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A Greek-style temple has been uncovered in Umm Qais, around 75 miles north of Amman, in Jordan.

archaeology.org/news/5849-170816-jordan-hellenistic-temple

(Courtesy Atef Sheyyab)
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A Greek-style temple has been uncovered in Umm Qais, around 75 miles north of Amman, in Jordan.

archaeology.org/news/5849-170816-jordan-hellenistic-temple

(Courtesy Atef Sheyyab)

Elisabeth Mizerski, R.V. Karmel and 23 others like this

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Dan TomaNot Greek, but Greek-style

12 hours ago

5 Replies

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MC BattInteresting to see the "Wheeler system" of excavating still in use. Sir Mortimer certainly left his mark all over the world!

53 minutes ago
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Kyriakos ZeibekisΗellenistic....not "greek style"....Amman hellenistic name was Philadelphia

10 hours ago   ·  1
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Anastasia TzintzisHellenistic polis with Hellenistic architecture ....Greek Macedonian

10 hours ago   ·  1
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Felippe LimaPooo awesome...epic of alexandre and generals...maybe

12 hours ago
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Mary EdgecombAlexander and company....

12 hours ago
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Tracey CianHuda 😬

11 hours ago
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Meghan Alexandra GrizzleJulie Bieri Grizzle

6 hours ago   ·  1
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

11 hours ago
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New excavations of Lord Elgin’s ship, Mentor, which sank off a Greek island in 1802, has turned up items including chess pieces, combs, and a toothbrush.

archaeology.org/news/5848-170816-greece-mentor-elgin-excavation

(Greek Ephorate of Old Antiquities)
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New excavations of Lord Elgin’s ship, Mentor, which sank off a Greek island in 1802, has turned up items including chess pieces, combs, and a toothbrush. 

archaeology.org/news/5848-170816-greece-mentor-elgin-excavation

(Greek Ephorate of Old Antiquities)

Francisco Murillo Galimany, Dave Lee and 23 others like this

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Awilda Peña BregandNo more Parthenon marbles?

14 hours ago   ·  2

8 Replies

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Zoi KoufalexiMore stolen stuff?

13 hours ago   ·  4

2 Replies

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Dermot O'BrienReturn the Parthenon Marbles to Greece.

14 hours ago   ·  13
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Joanna JonesMore stuff he stole on board?

14 hours ago   ·  7

1 Reply

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Carol Kezziah WambuiShow me the toothbrush I beg u.

14 hours ago

1 Reply

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Micah MinnocciAj, man, you're way off.

10 hours ago   ·  1
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Jan BoothHow awesome!!!!

10 hours ago
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Joseph V. ConiglioOops... the triffles that got away...

13 hours ago
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Tommy HubbardCool.

14 hours ago
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Heather JohnsonLindsey Nicole Davis

14 hours ago   ·  1
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Rosaleen RiceMarcella Logue and Niamh Hickey

12 hours ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

11 hours ago
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Sally MagnaniCarlo Magnani

13 hours ago
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Ash WhitePhil Turner

3 hours ago
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Two rooms from Greenwich Palace, where Henry VIII and his daughters Mary I and Elizabeth I were born, have been unearthed in southeast London.

archaeology.org/news/5847-170816-london-tudor-palace

(Old Royal Naval College)
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Two rooms from Greenwich Palace, where Henry VIII and his daughters Mary I and Elizabeth I were born, have been unearthed in southeast London.

archaeology.org/news/5847-170816-london-tudor-palace

(Old Royal Naval College)

Salvatore Mirra, Angel Jose Cendron and 23 others like this

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Walker Black JohnnyMaybe the lead can explain Henry the VIII's desire to chop off his wives heads?

14 hours ago   ·  4

11 Replies

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Basit ShahWere they hobbits? The rooms seem pretty small.

15 hours ago   ·  3

9 Replies

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Iwona WarraichSo many excavations, civilizations buried deep in the ground. One thing comes to mind for a while now: what exactly happened around the globe to cause this, i.e. the burial of so many areas, cities, important venues? Is this something, some type of natural disaster phenomenon, that will recure, or a similar event will take the world by surprise? I'm leaning towards the least preferable answer

4 hours ago
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Hannah MacleanLove these small alcoves. Kept bees in them......maybe? These wealthy people were so self sufficient. Interesting, must keep track of the progress.

4 minutes ago
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Arlette BergaminiThe story states "two rooms ". How could 2 women (at different times ) give birth in those two alcove like places ? Story doesn't make sense. Big enough for possibly 2 bee boxes. Very small spaces with no room for much of anything

11 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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BJ Van LathumWhat an interesting discovery! They also found Richard 3 's grave !

12 hours ago

1 Reply

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Daniel O'NealHow many palaces did Henry VIII have, anyway?

14 hours ago

3 Replies

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Mary EdgecombThe arches are fireplaces not rooms...silly..

14 hours ago

2 Replies

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Roy PeersHeres a guy that hacked off his wives heads and its still our history, and were facinated by it. The poor americans need a lesson in this right now.

8 hours ago   ·  4
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Carole SemaineJean Locker this is what I was talking about the other day

2 hours ago
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Jean LockerAmazing !

1 hour ago
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Eleanor LeycestershyreHoorah for the discovery! Just reminds of one more reason why I dislike the Stuart dynasty!

11 hours ago
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Margaret StanbridgeWould love to be in on that excavation dig would be mega outstanding wondering what will be discovered next.xx

51 minutes ago
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Maggie Williamson ReidOh, were it that walls could speak!

15 hours ago   ·  8
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Scott HensiekJenny Graves thought you may like this

15 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Cindy Young WilsonVery cool! sure wish I could be there to see it!

14 hours ago

1 Reply

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Severin EdelbroekThose look like very small rooms. People must have been a lot smaller back then.

49 minutes ago
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Helen ChappellLooks cold and dirty.

14 hours ago
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Theresa Harvey Barber CraigLead glazed floors? I'll bet that was interesting.

15 hours ago
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Jan BoothAwesome!!!!

14 hours ago
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Marcellus Souza da SilvaFantástico

11 hours ago
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Matt ParcellPeople were tiny in the old days 😂

9 hours ago
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Princess TartanWow fantastic

14 hours ago
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Lisa Elkin FoxKaren benson

12 hours ago
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Jodi RauthThe brick work is fantastic

14 hours ago
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Portions of an ancient Roman villa that was occupied from the 2nd through 7th century have been unearthed on the island of Sicily.

archaeology.org/news/5846-170816-sicily-roman-villa

(University of South Florida)
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Portions of an ancient Roman villa that was occupied from the 2nd through 7th century have been unearthed on the island of Sicily. 

archaeology.org/news/5846-170816-sicily-roman-villa

(University of South Florida)

Angel Jose Cendron, Salvatore Mirra and 23 others like this

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JayJay BlanchieLooks like this was poorly constructed. Didn't they have zoning laws?

16 hours ago

2 Replies

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Becky McLaughlinMichelle Assaad Christina Hotalen

16 hours ago   ·  1

4 Replies

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Mary ChapmanGo, USF! Would love to be there!

15 hours ago
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Kelly DreyerWell they had a great view!

15 hours ago   ·  3
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Chancer HillBeachfront Villa .. <3

16 hours ago   ·  2
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CathyAnn Deewhat a beautiful color blue the water is...

14 hours ago
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Janina Cichoń LembkeBYLAM...

3 hours ago
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Liz WatkinsWow!

5 hours ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

16 hours ago   ·  1
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Diane Duby TeetsMichelle Teets

12 hours ago   ·  1
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Sarah VictoriaTaylah Egbers

13 hours ago   ·  1
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Noemi ConsiglioElio Ragusa

13 hours ago   ·  1
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William ViannaRoberta Ferritto ;)

16 hours ago
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Genetic analysis of human remains found at a 14,000-foot-high site in Tibet has helped reveal how people developed adaptations allowing them to thrive at extreme elevations.

archaeology.org/issues/268-1709/features/5816-tibet-high-altitude-adaptation

(Pawel Opaska / Alamy Stock Photo)
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Genetic analysis of human remains found at a 14,000-foot-high site in Tibet has helped reveal how people developed adaptations allowing them to thrive at extreme elevations.

archaeology.org/issues/268-1709/features/5816-tibet-high-altitude-adaptation

(Pawel Opaska / Alamy Stock Photo)

Hassan Shahmohammade, Richard Townsend and 23 others like this

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Christopher BackEveryone was so lucky, everyone was so kind, they were on the road to Shambala.

16 hours ago   ·  2
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K.w. LewisClean air

17 hours ago   ·  1
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Diane Belairpretty pic

11 hours ago   ·  1
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

17 hours ago
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Proteins and DNA found in medieval parchment manuscripts are helping to reveal which animals’ skins they were made from—and how they were handled by people.

archaeology.org/news/5807-170811-medieval-parchment-studied

(Courtesy the Chapter of York)
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Proteins and DNA found in medieval parchment manuscripts are helping to reveal which animals’ skins they were made from—and how they were handled by people.

archaeology.org/news/5807-170811-medieval-parchment-studied

(Courtesy the Chapter of York)

Maryann Fisher, Desiree Jean and 23 others like this

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Philip IsépyWhy on earth did they write like that? So needlessly complicated.

18 hours ago

13 Replies

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Sue MooreInteresting that most of the livestock used were female. I would have guessed male not female. Female livestock is used to reproduce over and over again and males are usually sold or slaughtered. You only need one bull or ram to cover a flock, etc. Females were valued more highly than the males on a farm in my experience. Do you have any insight as to why they used female livestock? I find that unexpected.

10 hours ago

1 Reply

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Joyce-Marie MorrinThe visual Message was just as much an art as were the words.

18 hours ago   ·  7

1 Reply

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Jim McGuireI wonder if any of these "parchments" will turn out to be human skin.???

13 hours ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Jessica SattlerThat is impressive that DNA research can be used to advance our knowledge of history this way!

14 hours ago   ·  2
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Richard KosackHope they are checking for palimpsests while they are at it!

14 hours ago
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Ilirjan MehmetiIn albania

18 hours ago
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Two complete skeletons have been discovered in an Anglo-Saxon cemetery on the Holy Island of Lindisfarne, off the northeast coast of England.

archaeology.org/news/5845-170815-lindisfarne-anglo-saxon-cemetery-skeletons

(Courtesy David Petts)
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Two complete skeletons have been discovered in an Anglo-Saxon cemetery on the Holy Island of Lindisfarne, off the northeast coast of England.

archaeology.org/news/5845-170815-lindisfarne-anglo-saxon-cemetery-skeletons

(Courtesy David Petts)

Greg Pader Demonteverde, Lisa Sabroe and 23 others like this

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David PettsHi- this is David from the Lindisfarne project. Given some of these comments I thought it would be useful to provide some further information. First, the only reason we know this area was a cemetery was because we found the skeletons- the excavation areas has been outside any active burial ground for at least a millennium and probably more and has been used as rough pasture for the last 200-300 years. Many of the burials were already badly disturbed in the medieval period by ploughing and other agricultural activity, and even the graves we excavated had been inserted through earlier graves and contained redeposited human bone. Medieval cemeteries were not places of permanent rest – and those being buried in them would have known this (because of the big chunks of human bone they themselves disturbed in digging their graves!). Once we’ve completed our work, we’ll be returning the bones to the Island and the burials will be redeposited on sanctified ground within the boundaries of the parish churchyard. Throughout the project we’ve received the full support of the Islanders whose ancestors these individuals were. Always happy to answer further questions 

24 hours ago   ·  17

3 Replies

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Gareth AngelbeckTwo complete skeletons discovered in a cemetery... shocking😂

2 days ago   ·  35

9 Replies

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Gary GaddThis is why I will be cremated. I don't want to wake up under a parking lot, sitting on the headlight of some clown's Harley, or being poked by some egghead.

2 days ago   ·  5

4 Replies

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Patrick JamesWe bury our dead for a reason.

2 days ago   ·  6

8 Replies

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Lola McGourtyI have mixed feelings. We can learn so much from the dead of ancient times since we cannot communicate directly. I think archeologists honor the dead by telling their stories. Now grave robbers who sell priceless artifacts are the blasphemers. Anyway, I plan to be cremated.

2 days ago   ·  8

1 Reply

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Kaili SaltAll those getting offended, it's not like the person is around anymore to care or any known relatives. I kind of like the idea of someone learning something from my skeleton. Its cool, discovering how ancient people lived. So it's ok to dig up really old skeletons or mummies, but because this is not as old, you are aghast. Quite hypocrytical on an archeology forum.

1 day ago   ·  3
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Shannon GodloveTo clarify, the archaeologists did not know there was a cemetery there before finding the bones and the charnel pit. The location of the cemetery WAS the discovery.

1 day ago   ·  4
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Lisa DrinkwaterFor goodness sake you lot, they'll be reinterred once the dig is complete. They'll be trying to find out how and why they died, what condition they were in, where they came from etc.

2 days ago   ·  4
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Sarah Vaughn FosterWell.. I just wanted to say that the local welding supply stores have argued with me about you (NASA) not knowing what you are talking about. I have been asking about glasses shade 12, 13 or 14 and they said I would "fry my eyes out" so. ... It's funny that they know more than y'all (they don't really and I have certified eclipse glasses)

17 hours ago
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Derek MarchantPerhaps there is now a case for compulsory plastic ID cards to be fixed to all future burial victims stating a preference exhume or not exhume or to be reinterred in a cardboard box in a centrally heated museum basement. Ha Ha

19 hours ago
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Sandro SublimiMonks?

2 days ago   ·  3

2 Replies

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Maria Estelle MejiaVikings often raided Lindisfarne. Wonder if these could be victims of such raids.

1 day ago   ·  4
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Paul Jerry WilliamsWhere else would one find skeletons?

2 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Nitham Ahmadwhat kind of holy?

2 days ago

2 Replies

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Charlie Wallaceis it really a discovery if you find a skeleton in a cemetery?

1 day ago   ·  1
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Robert WrayWait, Wait, wait ....... they found full Skeletons in a ........ Cemetery ?????? No Way !!!!!!!!!

1 day ago
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Hachimi OmarHamza Arkoubi haka ayl9awk manahna 500 ans wybdaw ygolo had siyad kan kaybol flavaboo hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

1 day ago
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Nitham Ahmadwhat do you mean by holly island.?

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Roger SislerOnly two in the cemetary?

2 days ago   ·  3
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Ralph CaffaletteWow who would have thought that would happen.

2 days ago   ·  2
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Joyce LotarskiImagine that ! Skeletons in a cemetery ..

2 days ago
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Deb SchoonSeriously where are the gloves!!!

1 day ago   ·  1
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Mark LubbeWhat did they expect..Dodo eggs!?

2 days ago   ·  1
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Josh SheffieldDid you not expect to find skeletons in a cemetery??

20 hours ago
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Peter WadeSkeletons in a cemetery, whodathunk.

1 day ago
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Three rock-cut tombs from the Ptolemaic era containing a number of sarcophagi of varied shapes and sizes have been discovered in Upper Egypt.

archaeology.org/news/5844-170815-egypt-ptolemaic-tombs

(Photo: Nevine El-Aref)
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Three rock-cut tombs from the Ptolemaic era containing a number of sarcophagi of varied shapes and sizes have been discovered in Upper Egypt.

archaeology.org/news/5844-170815-egypt-ptolemaic-tombs

(Photo: Nevine El-Aref)

Greg Pader Demonteverde, Jenny Grover and 23 others like this

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Julie Miller HamlinLove this magazine. Read it cover to cover within a day or two of receipt. I also love online site. ❤

15 hours ago
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James FiggittBeth Rogers what's an Egypt?

14 hours ago   ·  1
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Jennifer Jo EvansSo cool

1 day ago
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Nichola Winneyooh, a must read!

16 hours ago
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Nitham Ahmad؟

2 days ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

1 day ago
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Eleanor StirlingNichola Winney

21 hours ago
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Thousands of stone cubes used to create mosaics were found in the remains of a house in Jordan that was apparently destroyed in an A.D. 749 earthquake.

archaeology.org/news/5842-170815-jordan-umayyad-house-unearthed

(The Danish-German Jerash Northwest Quarter Project)
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Thousands of stone cubes used to create mosaics were found in the remains of a house in Jordan that was apparently destroyed in an A.D. 749 earthquake.

archaeology.org/news/5842-170815-jordan-umayyad-house-unearthed

(The Danish-German Jerash Northwest Quarter Project)

Jos Truscott, Cheryl Muir and 23 others like this

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Gretchen Robinsontesserae. 1 a small tablet (as of wood, bone, or ivory) used by the ancient Romans as a ticket, tally, voucher, or means of identification 2 a small piece (as of marble, glass, or tile) used in mosaic work

2 days ago   ·  1
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Mike SaboI was lucky enough to hold one from Pompeii that an Art History teacher had repatriated as a teen. It was one of the many reasons I stayed with Anthropology.

1 day ago   ·  1
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Seth JohnstonEither that, or it was the Las Vegas of the Ancient world...

2 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

1 day ago   ·  1
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A new theory connects the Uffington White Horse, the only prehistoric geoglyph known in Europe, with an ancient mythological tradition.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5830-trenches-england-prehistoric-uffington-white-horse

(Skyscan Photolibrary / Alamy)
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A new theory connects the Uffington White Horse, the only prehistoric geoglyph known in Europe, with an ancient mythological tradition.

archaeology.org/issues/269-1709/from-the-trenches/5830-trenches-england-prehistoric-uffington-white-horse

(Skyscan Photolibrary / Alamy)

Dean Overstrom, Hassan Shahmohammade and 23 others like this

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Morgan FernandezBefore the gods that made the gods Had seen their sunrise pass, The White Horse of the White Horse Vale Was cut out of the grass. Before the gods that made the gods Had drunk at dawn their fill, The White Horse of the White Horse Vale Was hoary on the hill. Age beyond age on British land, Aeons on aeons gone, Was peace and war in western hills, And the White Horse looked on. For the White Horse knew England When there was none to know; He saw the first oar break or bend, He saw heaven fall and the world end, O God, how long ago. For the end of the world was long ago, And all we dwell to-day As children of some second birth, Like a strange people left on earth After a judgment day. (from The Ballad of the White Horse by G.K.Chesterton)

2 days ago   ·  88

6 Replies

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Stuart SwannWe should never underestimate the power of symbols. The fact that this one has survived for 3000 years is both astonishing and instructive. No one knew what it meant but they still preserved it..... mmm 🤔

2 days ago   ·  36

2 Replies

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Therese MathewsI wonder why the Cerne Abbas Giant in Dorset, England is not considered a geoglyph by the authorities. Is it because of questions of its date of creation?

2 days ago   ·  15

3 Replies

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Duane OestreichThe sun moved across the sky before the glyph was created, why would anyone think that it was created to explain how the sun moved with the glyph or that the sun was pulled by it? That's like putting the cart behind the horse!!. I think they were just bored and said "lets dig it", you dig??

2 days ago   ·  1

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Patricia KelsallInteresting ! Is it not possible that there are similar geoglyphs but as yet undiscovered ? Maybe current satellite technology may assist in discovering them. Just a thought

2 days ago   ·  26

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Steven WeltyHere is why it was "likely" preserved: " when observed from a hill opposite, in midwinter, the sun rises behind the horse, and as the day progresses, seems to gain on the horse and finally pass it. From the same vantage point, at all times of the year, the horse appears to be galloping along the ridge in a westerly direction, toward the sunset." Nice!!

2 days ago   ·  18
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Lisa RogersI live not far from the white horse and the area around Swindon have several of them

1 day ago   ·  5

2 Replies

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Leonie IngramNext time Rosemary Allen??? Would so love to explore here ...

1 day ago

2 Replies

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Trish DogMagician MitchellIt's the Dawn Horse, obviously. Consider: there were no human flying machines in prehistoric Britain yet this geoglyph was created to be seen from the sky...?

2 days ago   ·  4
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Craig TolleyAdrian Peter Pete Dalton I remember when it was nearly a symbol of being a really bad idea for Pietro to let me have driving lessons in a landrover while doing Astro :) Wasn't it here we met the beeam men?

2 days ago   ·  1
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Belinda GilbertIt was a cold windy day Sandy Langlands but worth the effort to find this symbol.

4 hours ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Ann DugmoreIt is thought that the pattern of the White Horse has 'walked' up the hill over the years and the photograph seems to suggest that.

1 day ago   ·  2
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Mavis PalmerWhen we lived in England , we could see it from the second storey of our house on bower green .

2 days ago   ·  3

1 Reply

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Chris EllsworthIt's amazing to find artifacts this ancient and realize they were made to be seen from above.

2 days ago   ·  6

1 Reply

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Cassie GauldieZoe O'Donohue Rob O'D thats what I'm talking about

2 days ago

1 Reply

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Liz RobertsThank you, Jan, for spotting this about our local landmark at Harwell St Matthew's Friends. I'm going to share it to the HSMF page.

1 day ago
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Michael CassinI have a dumb question. How has it not grown over in 3000 years?

1 day ago

2 Replies

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Emily CleaverI attended the annual 'scouring' of the horse recently and wrote this article about it for the Smithsonian Magazine. www.smithsonianmag.com/history/3000-year-old-uffington-horse-looms-over-english-countryside-18096...

19 hours ago   ·  1
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Emily LoucksThe White Horse will forever remind me of Tiffany Aching, DiscWorld, and Terry Pratchett.

1 day ago   ·  4
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Steven WeltyOn XTC Settlement album cover. Very cool about the annual preservation actions

2 days ago   ·  5
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Sally PerryThe whole hill is full of history from the horse to the iron age fort to the ridgeway path

1 day ago   ·  5
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Pat AndrewsI am wearing my white horse tee-shirt today so this post delighted me when I found it on my Facebook page.

2 days ago   ·  5
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Todd R. UlicnyLooks great in Google Earth. Good article.

2 days ago   ·  6

2 Replies

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Jim KnappI love that XTC album!!!

2 days ago   ·  2
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Alisha PorterAren't white horses associated with high/wise goddesses or gods?

2 days ago   ·  3
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Archaeology Magazine updated their profile picture.

A painted pillar at Pañamarca in northwestern Peru depicting a priestess whose gesture suggests she is part of a Moche sacred ceremony or sacrifice is featured on the cover of our September/October 2017 issue: archaeology.org/issues

Explore more! Subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

Photo: Courtesy Lisa Trever
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A painted pillar at Pañamarca in northwestern Peru depicting a priestess whose gesture suggests she is part of a Moche sacred ceremony or sacrifice is featured on the cover of our September/October 2017 issue: archaeology.org/issues

Explore more! Subscribe to ARCHAEOLOGY: bit.ly/1l8PJQ8

Photo: Courtesy Lisa Trever

Isabelle Mansuy, Stephen Trever and 23 others like this

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Alexandre De Maia Cabritadoes anybody know what type of paint they used for painting, does anybody know if they used limewash and pigments ? please let me know i am researching on this...

2 days ago

4 Replies

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Todd A MathewsI love how detailed the chronicalers were in their conquest of that specific territory. Also like how they (spanish)kept turning on each other when they were colonizing. Also love the story where one of the spaniards hung a friar of his during an early conquest.it was over looking an indigenous grave. The symbolisms alone are cerimoniuos. Also a detailed account. Yeah I am of the mind that thats an indigenous territory. It was brutally conquered and taken. Should be returned.Just like all conquered indigenous lands on Anowara kowa.

2 days ago
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DarcyRodolfo Caparó-AragónMy question is about the wall paintings were used to decorate ceremonial environments or also residential palaces.

2 days ago
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Sean NiehoffJust got it yesterday, Now I'm looking for Back issues

2 days ago   ·  1
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Bonnie CageReishi D Alpacamama

2 days ago
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The foundations of two early-17th-century Portuguese churches have been uncovered on the island of Zanzibar, off the coast of Tanzania.

archaeology.org/news/5806-170811-zanzibar-colonial-excavation

(Professor Mark Horton)
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The foundations of two early-17th-century Portuguese churches have been uncovered on the island of Zanzibar, off the coast of Tanzania.

archaeology.org/news/5806-170811-zanzibar-colonial-excavation

(Professor Mark Horton)

Massimiliano Lattanzi, Kath Nashdoi and 23 others like this

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Craig Tolley20 yrs ago I had the good fortune to visit teh 16th century portugese fort and chapel on the Ilha de Mocambique. What i found mst impressive was teh water collection system that fed into a pair of huge underground cisterns.

2 days ago   ·  2
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Dave FudallyAh yes...Zanzibar...how I remember those thrills, the romance, the adventure....https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BniNxhwsD14

2 days ago   ·  3
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Angela GuttingFascinating place to go! I was there in 2002. The slave memorial was deeply moving.

2 days ago   ·  1
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Richard HobbyAre there more in Oman, UAE, Bahrain? The forts of Muscat and Mutrah and Bahrain had chapels too?

2 days ago   ·  1
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Cynthia HutchisonRead "The Conquerors" by Roger Crowley for more about the historical Portuguese.

2 days ago
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Tara InkpenJosh Rose we are going there

2 days ago   ·  1
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Barbara Hegazywow amazing

1 day ago
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Emelyn CroduaWow

2 days ago
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Magarifa GabriellaDomenico Bellato

2 days ago

1 Reply

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After defeating the Carthaginians in the 2nd Punic War, the Romans began minting their coins using silver mined on the Iberian Peninsula, a new geochemical study shows.

archaeology.org/news/5811-170814-rome-silver-coins

(Institute for Archaeological Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt)
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After defeating the Carthaginians in the 2nd Punic War, the Romans began minting their coins using silver mined on the Iberian Peninsula, a new geochemical study shows.

archaeology.org/news/5811-170814-rome-silver-coins

(Institute for Archaeological Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt)

Chandandeep Singh, Rajesh Poojari and 23 others like this

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Bruce M MarshallThis is so informative but could you please tell me what units of measurement are indicated by the scales alongside the coin ??

2 days ago

3 Replies

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Mark McInturffWhy silver? Why has silver and gold been valued so highly for so long? Easy to melt and reshape? I know that now it is valued in electronics, etc for its conductive properties but why was it valued way back when?

2 days ago

4 Replies

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Robert IrwinNo surprise there. Iberia was a major source of Carthaginian wealth. The Barcid family/clan held a major control over Iberian mining and Hannibal financed a large degree of his campaign by it.

2 days ago   ·  2
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Ben TyckoThe conditions of slave labor in the silver mines is a major blight on Roman glory.

3 days ago

2 Replies

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Víctor González FernándezEste es un ejemplo de que cada artefacto arqueológico, aunque parezca "repetido" contiene informacion única. La ley colombiana de patrimonio sumergido es inconstitucional.

2 days ago
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Haniel Adhar MarkradonnPfft Carthage had a chance to beat the Romans but they choked like Aroldis Chapman. The first "blown save" in world history.

3 days ago   ·  1
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Bill ColemanThat is ehy the Lebanese dont like Italians.They fear them.

24 hours ago
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Hubert De PaepeThe Romans s truck on there sertertius PAX Romano and senat us Consult o also ROMAN POWER IF YOU DONT E GREE WITH THAT THAN YOU ARE DIED 😢😢😢😢😢😢😢

3 days ago
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Giuseppe BenvenutiHannibal came so close to defeating the Romans...!

3 days ago
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Jason SmolinskiFreaking cool!

2 days ago   ·  1
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Els PetersDieneke Creemers

3 days ago   ·  1
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

3 days ago
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Youyou Ait YahiaOzalis Ben Akli Younsi

2 days ago
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Joe CiaccioAmanda

2 days ago
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A 106-year-old fruitcake that appears to still be edible has been discovered on Cape Adare in Antarctica.

archaeology.org/news/5810-170814-antarctica-scott-fruitcake

(Antarctica Heritage Trust)
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A 106-year-old fruitcake that appears to still be edible has been discovered on Cape Adare in Antarctica.

archaeology.org/news/5810-170814-antarctica-scott-fruitcake

(Antarctica Heritage Trust)

Mikley Negreb, Rajesh Poojari and 23 others like this

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Jc YnzunzaThis shows us 100 years ago people still hated these as gifts and never ate it😂

3 days ago   ·  244

19 Replies

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Shirley SessumFruit cake, like pemmican, was hard core survival food. Ancient people lived off this type of food during hard winter and famine. AND! If someone made a real, homemade fruit cake and put it in front of you without telling you it was fruitcake you would not be able to get enough.

3 days ago   ·  52

16 Replies

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Clinton HammondI'd cut a thick slice, toast it, slather it with crunchy peanut butter, and chow down!

3 days ago   ·  22

8 Replies

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Dee TharpWe got fruitcake in our MREs,some suggested we give them to the Seabees and use them to build things with,while others suggested launching them at the enemy.

3 days ago   ·  17

8 Replies

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Jamie d'Acacia KnottSo even sending them to Antarctica won't get rid of them....

3 days ago   ·  42
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Jillian Hudson HughesMindi Strahlendorf got you a Christmas gift. Slather some of your bog butter on.

3 days ago   ·  3

5 Replies

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Julius Quintus ValensI love cake especialy fruit cake, only i'm gluten intolerent !!! Wish i could eat it though🌝🌝

3 days ago   ·  4

4 Replies

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Kayleen SnappEven back then fruitcake was made to last eternity... what is it about fruitcake that it can still be good after 100 years..

3 days ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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Sandy Banyard FoxThat looks exactly like the Yule cake I make every year. If it's anything like mine, the alcohol alone will preserve it indefinitely, let alone sub-zero temperatures.

3 days ago   ·  27

1 Reply

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Julie ChristopherThat's because NO ONE eats them! Even 106 years ago! 😂😂😂 #sarcasm

2 days ago   ·  6

2 Replies

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Thomas BuckleyThey weren't edible 106 years ago, why would they be now?

3 days ago   ·  24
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Steven JohansenIf you read the article, it says that Scott was fond of this particular brand. Maybe he was saving it for his victory celebration after his successful return (which sadly never happened).

3 days ago   ·  4

1 Reply

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Jeremy WebbThat's been on Antarctica for a hundred years and "is still good?" Kill it with fire before it shapechanges into a second version of you and eats your lab partners! #TheThing

3 days ago   ·  4
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Mary SinclairI made a fruitcake for my dad once, but instead of using the disgusting candied citron, i used dried pineapple, dates, real cherries, and apricots, And it had a lot of mixed nuts in it. I wrapped it in a cheesecloth drenched in Amaretto -- my dad said it was the best fruitcake he'd ever had, and then my uncle Stan said so, too...then my brother wanted one, which I didn't make (LOL). I never tried it but my dad was an honest man and not prone to unwarranted praise. :-)

2 days ago   ·  4

1 Reply

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Josh KinzerJammie Kinzer and Ann Kinzer I think y'all are safe to eat that 20 yr old friendship cake from Granny's freezer lol

3 days ago   ·  4

2 Replies

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Nancy Mitchell GilliamA friend gave me a wonderful recipe that is basically all candied fruit and nuts (and not the fruit that is already mixed together). It only has barely enough flour and egg to hold it together while it bakes. It is sooo good that I froze it so I would not eat it until my stomach hurt. What I found it is that is is just as good frozen. 🙂

2 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Sarah FalveyPaul Falvey I know u love fruit cake. This ones vintage

2 days ago

2 Replies

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Kenneth TranIn the words of Steve1989: "Let's get that on a tray! NICE!"

3 days ago   ·  2

3 Replies

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Bryn TaylorI had heard that there were originally 4 Wise Men, but one of them was turned away because he brought fruitcake. Maybe this is where it ended up. Seriously though, fruitcake was made before all the sugary snacks we have today, so back in the days this cake was made, it really was a sweet treat. The sugars in this is exactly what makes it 'edible' for so long.

3 days ago   ·  6
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Edward DillonA scientific team of six men, Scotts' Eastern Party, spent an unexpected winter hunkered at Cape Adare with minimal supplies. Their story is of great depravity and shortage of food...Yet a fruit cake turns up?🤣

3 days ago   ·  3
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Melanie CraigHmm, mom made drunken fruit cake one year, come jan it was so alcohol soaked it nearly had fumes coming off it, was fabulous!

3 days ago   ·  5
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Jennifer HolmesMy grandmothers fruitcake included strong coffee, whiskey, brandy, and red wine, and no Citroen! Delicious! But you had to soak it once a month with a little rum or brandy and rewrap with cheesecloth. By Christmas it was "done"

1 day ago
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Sylvia HedgebethFor my wedding cake I made a fruitcake and every bite of it was gobbled up. Probably it just depends on how you make the cake itself and then also what you put in it. I made pound cake (from scratch) and put filberts, Brazil nuts and dates in the batter. I iced it, too, and made a luscious butter cream vanilla frosting.

2 days ago
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Justin Van EwykThankfully I was raised by TV and was taught that fruitcake is godawful and there was a horrible trend where people would force each other to eat it on Christmas.

3 days ago   ·  2
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Jim BobinskyI found a cake inside a refrigerator of a hotel that had been boarded up for 20yrs.It looked like a lime green shag Pillow.I took it outside and set it on a Picnic table.The seagulls devourered It! How did they knowww?

2 days ago
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A 3,000-year-old circular wall that was probably part of a dwelling that may also have had a ceremonial function has been unearthed in the suburbs of Cusco, Peru.

archaeology.org/news/5809-170814-peru-circular-wall-unearthed

(DDCC)
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A 3,000-year-old circular wall that was probably part of a dwelling that may also have had a ceremonial function has been unearthed in the suburbs of Cusco, Peru.

archaeology.org/news/5809-170814-peru-circular-wall-unearthed

(DDCC)

Chandandeep Singh, Judy Billman Grech and 23 others like this

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Todd A MathewsWhy is every site discovered a ceremonial site. Plenty of Spanish destroyed and killed those people regardless of the age. They were living there right up until the spanish invasions. Get a book and a clue!!!!!

3 days ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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Duane JohnsonSites and artifacts do seem to get the ceremonial tag applied quite easily sometimes for a variety of reasons I believe. If it's an archaeological site for one it might be ceremonial and if it's not and you imply that it is or might be you get more press coverage more funding through grants and if you have a big ego more notoriety for yourself. It also seems to me things get tagged ceremonial sometimes if it can't be fit in somewhere else. Objects of exceptional workmanship are tagged sometimes as ceremonial. For instance I've seen bifaces get tagged as ceremonial for no other reason then above-average workmanship or size and of course anytime you tag a artifact as ceremonial you get more money for it if you're a collector.

3 days ago   ·  4

4 Replies

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Alexandre RaposoYou should work harder and find out exactly why it was built for. Nobody is buying this "cerimonial" explanation anymore. I repeat Todd's comment: why is every site discovered a ceremonial site? Why every doll is a fertility goddess?

2 days ago
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Nitham Ahmadit's not sure that it was used as a ceremonial. it might be used as defence functions . this is archaeology no thing clear untill we desciver anew evidence.

3 days ago
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Terry PoulosTommy Papadakis they knew you were coming

3 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Joe AndersonUmmm, could it have been a kiln?

3 days ago

1 Reply

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JC Owens

2 days ago   ·  1
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Erin SinclairIt's always ceremonial...

2 days ago
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Adam E. WirthGeorge Monahan

2 days ago   ·  1
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

3 days ago
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The existence of a 10th-century Viking ring fortress in Denmark has been confirmed using advanced remote-sensing technology.

archaeology.org/news/5808-170811-denmark-viking-ring-fotress

(Goodchild et al / Antiquity 2017)
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The existence of a 10th-century Viking ring fortress in Denmark has been confirmed using advanced remote-sensing technology.

archaeology.org/news/5808-170811-denmark-viking-ring-fotress

(Goodchild et al / Antiquity 2017)

Hassan Shahmohammade, Eve Yagnik and 23 others like this

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Rhea StoneWhy would Pirates have a fortress in their homeland? Do you mean nordic fortress?

3 days ago   ·  4

29 Replies

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Jason M. ButlerI thought the blue part was water, but i dont see any in the article. If so Ben Salairo is right. It looks like a moated structure to the lower right o f the bridge. The way both are laid out youd swear that highway has been there for a thousand years. I still think the lakelike depression in the upper right of the image has a serpent in it.

3 days ago

5 Replies

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Ben SalarioIf you look to the little island near the bridge on the right you can also see the under water remains of what seems to be a tower

3 days ago
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Juliana SchmidtI can see at least 7 old roads and 3 more contructions apart from the fortress, that seem burried at the time of the scan... always loved this technique!

3 days ago
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Janice Eimen GoodmanAlways wanted to be an Archaeologist

3 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Hank Randallbeats the hell out of hanging out of a helicopter and shooting with false color infrared film ...

3 days ago
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Jason M. ButlerIs it me or does the lake to the right of tbe bright orange patch look like it has a serpent in it

3 days ago
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Nicklas Sällvi var på vikingamuseet och han dog typ på 1000talet, så inte bara att man har von knorring i släkten, men tja vi får snacka om det i helgen, du är bättre på att förklara

2 days ago
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Curtis ConnerIt is about time for technology to come into this field in a bigger way

3 days ago
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Nicklas Sällenligt leif härstammar man från hagbard viking, glömmer alltid, vet att det inte är handfaste men nåt liknande typ hårdhänt

3 days ago
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Nick ItoWhat does that even mean?

3 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Elena BeetsOn the south of the blue , to the right of the big road there are also to round holes. What are those?

3 days ago
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Tom TeetersWow! A Viking fortress in Denmark. Whoda thunk it.

3 days ago   ·  1
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Christopher D MaddenMaybe they got thor at someone?

3 days ago   ·  1
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Paolo StorchiItalo, Emanuela bello!

3 days ago

2 Replies

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Reba DiazWicked awesome!!!!

2 days ago
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Eduardo E. GarciaBig deal

2 days ago
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Edward CorcoranFascinating

2 days ago
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Christy PrattOohh... love it!!!!!

2 days ago
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Stephanie RomigThis is cool

3 days ago
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Justin HallLooks like more stuff around there too

3 days ago
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Jay EarleNice!

3 days ago
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Michal PurcellCan anybody say wow. ..

2 days ago
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Gtss Clamming💘 # The Viking Fortress thank you lucky ology

2 days ago
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Research on the proteins and DNA held in medieval parchment manuscripts is allowing scholars the opportunity to determine what animal materials they were made from, as well as how often they were handled by human beings.

archaeology.org/news/5807-170811-medieval-parchment-studied

(Wikimedia Commons)
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Research on the proteins and DNA held in medieval parchment manuscripts is allowing scholars the opportunity to determine what animal materials they were made from, as well as how often they were handled by human beings.

archaeology.org/news/5807-170811-medieval-parchment-studied

(Wikimedia Commons)

Beth Jones, Frans Flapper and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Anne LangsHildegard of Bingen, most likely used animal skins to produce her many manuscripts.

6 days ago
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Emanuel GebauerUnd es wird die Zeit kommen, da wird man den Schreiber klonen, der diese Handschrift im Scriptorium kopiert hat. :-D

6 days ago
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Geraldine Murfin-Shawbe interested to hear of this in relation to Hildegard of Bingen

6 days ago   ·  1
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Gretchen Robinsonall the better to indoctrinate the peons.

3 days ago
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Francis ZieglerEarly comic book art. Very religious.

5 days ago
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Stephen O'CurranI like the info you give us ! ......😎

6 days ago
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Brigitte KirbyMichael Gleeson🙂

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

5 days ago   ·  1
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Archaeologists have unearthed a fragment from an Iron Age statue of a woman, which once stood between 13 and 16 feet high, near the citadel of the Neo-Hittite capital of Kunulua in eastern Turkey.

archaeology.org/news/5805-170811-turkey-iron-age-statue

(Tayinat Archaeological Project)
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Archaeologists have unearthed a fragment from an Iron Age statue of a woman, which once stood between 13 and 16 feet high, near the citadel of the Neo-Hittite capital of Kunulua in eastern Turkey. 

archaeology.org/news/5805-170811-turkey-iron-age-statue

(Tayinat Archaeological Project)

Frans Flapper, Andrew Pontoni and 23 others like this

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Anne LangsChiseling of facial features after a regime change was also seen in Egypt!

6 days ago   ·  10

4 Replies

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Waheed AmarkhelDid someone chisel her face off?

6 days ago   ·  2

6 Replies

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Stephen BrandSadly, a common psychological tactic in war was/is to deface...literally...religious monuments and important landmarks to demoralize and destabilize the conquered. And as others have pointed out, when a new religion came along, they often felt compelled to supplant the previous religions by destroying their relics and building on their sacred sites.

5 days ago   ·  1
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Haluk GurelObviously it has been discovered long ago as the face has been chiseled off due to common Muslim practice. (It is a sin to show face's' in that religion).

5 days ago
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Luigi BertinoCould be possible the height of the statue be real? Was she a giant?

6 days ago   ·  1
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Jack HoltHow was it damaged? It looked like it was purposefully defaced. Bronze Age iconoclasts? Or something else?

5 days ago   ·  1
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Diana Oppelamazon woman is the statue they ruled at one time on another land then they left no food

5 days ago
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Elle Jaye KeysLove her curls 💕

5 days ago   ·  1
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Jay Chef Fett ButlerDid you just assume that statues gender ?! Lol I kid I kid

5 days ago   ·  1
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Zoherwiller JervisWHAAAAAT ????? THAT Tall ????

6 days ago
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Raj SinghSadly destroyed by Islamic conquest

5 days ago
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Riddhi ChatterjeeExciting..... Egypt is the ore of history and mystery......

4 days ago
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Arthur KerreyTania Crook Vocilka

5 days ago
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Jack Dougal ConnorAlex Salikan

5 days ago
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15,000-year-old human remains uncovered in southwestern England’s Gough’s Cave bear signs of cannibalism, including butchering marks—which appear to have been ritualistic at times— and tooth imprints.

archaeology.org/news/5803-170810-england-gough-s-cave

(Bello et al (2017); CCAL)
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15,000-year-old human remains uncovered in southwestern England’s Gough’s Cave bear signs of cannibalism, including butchering marks—which appear to have been ritualistic at times— and tooth imprints. 

archaeology.org/news/5803-170810-england-gough-s-cave

(Bello et al (2017); CCAL)

Fouzi Hadjadj Aoul, Maxine Dion and 23 others like this

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Tess ColeI have met sooo many people that want to argue that just because the native 'barbarians' of aboriginal peoples may have committed acts of cannibalism-NO european white ancestor of theirs would have done such a unthinkable act. I have always laughed in my mind. Now I have the science to back it up. The human condition is the human condition, and we can be sooo arrogant!

6 days ago   ·  13

12 Replies

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Steve CharlesWhat exactly is the difference between butchering marks and "ritualistic" butchering marks?

6 days ago   ·  6

8 Replies

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Patrick AustinThe other white meat

6 days ago   ·  1

4 Replies

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Melody Ann Etherington-WattsHuman teeth marks? How about animal teeth marks! Is there DNA testing that proves that humans cannibalized? And these teeth imprints are definitely human teeth-Homo Sapien Sapien not another Homo species? What defines ritualistic teeth markings?

3 days ago
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Jurre van den BoschWhat is the prove they actually eat the meat? They could have deflesht the bones and threw the meat away, keeping the bones for rituals. They would have known that the flesh would rot away.

5 days ago
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Lorne KelleyPlanet was a whole other thing, big changes were taking place, none good for humans. We don't realize how fortunate we humans still exist.

6 days ago   ·  1
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Chrissy Stevenson2 legged mutton... Look it up.

6 days ago

3 Replies

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Dirk LanceDefleshing for a Sky Burial is just as good of guess as anyone's.

6 days ago   ·  2
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Mary EdgecombHuman teeth aren't that strong.

5 days ago

2 Replies

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Michael Yohoreligion was based on hunger and guilt..a sacrifice and a ritual makes god happy and fills your belly from starvation

6 days ago   ·  1
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Marilyn O RyanWhy not food was scarce back thousands of years ago if it's dead eat it

5 days ago
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Giusy CapassoArturo Annucci il mio lavoro😍😍😍

6 days ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Αναστασία ΜανταρίνιZoe Xats κοκκαλακια μιαμ μιαμ

5 days ago

1 Reply

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Kate NowickiI read this as cave bear cannibalism at first.

5 days ago   ·  1
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John Roweis this what they refer to as a 'Paleo diet'? ;)

5 days ago   ·  1
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Andrew Gayleyi see that as primitive knurling

6 days ago   ·  1
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George McarthurI prefer kebab

6 days ago   ·  1
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Lisa ChiongWhere is the vomit emoticon?

5 days ago
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James RobbinsTastes like pork........

5 days ago
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John A PurcellAh well,boys will be boys....

4 days ago
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Krystal Stevensonwell waste not and all that stuff

5 days ago
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Tammie Bautz RousseauI'm thinking of 'White Heat'

5 days ago
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Janet Margaret🤮

6 days ago
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Joye J JoyeOne man's meat is another man's symposium.

3 days ago
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Jeanne PurintonProbably my ancestors

5 days ago
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A 900-year-old petroglyph in Chaco Canyon could depict a recorded solar eclipse that occurred over New Mexico on July 11, 1097, according to archaeologists and astrophysicists.

archaeology.org/news/5802-170810-chaco-canyon-eclipse

(University of Colorado)
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A 900-year-old petroglyph in Chaco Canyon could depict a recorded solar eclipse that occurred over New Mexico on July 11, 1097, according to archaeologists and astrophysicists. 

archaeology.org/news/5802-170810-chaco-canyon-eclipse

(University of Colorado)

Adrienne McClary, Laurel Kawalek and 23 others like this

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Todd A MathewsThere is no sutch thing as a missing people or culture. Only enslavement, conquest's and a migration and integration among the people......

6 days ago   ·  4

10 Replies

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Joseph V. ConiglioA tip regarding Chaco. The historians (be they archeologists though they can't be anthropologists because the people are missing) are very stingy with providing dates on the arts, pottery and culture. The culture of the area is far older.

6 days ago   ·  6

4 Replies

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Bob BenferTotal solar eclipses occur about once every 360 years in any given area by chance. So one can imagine how impressive it would be. I hope to see one September 21 in Missouri where, sigh, there is a 30% chance of clouds or rain.

6 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Ralph Gomezi see kokopelli...

6 days ago   ·  3

2 Replies

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Heliane GritschJames Mai Have a look at this article!!!

6 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Denise FenimoreIt pisses me off that "Ramon" had to write his name on this treasure! (Bottom right)

6 days ago   ·  6
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Matt ShawCenter image looks like LP cover art of "Red Octopus" by Jefferson Starship. Hmm...."rock" art?

6 days ago   ·  1
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Petko SlavovThe figure on the right is either playing a musical instrument, or blowing its brains out with a shotgun. :D

6 days ago
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Christopher C FunkIt was a recording of an ufo encounter much longer ago then what age they think this cave art is..

6 days ago
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Jan GarlandI wonder if they've named the guy with the backpack and the rifle on the right hand side.

6 days ago
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Clay L. WellerUnlikely, because ancient peoples viewed eclipses as bad omens.

6 days ago

1 Reply

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John Rapp"Some" archaeologists.

6 days ago
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Barb CookChaco also has a moon calendar. Amazing place.

6 days ago   ·  1
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Tracy LivezeyNo, that petroglyph is clearly The Dark Lord Cthulhu.

6 days ago
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Luis BlanchardThe word Chaco...in Argentina 's north.....is a province...

6 days ago
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Ralph Gomez

Attachment6 days ago
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Cheryl Ingram CrumGreat place to visit and camp

6 days ago
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John Morgan BegayIts all lies!!!

5 days ago
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Mike KernodleAll true except the photo is not of the petroglyph

5 days ago
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Jesse DavinciJon snow and khaleesi first discovered that 👍

5 days ago
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Ron BurtonElectric Universe glyphs!

5 days ago
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Robert E. PriceBeen there; seen that.

6 days ago
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Riddhi ChatterjeeIts a great cave painting....thank u fr sharing

5 days ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

6 days ago   ·  1
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Suzanne ArtleyJoan Mieritz

6 days ago   ·  1
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The 13 million-year-old, baseball-sized skull of an infant Miocene ape, which was discovered sticking up out of the ground in Kenya’s Turkana Basin, could help help scientists learn more about the last common ancestor of modern apes and humans.

archaeology.org/news/5801-170810-ancestral-ape-fossil

(Fred Spoor)
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The 13 million-year-old, baseball-sized skull of an infant Miocene ape, which was discovered sticking up out of the ground in Kenya’s Turkana Basin, could help help scientists learn more about the last common ancestor of modern apes and humans. 

archaeology.org/news/5801-170810-ancestral-ape-fossil

(Fred Spoor)

Adrienne McClary, Borna Merc and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Peter SmallwoodNight gibon not a link the Tolkien theory is proving that Darwin was a Eugenie schmuck sorry alot of these animals lived with modern men there a clue catch it.

7 days ago   ·  1

27 Replies

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Teena MedlockThere is NO link between apes and humans!

6 days ago

9 Replies

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Deborah HoltHe had pretty big eye sockets bet he could see at night real well

7 days ago   ·  2

3 Replies

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Carol LongWe are NI T FROM APES OR MONKEYS

7 days ago   ·  3

8 Replies

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Dirk LanceKenya? 🤔 Who do we know from there?

7 days ago

4 Replies

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Clayton AdamsI expect this will bring out the religious knot heads...

7 days ago   ·  10
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Douglas MeadLooks kinda like a Sleestak skull from the old Land of the Lost show.

7 days ago   ·  9

1 Reply

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Ron BikacsanThose common ancestors could probably run the White House better than the current throwbacks.

6 days ago   ·  2
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Kasia EndlerEmmy Casper if i could be any of the homos i would be this one

6 days ago
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Avi GolubchikHave any of you guys looked up the site Maropeng in South Africa go and see what was found there !! Just saying!

6 days ago
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Jean-jacques Civaleroil me semble qu'il tient dans la paume d'une main si c'est celui entre aperçu il y a qq jours

7 days ago
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Onaika Alexandra NathanHobaaaaa hahahahahahahahha Natas Straker bo mester por rekonose di ken e kabes aki ta

7 days ago
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Seamus RidgellMy. What big eyes he has

7 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Rasec Otsugua Sanedrac SelaromEste cráneo no es de simio es un alíen

6 days ago
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Rick MasselHumans and apes never had a common ancestor.

6 days ago
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Deborah Holt13 million yrs old thats quite a find then

7 days ago   ·  3
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Tricia Hudson BramsonThat is no ancestor of mine!

6 days ago   ·  1
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Suphannahon SinualNatr Natr เรื่องนี่น่าสนใจลองอ่านสิ

6 days ago
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Eric MorganScience!

6 days ago   ·  1
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Jim McGuireSoftball or hardball size????

6 days ago
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Lauren EstephaniHis eyes!!! 👽

5 days ago
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Ma Aurora Carla OrtizThose are big eye sockets 😁

6 days ago
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Tim Tempestcommon ancestor?

6 days ago
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Michael ScarboroThat's a Sleestak skull!

6 days ago
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A 2,000-year-old workshop that manufactured vessels such as stone mugs and bowls, which were carved from chalkstone and thought to have been produced in accordance with Jewish ritual law, has been discovered in Lower Galilee in Israel.

archaeology.org/news/5800-170810-galilee-stone-vessels

(Samuel Magal, IAA)
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A 2,000-year-old workshop that manufactured vessels such as stone mugs and bowls, which were carved from chalkstone and thought to have been produced in accordance with Jewish ritual law, has been discovered in Lower Galilee in Israel. 

archaeology.org/news/5800-170810-galilee-stone-vessels

(Samuel Magal, IAA)

Adrienne McClary, Carol Gazda and 23 others like this

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Alan Lewis"All right, but apart from the sanitation, medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, the fresh water system and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?"

4 days ago
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Linda SmithEven they needed their cup of Java on Monday mornings !

6 days ago   ·  2
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James McCuanSeriously? A bowl had to made according to "ritual law".

6 days ago
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Monica CritchlowSariah Peer Batt do you get this page/feed?

6 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Nitham Ahmadare you sure with Jewish ritual law

6 days ago

1 Reply

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Brenda J. MooreVery interesting.

6 days ago
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Bachar KhleifPalestin

6 days ago
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Richard KingThey found an original Starbucks. 😀

6 days ago
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Colin Macdonald Marilyn GrantSion Judah

5 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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LM BucklewBradley Hamm

7 days ago

1 Reply

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Boudy Bahriyou meant PALESTINE ???????????

6 days ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

7 days ago
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An analysis of two teeth found in a Sumatran cave in the 19th century has proven the presence of Homo Sapiens on the Indonesian island between 63,000 and 73,000 years ago, suggesting modern humans left Africa earlier much earlier than previously thought.

archaeology.org/news/5799-170809-sumatra-human-tooth

(Tanya Smith and Rokus Awe Due)
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An analysis of two teeth found in a Sumatran cave in the 19th century has proven the presence of Homo Sapiens on the Indonesian island between 63,000 and 73,000 years ago, suggesting modern humans left Africa earlier much earlier than previously thought. 

archaeology.org/news/5799-170809-sumatra-human-tooth

(Tanya Smith and Rokus Awe Due)

Adrienne McClary, Nicole Dunigan and 23 others like this

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Matthew Daywhoah there! Firstly, what the heck is 'electron spin dating', and why the 10,000 year range? Secondly, if, according to DNA evidence Australian Homo s. sapiens left Africa 73,000 years ago, that does not leave them much time to get from Africa to Indonesia. Human dispersal models can barely accommodate such a rapid movement. And here's a BIG question, if Neanderthals and Denisovians are represented in Australian Aboriginal sequences, and the Denisovian and Neanderthal interbreeding events were clustered around 50,000 - 30,000 years ago, in the Levant, Europe, and likely near the Denisova cave then how and where did Australian Aborigines ancesters meet Denisovians and Neanderthals? Either the dating is incorrect, or the genomic record of modern Aboriginals is incorrect, or both Neanderthals and Denisovians made a special trip to Indonesia to breed with homo sapiens? IF this is correct, then it implies not one, but more than one successful voyage to Australia. Earlier ones minus Neanderthal and Denisovan, plus later ones bringing along the new genetic material?

7 days ago   ·  16

9 Replies

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Doug TaylorMy belief over the last 50 years is man evolved more or less separately in Asia, and Africa, because we have been in Asia a very long time. Perhaps too long to have come out of Africa. The numbers have never added up.

7 days ago   ·  3

3 Replies

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LeeAnn JeyakaranGetting messy for those reluctant to reconsider origins 😊

7 days ago   ·  9

4 Replies

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Scott SuarezNitpicking, but only because I work to teach this to my students: Homo sapiens. Not Homo Sapiens.

6 days ago   ·  3

3 Replies

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Niall BreathnachIt would be really interesting to read something like Clan of the Cave Bear with all this new information - what a rich world it would offer at the crossover periods for Homo Sapiens, Neanderthalensis, and further east, Floresiensis and the Denisovans.

7 days ago   ·  1
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Robert VaughanI thought that the "out of africa" theory has been expanded? And that there were now thought to be at least three points of human evolution and migration.

6 days ago   ·  1
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Jeff Kennett Sr.And don't forget that if you actually follow the DNA evidence then there is plenty to show that the "out of Africa" story is not reality.

6 days ago   ·  1
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Erin BellOrrrr maybe they were always there? 😉

7 days ago   ·  7

5 Replies

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Caterina LillisI took a DNA test with ancient ancestry results. It makes me look at these years alot different now, and their impact on my future elders.

7 days ago
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Matthew HoltWhat about Graecopithecus freybergi ? It was discovered in the Mediterranean and said to be significantly older than any African hominid by some 200k years or so.

6 days ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Steven CorradiIt looks like they also had access to ultra-fine point Sharpies.

7 days ago   ·  2
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Chris KellerModern humans migrated INTO Africa. Not the other way around.

6 days ago
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Roberto BevilacquaSo that prove maybe that Homo sapiens sapiens and Homo florisiensis met in the past ?

7 days ago
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Eric Hongistocrazy...and it would take 5-6k years to get to Indonesia from the horn?

7 days ago
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Adam YoungPreviously thought by whom? Not everyone is a blind follower of idiocy.

6 days ago
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Dennis McMurrayWill this help us get along with each other?

7 days ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Rodney MorganToo bad humans didn't actually start in Africa.....

6 days ago   ·  1
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Joey DoyleOr their tree wasn't in Africa!!!

6 days ago
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Ivan Savicmodern human isnt from africa...they come from balkan ..europe

6 days ago
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Fernando M. Tabárez RienziWoah, woah. What about kangz?

7 days ago   ·  1
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Garet CumminsWhat about stork theory?

6 days ago
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Alistair SwintonOut of Africa😂

7 days ago
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Matthew SimpkinOut of Africa, is a myth

6 days ago
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Jack RadovichThey need it a good dentist

6 days ago
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Yan BouchardAs much primitive than ever.......

5 days ago
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Archaeologists have begun to re-asses artifacts from a site near the northern tip of New Zealand, first excavated in the early 1980s, which appear to line up with the arrival of the first Polynesians in the area some 700 years ago.

archaeology.org/news/5798-170809-polynesians-moturua-island

(Ogwen, via Wikimedia Commons)
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Archaeologists have begun to re-asses artifacts from a site near the northern tip of New Zealand, first excavated in the early 1980s, which appear to line up with the arrival of the first Polynesians in the area some 700 years ago. 

archaeology.org/news/5798-170809-polynesians-moturua-island

(Ogwen, via Wikimedia Commons)

Nicole Dunigan, Andie Mccuiston and 23 others like this

Lee Kathleen HallThat recently?

7 days ago   ·  1
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Ellyn Parker-Neal😳

7 days ago
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Scientists are attempting to solve the mystery of where Ancestral Puebloan groups went when they left Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde some 800 years ago by tracking their movements through DNA samples taken from the remains of domesticated animals such as turkeys.

archaeology.org/news/5797-170809-migration-turkey-dna

(Lupin, via Wikimedia Commons)
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Scientists are attempting to solve the mystery of where Ancestral Puebloan groups went when they left Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde some 800 years ago by tracking their movements through DNA samples taken from the remains of domesticated animals such as turkeys. 

archaeology.org/news/5797-170809-migration-turkey-dna

(Lupin, via Wikimedia Commons)

Beth Jones, Andie Mccuiston and 23 others like this

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Mark ZiolkowskiGabi Berlin, I know you can't read the article on your phone so the text is as follows, NORMAN, OKLAHOMA—Where did the Ancestral Puebloans go when they left Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde some 800 years ago? According to a report in Science Magazine, scientists led by molecular anthropologist Brian Kemp of the University of Oklahoma are attempting to track the Ancestral Puebloans through DNA samples taken from the remains of their domesticated animals. The researchers extracted mitochondrial DNA from turkey bones found at archaeological sites near Mesa Verde in southwestern Colorado, and compared it to genetic material obtained from turkey remains in the northern Rio Grande region, where the Ancestral Puebloans are long thought to have migrated and joined the ancestors of the Tewa Pueblo. The study suggests that after the year 1280, the previously unrelated groups of turkeys shared clusters of genes. “The people who collected these turkey bones had no idea that one day we would get DNA out of them and use them to answer questions about ancient human migration,” said team member Scott Ortman of the University of Colorado, Boulder. To read about the archaeology of the Puebloan peoples, go to "The First American Revolution."

7 days ago   ·  7

9 Replies

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Suz PicardNot sure why so many people commenting don't think this is a wild turkey. North America has two versions of wild turkeys and one looks exactly like this. www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wild_Turkey/id

6 days ago   ·  2

4 Replies

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Donna JoslynYou can bet they didn't go anywhere with such fragile overbred turkeys like this one. Can't Archaeology find a picture of a wild turkey? One that doesn't risk breaking its own legs because it's bred to be so heavy?

6 days ago

4 Replies

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Richard D. FisherAnasazi Turkey looked nothing like the bird pictured. Let us post pictures and I will show you a real Anasazi Turkey!

Attachment7 days ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Annie Bickfordyes I've seen thos pictures of Chaco Canyon which they showed with this news, but I was wondering how much of it is reconstructed and how much original. It looked v intact.

6 days ago
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Richard D. FisherFollow the T shaped doorways and Scarlet Macaws is the very best and most reasonable solution. Domestic turkey is a rather long shot as Anasazi Turkeys were only semi domesticated and interbreed with wild animals, maybe exactly the same as the wild ones. The Turkey came in for corn but meny or most were semi wild breeds and mostly used for feather blankets and clothing not so much eaten. There is no sign that Anasazi "selectively breed" anything, The dogs were the only domestic animals. Also leading to severe anemia. Soon I will have out the book "The Migration of the Scarlet Macaw Clan" which follows their migration rather exactly.

Attachment7 days ago
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Irene De Luis BallesterosNatalia Calvente Vera mira cómo va ya... Se me hace mayor 😢

6 days ago

1 Reply

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William WurzbachAncestral Puebloan groups went into the stomachs of other Ancestral Puebloan groups, mystery solved.

4 days ago   ·  1
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Jack Dougal ConnorClaire Halley should have don't your PhD on this instead

6 days ago
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Kevin M. Palanclever solution! Can't wait to hear the result.

7 days ago   ·  4
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Christophe Fluneau

Attachment7 days ago   ·  2
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Gerry WhiteChaco Canyon, a great place to visit.

6 days ago
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Dawn Birdsong Vadbunker OlmstedClever! Great idea!!!

6 days ago
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Deborah HoltPretty bird. Cmon pretty bird my roasting pan is waiting fa ya here pretty bird

6 days ago
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Marie Blacksher-PedersenNed good stuff for ANT201.

7 days ago
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Yoni BrukirerWhat the heck is that thing

4 days ago
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GT RyanGobble gobble, gob gobble gobble gobble gob. Gobololobobobollol!

6 days ago
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Emma Harperlook at this birb Lucy

7 days ago
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Altan ErarslanKabarama kabarama kel Fatma...

7 days ago
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Lori AllenMatt Allen

6 days ago
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Wilfried GirostRomain Gosnet

6 days ago
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When Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79, it covered Herculaneum’s Villa of the Papyri with a 600-degree Fahrenheit wave of gas and ash, carbonizing and, surprisingly, preserving nearly 1,800 papyrus scrolls that make up the only surviving library from antiquity. Given the fragility of the scrolls, scholars must continuously devise new methods and adapt new technology to uncover the masterpieces they contain. #BookLoversDay

archaeology.org/issues/175-1505/trenches/3166-trenches-italy-herculaneum-papyri-scanned

(Courtesy Vito Mocella/Nature Publishing Group)
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When Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79, it covered Herculaneum’s Villa of the Papyri with a 600-degree Fahrenheit wave of gas and ash, carbonizing and, surprisingly, preserving nearly 1,800 papyrus scrolls that make up the only surviving library from antiquity. Given the fragility of the scrolls, scholars must continuously devise new methods and adapt new technology to uncover the masterpieces they contain. #BookLoversDay 

archaeology.org/issues/175-1505/trenches/3166-trenches-italy-herculaneum-papyri-scanned

(Courtesy Vito Mocella/Nature Publishing Group)

Beth Jones, Andrew Pontoni and 23 others like this

View previous comments

Christopher LeeI'm really surprised that Anastasia hasn't been on here like flash trying to claim this as 'evidence' that anyone who wrote in Greek must have been genetically Greek and therefore the Romans were Greeks.

1 week ago   ·  16

41 Replies

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Chris RobinsonIve noticed that Archaeology Magazine has a bad habit of constantly recycling the same stories. This one was first published over two years ago! Is there no more archaeology news then?

1 week ago   ·  11

16 Replies

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Dimitrios DoulgeridisIt's greek

1 week ago   ·  12

18 Replies

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Mark MadisonFunny I am surprised Black Liberation Theologists are not on here saying Romans and Greeks were black. They seem to be on every ancient history site spewing their nonsense.

1 week ago   ·  10

12 Replies

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Jo JackSo what do they say?

1 week ago   ·  1

8 Replies

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Udo KreinI am stunned by the scientific possibilities and the findings that might be uncovered in the future! You just got to love science! 😁

1 week ago   ·  21
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Satria QuaijtaalWhat's up with Assurbanipal's library, isn't that considered a library anymore? And what of all the cuneiform archives, for example the one from Puzriš-Dagan, which stems from around 2100 BCE? Isn't that antiquity??

1 week ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Paul FortescueA B C D E F

1 week ago

6 Replies

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Tom HauptPoopyprus? 🤣

1 week ago   ·  45

3 Replies

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George LydaRasputin

1 week ago

4 Replies

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Giorgio BulgarelliIn the Electrical Engineers Handbook (McGraw Hill, New York, 1933), F.F. Foyle wrote: ‘To express quantitative relations exclusively in the English units is to conceal their meaning, to a greater extent, from all but English speaking peoples; and also to discredit them scientifically, by implication.’

1 week ago
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Alessandro Marazzinot really in good shape

1 week ago

3 Replies

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Pasquale CarilloThe only surviving library from antiquity!!! It's fantastic!!!📚😉

1 week ago   ·  3
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Denis ČernýI don't want to be rude but I think it looks like a s###.

1 week ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Hubert De PaepeI am visit Herculanium and Pompei and the Museum of Napol I I seen the wal l Coming from Pompei Alexander The Graet make war on Darius lll wonderfull Hubert from Belgium ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤ ❤

1 week ago   ·  6
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Damian ŁójPhilosophian text good; historian the best. Anybody knows about hisorical text discoverd in papiry Villa?

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Brian Lovett WhiteI am astonished... Just by chance the the first six letters of the Greek alphabet. What were the possibilities.. ?

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Aditi DubeyBryan Lee Ancient Scrolls!

1 week ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Hank VarrichioWonder if they are just grocery lists?

1 week ago   ·  3
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Buçk HowellIt's cool, everybody calm down, this is clearly a coporolite.

1 week ago   ·  3
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Tina MaasI only hope they can get more information on this period of time.

1 week ago   ·  2
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Gordon WatsonI thought it was a fossilized jobby.

1 week ago   ·  6

1 Reply

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Jeff KrischanoI thought that was a hot dog from the old days when my dad would BBQ!

1 week ago   ·  1
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Chris BallI'm really glad you explained that otherwise I would have thought it was a charred cucumber! Please just ignore me.

7 days ago   ·  1
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David NemeyerKaralynn here's some more ancient volcano stuff, since we were talking about it the other day.

1 week ago
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A collection of 50 carved bone ornaments decorated with circular indentations, which are estimated to have been made between 4,000 and 1,500 years ago, has been found southern India.

archaeology.org/news/5796-170809-india-bone-ornaments

(Department of Archaeology and Museums, Telangana)
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A collection of 50 carved bone ornaments decorated with circular indentations, which are estimated to have been made between 4,000 and 1,500 years ago, has been found southern India. 

archaeology.org/news/5796-170809-india-bone-ornaments

(Department of Archaeology and Museums, Telangana)

Beth Jones, Adrienne McClary and 23 others like this

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Luis Blanchardcircle ,or concentric circles have been for a long time a fertility simbol : the vulva......they are common in America...

1 week ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Halil GöksuAt the first glance these are eyes. But vertical eye is the sex organ of a woman. So this is an obvious Mother Earth Symbol. Black Stone at the corner of Kaaba in Mecca is a good example for that. = Holy Mary = Kybele = etc.

7 days ago
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Matthew DayCurrency? The standardisation is interesting. There could be very specific reasons for identical size and shape, ornaments would not generally need to be standardised to that extent. Maybe they are inlays for precise placement?

7 days ago
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Kat Davisthat's nice...context?? The article isn't really helpful.

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Eren AydoganOn the facebookpage of The British Museum you can find an new/recent post on a find regarding a "The Great Shrine" in India. The Buddha in the image has the same circular patterns on its feet. Very impressive.

7 days ago
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Robert WhiteWhy such a wide timespan? They can't have been carbon dated!

1 week ago   ·  1
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Zafer Al-assadCan be theater entrance ticket

1 week ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Robert AugustProbably some kind of gambling token. ... or early cracker jack prise.

7 days ago
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Eren AydoganThey look the same as the ones on Gavrinis Island, beautiful!

1 week ago   ·  3
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Leo HollandFirst backgammon board?😀

1 week ago   ·  3
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Richard GradyArchaeology Magazine. Was the bone material human?

1 week ago   ·  2
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Lemuel Wagame pieces

1 week ago
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Freddy VelaSo this is post Indus Valley Civilization?

1 week ago   ·  1
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Kathrina Wilhelmpractice?

1 week ago
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Ralf OliveiraLooks like a UFO

1 week ago
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Adrian Gheorgheancient coins?

1 week ago
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Riddhi ChatterjeeLove it

4 days ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

1 week ago   ·  1
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Dtc WhatelseAnnick Thuet

1 week ago
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Archaeologists have discovered new evidence of wintertime Indo-European initiation rituals that took place between 1900 and 1700 B.C. on the Russian steppe, and linked young warriors with dogs or wolves.

archaeology.org/news/5795-170808-bronze-age-wolf-rituals

(Courtesy David Anthony)
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Archaeologists have discovered new evidence of wintertime Indo-European initiation rituals that took place between 1900 and 1700 B.C. on the Russian steppe, and linked young warriors with dogs or wolves.

archaeology.org/news/5795-170808-bronze-age-wolf-rituals

(Courtesy David Anthony)

Beth Jones, Andie Mccuiston and 23 others like this

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Thomas DroppelmannOne wonder what possessed Europeans to decimate their enviroment the way Semites have?

1 week ago

9 Replies

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Warren RobertsThe Wolf Rites of Winter (link in this article) was published in 2013. I use it in my linguistic anthropology classes. Sometimes our subfields don't work together as well as they could. A favorite quote from Wolf Rites: Despite the rich picture of ancient life that can be drawn of ancient life in this way, many archaeologists are hesitant to trust reconstructed PIE word roots and concepts. “This is the kind of information that prehistoric archaeologists would normally kill to have,” says Anthony, “but they generally distance themselves from Indo-European linguistics because they can’t really see how the two sets of data can be combined.” Anthony has spent much of his career trying to convince his colleagues that the efforts of linguists and mythologists shouldn’t be ignored. “I’m interested in combining linguistic and mythological evidence with archaeological evidence,” he says. “These roots contain information about kinship, systems of honor, systems of debt, lordship, and feasting. We ought to be mining this vocabulary to figure out what was going on in their minds.”

6 days ago   ·  1
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Jeff Sissonsmultispecies archaeology😊

1 week ago
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Adam DunnThis has been known for a long while.

1 week ago
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Wendy MottCattrina Mott

1 week ago
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A Buddha statue has been discovered among the remains of a 12th-century hospital at Angkor Thom in Cambodia by a team of researchers who, just last week, uncovered the six-foot tall statue of a guard nearby.

archaeology.org/news/5794-170808-cambodia-angkor-buddha-statue

(Im Sokrithy)
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A Buddha statue has been discovered among the remains of a 12th-century hospital at Angkor Thom in Cambodia by a team of researchers who, just last week, uncovered the six-foot tall statue of a guard nearby.  

archaeology.org/news/5794-170808-cambodia-angkor-buddha-statue

(Im Sokrithy)

Andrew Pontoni, Andie Mccuiston and 23 others like this

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Laura Scott FerroAngkor is a magical place, so glad I got to visit it. I certainly left with the impression that this was a very advanced society, perhaps moreso than the Meso-American societies that were rising at about the same time.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Todd A MathewsIs this what happened when the united states carpet bombed them in the 50's-60's?

1 week ago   ·  2
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Janet FullingtonThat's the best kind of karma 🙌🏼

1 week ago   ·  1
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

1 week ago   ·  1
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The remains of a 3,000-year-old warrior who was buried holding a dagger in one hand and a knife in the other, as if expecting combat in the afterlife, have been discovered in the Siberian town of Omsk.

archaeology.org/news/5793-170808-siberian-warrior-unearthed

(Channel 12/The Siberian Times)
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The remains of a 3,000-year-old warrior who was buried holding a dagger in one hand and a knife in the other, as if expecting combat in the afterlife, have been discovered in the Siberian town of Omsk. 

archaeology.org/news/5793-170808-siberian-warrior-unearthed

(Channel 12/The Siberian Times)

Beth Jones, Andrew Pontoni and 23 others like this

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Nathan BoisvertHow can you tell the difference between a knife and a dagger? Still cool though

1 week ago   ·  6

13 Replies

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Raymond Simanjuntakhow d'you know thats a he or a she?. And a warrior too, not a hunter?

1 week ago   ·  4

4 Replies

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Geert CuypersA 3000 y.o. warrior? People sure got old in those times, Or should it be the 3000 year old remains of a warrior???

1 week ago   ·  10

1 Reply

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Matt GreenhillJulia Mikhailova told your mum there's archaeology in Siberia 😂

1 week ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Peter LavAnd a plate covering one eye?

1 week ago   ·  7

5 Replies

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Myrna RosaSo many people have died in this world through centuries and centuries and centuries and they find one body or maybe two or three and just one plays what's that about

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Jeff MillerUnless the 'knife' and 'dagger' had different symbolic meanings than they do in our current culture. In some ancient cultures, knives and daggers represented 'cutting through' and 'penetrating' but not in a context of war, violence, or defense ... rather in a context of perception (which was believed to continue after physical death).

1 week ago   ·  2
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David ArnoldHe should not be disturbed.

1 week ago   ·  4

5 Replies

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John MurrayMaybe he was a chef 😂

1 week ago   ·  5

2 Replies

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Jose ZapataJose Diaz hell yea screw these normal funerals

1 week ago   ·  1

2 Replies

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Keyska VladimirovnaSo its definitly a male? Are you positive.? I thought it was a female..... who died a awful brutal death

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Tiffany MertsisLaila Hack Lauren Mason siiiiiiiick

1 week ago

6 Replies

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Megan WaltersNah, he needs the dagger for protection and the knife for eating and utilitarian purposes.

1 week ago   ·  2
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Christopher LeeI'm surprised that Anastasia hasn't tried to claim that they're Greek.

1 week ago
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Nikita SobolevIn Omsk, both life and death are spent in brutal combat...

1 week ago
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Ismail D'AmatoSo 3000 years ago people were already dying for a battle they did not own...

1 week ago
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Ali Razawhy life after death, why not they honor their fallen warrior to buried with is dagger and knife

1 week ago
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Mary EdgecombHumans and other primates still kill each other...I wonder if its an inherited trait.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Sergey Komolovexperts believe that the buried warrior was revered or belonged to the nobility

1 week ago
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Pat PiraniHe figured he would wake up in Chicago, be ready

1 week ago   ·  2
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Dennis WheelerBrought a knife to a gun fight.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Jason Livingston... Show to Matt Sara

1 week ago   ·  1
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Michael KunzLooks like he was wearing a pirate eye patch too.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Timothy BergenThe dagger was made of Valerian steel.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Micheal PowerMaybe he was a chef?

1 week ago
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DNA evidence suggests that Viking fishermen freeze-dried cod and transported it from the Arctic to Germany hundreds of years before the first recorded use of salt to preserve fish in Norway in the 1690s.

archaeology.org/news/5792-170808-viking-cod-transportation

(James Barrett)
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DNA evidence suggests that Viking fishermen freeze-dried cod and transported it from the Arctic to Germany hundreds of years before the first recorded use of salt to preserve fish in Norway in the 1690s. 

archaeology.org/news/5792-170808-viking-cod-transportation

(James Barrett)

Beth Jones, Michael A Roland and 23 others like this

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Michael HodgesThis appears to be a "work of cod" that is beyond all understanding.

1 week ago   ·  9

2 Replies

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Gtss Clamming# Eskimos live on that an no any machines chemicals in the name to destroy the #Antarctic

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Mauro BuonincontriAnd then baccalà

1 week ago

2 Replies

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Martin CobhamA dodgy practice at best, resulted in many a stomach hake..

1 week ago   ·  1
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Gtss ClammingSo it possible what too still notice and long cod#we 👀 isn't a serpent ?

1 week ago
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Jeffery WilliamsSince the time of Jesus .

1 week ago   ·  1

1 Reply

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Les DuncanClever little bas$%&%$ them Vikings.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Alar PoderWe all know that here in north!😊

1 week ago   ·  1
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Eleonorah JönssonAll documented in King's Mirrror

1 week ago
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Karen MillerPreserving with salt is in the bible

1 week ago
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Brian Lovett WhiteLofoten Isles since time immemorial, Stock Fish... ???

1 week ago
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Carla SpencerWhy am I not 😳 surprised!?

1 week ago
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James RakusSounds fishy to me

1 week ago
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Norfolk Wolf ToddLol and.

1 week ago
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Douglas BrownSiegrun Maas

1 week ago   ·  1
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Santa Maria de Ochuse, a Spanish settlement near current-day Pensacola Florida was inhabited by as many as 1,500 colonists between 1559 and 1561 before a hurricane decimated their supplies, and was actually larger at its founding than St. Augustine.

archaeology.org/news/5791-170807-florida-luna-settlement

(UWF Archaeology)
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Santa Maria de Ochuse, a Spanish settlement near current-day Pensacola Florida was inhabited by as many as 1,500 colonists between 1559 and 1561 before a hurricane decimated their supplies, and was actually larger at its founding than St. Augustine. 

archaeology.org/news/5791-170807-florida-luna-settlement

(UWF Archaeology)

Beth Jones, Michael A Roland and 23 others like this

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Pancho GonzalezThe Spanish presence in what is now the US predates ANY English colonists (or English speakers)...

1 week ago   ·  13

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Leroy WebbThe further south down the American East Coast you go, the tougher it becomes fighting the environment-- makes it tough to dig, destroys remains of all kinds but especially organics like baskets-- south Florida is the worst I can think of except maybe the Bayous--

1 week ago
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Jim McGuireI hate to keep correcting people but decimate has a very specific meaning in the dictionary and that is; "to reduce by one tenth". Please stop using this word incorrectly.

6 days ago
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Nina Woody MorwaySheila Berg Underwood Gary, has David worked there?

1 week ago

3 Replies

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Rich GonyeauNever knew that. Thanks for sharing this.

1 week ago
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Joe ScarolaThat's awesome

1 week ago
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Ryan WallaceMichelle Pigott

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Michaele Morrissey PriestSheryl Morrissey Jerry Morrissey

1 week ago
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Rick DregerAndy Loero

1 week ago
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#ICYMI The mummified remains of a woman who lived 800 years ago, died at around 35 years old, and stood about five feet tall, have been discovered at the edge of the Siberian Arctic.

archaeology.org/news/5787-170804-russia-woman-mummy

(Institute of the Problems of Northern Development, SB RAS)
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#ICYMI The mummified remains of a woman who lived 800 years ago, died at around 35 years old, and stood about five feet tall, have been discovered at the edge of the Siberian Arctic. 

archaeology.org/news/5787-170804-russia-woman-mummy

(Institute of the Problems of Northern Development, SB RAS)

Beth Jones, Carol Gazda and 23 others like this

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Charles LockeCareful handling required! Dangerous archaic pathogens may yet remain resting, awaiting more favorable conditions to reemerge with a vengeance.

1 day ago
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Rima Mehioher curse will get all those who mess with her ,,,because she wants to go to the other world,,

1 week ago   ·  7

1 Reply

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Rollo F IngramSo, why do people disturb the dead?

1 week ago   ·  2

5 Replies

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Mary EdgecombAs the tundra thaws we will find more of these folks and the animals they hunted.

1 week ago   ·  5
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Kile D MorganNo, this isn't the afterworld, mummy. Sorry.

1 week ago
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Thomas BowersKelsie Simons you after a minute without attention 😉

1 week ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Lisa D ShrakeEternal beauty .

1 week ago   ·  2
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Helen DeanBeautiful face

1 week ago   ·  1
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Darlene WilliamsThese articles are very interesting thank you.

1 week ago
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Jason DesjardinsSelfie!

1 week ago
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Abou NajShe looks tiny

3 days ago
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Karen RhyshekCute

1 week ago
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Lina VanessaHiram Cardona

1 week ago   ·  1
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Zoe RawskiMichael

1 week ago   ·  1
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The Third-Dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Sa-Nakht, who stood well over six feet when men averaged around five and a half feet tall, could have suffered from gigantism, according to new evidence.

archaeology.org/news/5790-170807-egypt-giant-pharaoh

(Charles S. Myers, Public Domain)
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The Third-Dynasty Egyptian pharaoh Sa-Nakht, who stood well over six feet when men averaged around five and a half feet tall, could have suffered from gigantism, according to new evidence. 

archaeology.org/news/5790-170807-egypt-giant-pharaoh

(Charles S. Myers, Public Domain)

Beth Jones, Carol Gazda and 23 others like this

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William Lamontfrom what ive read, seen in archeological digs, and come to understand the complete history we have been taught is a mystery history not true historical facts. my point being six foot isnt a giant, thats like saying that all nba players are "giants" yes they are taller than the masses, however; the truth is not going to slap anyone in the face until you look outside whats being presented.

1 week ago   ·  8

5 Replies

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Adyghe Tamar ChabadiHe does not seem so tall because we are accustomed to seeing 6 feet tall and above men in the modern era. For his time period...he was huge.

1 week ago   ·  17
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Bruce LaneThere were tall guys in many time periods, who stood out, but unless I'm also prone to suffering from gigantism (for being over six feet tall) then I'm not buying it. An elite member of society that ate well would have a better chance of not having their growth stunted by being periodically starved, as well as likely having more protein in their diet.

1 week ago   ·  2

1 Reply

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Kat DavisHere's a link to the original Lancet publication with data tables in appendices if anyone is interested. Sadly it seems noone knows where the rest of remains are for further study. www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(17)30171-7/fulltext

1 week ago   ·  1
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Craig McDonaldWhere is the evidence that that corpse belonged to Sa-Nakht? Was it adorned with a cartouche that named him? The little I read gave zero evidence of confirmation of his identity.

1 week ago
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Virginia Doris MairI read that Egyptians ate shrimp, flax bread full of omega 3 fatty acids and garlic and onions. Their diet may have contributed to their amazing advancement in aesthetics, architecture and even beautiful notions of immortality and balance. Just wondering.

1 week ago
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Linda SmithIt has been well documented in the Bible as well as in every culture pre-flood that Giants lived on this earth as well as what today people refer to as "mythological creatures" created by the supernatural beings that fell to earth and encouraged mankind to turn away from God. Hence, God wiped them off the face of the earth, but they once did exist, and the bones of said giants are being uncovered from every corner of the world.

6 days ago
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JA LopezThe article says "could have" so its just a long shot speculation.....While someone this tall is uncommon in during this point in history it is not impossible.

1 week ago
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Mary EdgecombMost likely. Not acromegaly so he was always taller than his contemporaries. I'd love to get a good analytical look at this guy...

1 week ago
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Linda MalouinGigantisme at 6 feet .... hmmm perhaps it's because we see more hight, could it be someone who came from another place?

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Katerina KaranikasMaddie Mondon Evan Lianos never heard of this guy but i bet he was wun wun

1 week ago   ·  2

2 Replies

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Kevin ArmstrongDo he was a big guy , not everything is a pathology .

1 week ago

2 Replies

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Nancy D. Turpinperhaps "Marfan Syndrome"?? pronounced "square jaw" and tall with larger hands,etc.....

1 week ago   ·  1
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Michele E. LupePut some flesh on those bones, I want to see what he looked like. Often one can see the disease on the face.

1 week ago
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Tracy RunyanThe tallest man on Earth topped out at four inches shy of nine feet.

1 week ago
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Clayton AdamsOr he could have just been 6 feet tall...

1 week ago

1 Reply

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Sandor FeherRamesses II was 6'. subtorpical Africans can naturally grow, 6 and up.

1 week ago
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Zoi KoufalexiAnd he's got that gorgeous Hapsburg jaw 😂

1 week ago   ·  2
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Alexandru Gabriel SalaHow much is that in normal measurement units?

1 week ago   ·  2
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Sherry Whittenberg SmithI wonder what his haplogroup is.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Ella BrennanThat gonial angle is amazing

1 week ago   ·  1
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Sandie Moore SemerdjianPerhaps because of inner marriage.

1 week ago
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Dan TomaPlus, his Nikes were HUGE

1 week ago
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William Lamont

1 week ago
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CathyAnn DeeThats how my head feels right know...

1 week ago
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A new study, which suggests that indigenous North American farmers only succeeded in adapting maize to higher elevations thousands of years after first domesticating the plant, also evidences corn's remarkable standing variation.

archaeology.org/news/5789-170807-high-altitude-corn

(Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology)
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A new study, which suggests that indigenous North American farmers only succeeded in adapting maize to higher elevations thousands of years after first domesticating the plant, also evidences corns remarkable standing variation. 

archaeology.org/news/5789-170807-high-altitude-corn 

(Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology)

Beth Jones, Edward Allen Jr and 23 others like this

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Jeff EnloeI never thought about the history of corn other than it is an American plant. I plant a very hardy super sweet hybrid white corn 6 to 8 times every year in my garden. Thanks to evolution and science, we have corn from June to October in wet or dry years.

1 week ago   ·  1

4 Replies

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Thomas VanhookThe transition from a grass like plant to a plant with grain on a cob may have occurred naturally, but selecting the best seeds and replanting them took thousands of years to get a real productive plant.

1 week ago   ·  2
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Luis BlanchardThe really masters of maize....were the Inkas....Visit the Valle Sagrado...and you will know why....

1 week ago   ·  1
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Jeff EnloeThe corn I plant is a hybrid ("how sweet it is" from RH Schumway Seed Company) but not genetically modified.

1 week ago   ·  1
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Emilio OilimeOur corn isn't producing big ears of corn! I think the soil isn't right but it's sweet and tasty asf

1 week ago
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Gretchen RobinsonI recall hearing that there were perennial versions of corn in the wild. Any news on that?

1 week ago
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Dustin DanielsonHaha tell me that corn don't remind you of pepe' the king prawn from the muppets.

1 week ago
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Barbara LathamWasn't maize growing at fairly high altitudes in So. America pre-Columbus? Why wouldn't it transfer to No. America?

1 week ago
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Heliane GritschClaire Mai James

1 week ago   ·  1

4 Replies

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Nitham Ahmadthousands of years . what about the climate in that period ? what about the soil. now we in 2016 some of plants needs plastic houses and good fertilizers. ? so which study?

1 week ago
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William LynchThen . . . . . along comes Monsanto and the original creation has never been the same.

1 week ago
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Nitham Ahmada new study of whom?

1 week ago

1 Reply

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David YeagerPlants that grows hair,nice color😂👌

1 week ago
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Lida Del MonteMaisbloemen🌟🌟🌟

1 week ago
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Curt SuitThomas Vanhook, Jeff Enloe

1 week ago
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Ancient Hidden History added 37 new photos to the album: Ħaġar Qim & Mnajdra Temples, Malta — at Ħaġar Qim & Mnajdra Temples World Heritage Site. ... See MoreSee Less

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Ancient Hidden History shared Ancient Explorers's Ancient Explorers : Expedition Unknown - Dwarka.

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Hey Ancient Explorers! (a short message from our founder) "WOW! It's finally here. 😃 About 15 years ago, I began a journey to investigate the long lost city and civilization of Dwarka, India...where it is said that millions of people lived in a highly advanced kingdom thousands of years ago. There are ancient references of an abundant civilization ruled by gods...with gold palaces, temples ...

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LIKE / SHARE / SUBSCRIBE For more information visit - www.ancienthiddenhistory.blogspot.com Follow us on Facebook - www.facebook.com/ancienthiddenhis...

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Pushker Nath DharAmazing.

3 months ago   ·  1
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Ancient Hidden History shared Earth Ancients's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

360° Viewing at Giza. Christopher Dunn: Lost Technology of Ancient Egypt pt.1➡goo.gl/ouZqqX ... pt.2➡goo.gl/GyfGYk 🌎Explore our site: EarthAncients.com Selection of articles and Interviews➡earthancients.com/?s=Giza 👉Join our group: goo.gl/CCl3Ar The Great Pyramid beyond Khafre's Funerary Temple. Spin the image to the left and Khafre's monumental Pyramid towers above you Image Credit:...

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