers of genius ” (were burnt), some christians were burned probably because the punishment for arson was burning, christians despised other religions and morals so they could have been the reason for the fire, later they demolished many pagan books and temples, but another cause could be Nero himself but Tacitus has a bias, he seemed to hate Nero, hard to say historically what caused this...

1 week ago   ·  2

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Elaine KluthAs I understand it they have found this "Golden House" near the Roman Forum and the Coliseum and have left it buried .

1 week ago   ·  4

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Stanley AntonissonSuetonius on the Christians "During his reign many abuses were severely punished and put down, and no fewer new laws were made: a limit was set to expenditures; the public banquets were confined to a distribution of food, the sale of any kind of cooked viands in the taverns was forbidden, with the exception of pulse and vegetables, whereas before every sort of dainty was exposed for sale. Punishment was inflicted on the Christians, a class of men given to a new and mischievous superstition. He put an end to the diversions of the chariot drivers, who from immunity of long standing claimed the right of ranging at large and amusing themselves by cheating and robbing the people. The pantomimic actors and their partisans were banished from the city." - Life of the Emperor Nero, chapter XVI, by Gaius Suetonius Tranquilla, (c. 69 - c. 122 AD), a Roman historian under Publius Aelius Hadrianus, (76-138 AD; Roman Emperor from 117 to 138 AD). Hadrian was the fourteenth Emperor of Rome and is known as the third of the Five Good Emperors after Marcus Cocceius Nerva (Roman Emperor: 96 - 98 AD), and Marcus Ulpius Traianus, (Roman Emperor 98-117 AD). Others were: Antoninus Pius (Roman Emperor: 138-161AD) and Marcus Aurelius (Roman Emperor: 161-180 AD) ”Nero's Torches” also called ”Candlesticks of Christianity” - painted in 1876 by Henryk Siemiradzki, (1843- 1902). Oil on canvas; dimensions: 385 × 705 cm, or 152 × 278 inches. Current location: National Museum in Krakow, Poland.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Leland ChapinMust've been an amazing palace, judging by reconstructions I've seen. That said, of course he was a tyrant and megalomaniac.

7 days ago
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Mary EdgecombAnd he was assassinated.

1 week ago   ·  2

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Murray DicksonDon't care what you say, he KNEW how to THROW A GREAT PARTY.

1 week ago
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Israel Benjamin EizykIs this a painting by sir Lawrence alma tadema???

7 days ago
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Seamus RidgellTotal as hat as my friend Jen would say

1 week ago
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Mara HolandezJoslyn Lopes maybe this will help with your test lol

1 week ago

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Taylor LeeAnd by blaming Christians, changed the course of the world.

1 week ago
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Gül CemalAdamın dibi nero

1 week ago
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Kyle KaleidescopeTayla Broekman

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Los Adaes, Louisiana, was the site of an 18th-century Spanish mission that went on to become a place of intense cultural exchange among the Spanish, the French, and the native Caddo Indians.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5829-trenches-louisiana-spanish-mission

(British Library, London, UK/Bridgeman Art Library)
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Los Adaes, Louisiana, was the site of an 18th-century Spanish mission that went on to become a place of intense cultural exchange among the Spanish, the French, and the native Caddo Indians.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5829-trenches-louisiana-spanish-mission

(British Library, London, UK/Bridgeman Art Library)

กิตติชัย ก่ออ้อ, Jacob Thielen VII and 23 others like this

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Raul V. EspinozaHow is it that Louisiana is anywhere near the South-west?? Texas also calls itself "in the south-west" It's not! it's in the south-central part of the USA. What's wrong with teaching our people geography in school?

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Reynard BrushDoes this mean the Caddo were enslaved there?

1 week ago
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Raul V. Espinoza

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Anita Sandovalgood history

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Cynthia WoodWtf

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Michelle OlivierJenna Olivier good read

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Michelle MinutoMidge, Gwen Pie

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Leon VictorCarol Ann

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Pushker Nath DharMysterious.

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360° Viewing at Giza. Christopher Dunn: Lost Technology of Ancient Egypt pt.1➡goo.gl/ouZqqX ... pt.2➡goo.gl/GyfGYk 🌎Explore our site: EarthAncients.com Selection of articles and Interviews➡earthancients.com/?s=Giza 👉Join our group: goo.gl/CCl3Ar The Great Pyramid beyond Khafre's Funerary Temple. Spin the image to the left and Khafre's monumental Pyramid towers above you Image Credit:...

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