Non-Dual Advaita Vedanta

This is the collected posts from various advaita vedanta FB groups. Enjoy the inspirations below.

John Wassenberg shared The Nisargadatta Gita's post to the group: Advaita. ... See MoreSee Less

A teaching ...

A teaching ... ... See MoreSee Less

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Antonio Cinque'Identification' with 'the particular' makes it 'matter', ... Otherwise, it is all just a passing show. But what happens when The Witness, steadily Observes only ITSELF?

2 days ago   ·  1
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Nedret Kilicit is already observing on quantum level,otherwise all probability waves would stay as wave and no beingness could exist.

2 days ago   ·  1
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Antonio CinqueThe Witness of quantum probabilities, is still caught in the 'subject-object nexus', ... But what happens when The Witness only Witnesses ITSelf, in the abscence of any phenomena? If the 'I AM' (Beingness) depends of quantum probabilities to Know that IT IS, what is 'prior', and needs no phenomena to Know ITSELF?

2 days ago   ·  1
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Nedret Kilicquantum level is also Self.All is Self..What is prior to consciousness can not be discussed because all attempts are mind oriented.

2 days ago   ·  1
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Antonio CinqueBeyond all Quantum phenomena is The Self. ... IT can be discussed, but the discussion is Not The Actuality. Here (in discussion), the mind is only used to 'point' beyond itself. 'Consciousness' is said to be the 'I Am' + phenomena (Nisargadatta). Consciousness with No phenomena, is only Pure, Objectless Awareness, which cannot be 'objectified', because it is Non-Phenomenal and Non-Dual.

2 days ago   ·  1
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Nedret KilicHe states” no “one” benefits from enlightenment ,pursue it if you like or live as if you are already enlightened”..I really take this sentence as Shruti.

2 days ago   ·  1
Nedret Kilic

Antonio Cinque'Enlightenment' means the terminal end of the concept of being a separate self, wherein 'personal benefits' are no longer possible. ... Only Choiceless Spontaneity, and Selfless Living is left over. Consequently, it is really not a matter of rejection or acceptance, because IT is non-conceptual, and non-volitional. The 'Seeing of Seeing' - ONLY, is Non-Dual and Non-Phenomenal, Wherein, Selfless Spontaneity Rules.

2 days ago   ·  1
Antonio Cinque

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Nedret Kilic shared Dm Adi's post to the group: Advaita. ... See MoreSee Less

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Manoj Sethi🙏

2 days ago
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Udita OterholmLove this. Really have to confront the ego here. ♥️🙏🏻♥️

2 days ago
Udita Oterholm

Jagannath Melanta>3

2 days ago
Jagannath Melanta

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How difficult is it to recognize the wetness in mud as water? It is obvious. Is any training or practice required?
Conscious Presence is also this obvious. It is That which knows everyone but is not known by anyone. You set out to find It but the seen gets in the way.
It is so close that there is no room for a ‘way’ to It.
It is the light behind all states. It is for all and is ever there. But if the eyes remain closed, the light goes unseen. The eyes remain closed because you enjoy dreaming so much.

Sri Roy Melvyn

How difficult is it to recognize the wetness in mud as water? It is obvious. Is any training or practice required?
Conscious Presence is also this obvious. It is That which knows everyone but is not known by anyone. You set out to find It but the seen gets in the way.
It is so close that there is no room for a ‘way’ to It.
It is the light behind all states. It is for all and is ever there. But if the eyes remain closed, the light goes unseen. The eyes remain closed because you enjoy dreaming so much.

Sri Roy Melvyn
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Mangal Dubey, Ishita Banerjee and 9 others like this

Manoj Sethi🙏

2 days ago
Manoj Sethi

Jagannath Melanta>3

1 day ago
Jagannath Melanta

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Mangal Dubey, Jagannath Melanta and 6 others like this

Manoj Sethi🙏

2 days ago
Manoj Sethi

Jagannath Melanta>3

1 day ago
Jagannath Melanta

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Nedret Kilic shared a link to the group: Advaita.

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"Do you know your self?" "No" "Until you do, you shut your mouth."

RESET

The self or ego is the default viewpoint in humans from around the age of 2. 

Like dye is to white cloth, this view based on an assumed protagonist, colors everything. 

In your universe, the self is the ‘sun’ that all else revolves around.

What is referred to as enlightenment or realization is the spontaneous resetting of the default viewpoint to Impersonal.

Sri Roy Melvyn

RESET

The self or ego is the default viewpoint in humans from around the age of 2.

Like dye is to white cloth, this view based on an assumed protagonist, colors everything.

In your universe, the self is the ‘sun’ that all else revolves around.

What is referred to as enlightenment or realization is the spontaneous resetting of the default viewpoint to Impersonal.

Sri Roy Melvyn
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Kaa aaR Harish, Prabhu Ram and 7 others like this

Jagannath Melanta❤ >3 Shree Roy?you really deserve Shree title Melvyn.

2 days ago   ·  1
Jagannath Melanta

Nedret KilicHe is a Jnani.

1 day ago
Nedret Kilic

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Nedret Kilic shared Marcus Bradley's post to the group: Advaita. ... See MoreSee Less

Thushara Damera shared Ramana Hridayam's post to the group: Advaita.

<3
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CONVERSATIONS WITH ANNAMALAI SWAMI Q: How effective is pradakshina of Arunachala? Is it as good as meditating on the Self? AS: Arunachala radiates the grace of the Self. If you walk around it with reverence, keeping your mind quiet or thinking of the Self, you are having satsang of the Self. Th...

Hari Lal, Krishan Yuvaraj and 15 others like this

Mridula Bhattप्रणाम

1 day ago
Mridula Bhatt

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You are awareness.
Awareness is another name for you.
Since you are awareness there is no need to attain or cultivate it.
_/\_
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Reinhard Jung shared Ramana Hridayam's post to the group: Advaita.

<3

Love for Truth is a prerequisite:

"Know that the wondrous jnana vichara is only for those who have attained purity of mind by softening and melting within."
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PRACTICE The unique ray that shines within the jiva as 'I' exists as the clue. If the jiva unflaggingly traces the source of that ray to the Heart, it will discover the Supreme and its bondage will cease. Know that the wondrous jnana vichara is only for those who have attained purity of mind by s...

N.MAHARAJ: V: Is it the Universal Consciousness or the individual consciousness that creates?
M:" These questions arise because of the conditioning of egoism. When you are in the ' I Amness' there is no egoism- it is completely liquidated. Consciousness appears, is seen, and then again is gone. It is like the air in the sky. The mistake happens because we consider ' That' Consciousness to be the individual consciousness. ' 'Consciousness' means Universal Consciousness. In deep sleep the individual consciousness or personality forgets itself, but the universal action still goes on. Whatever you meditate on or think about before going to sleep, that process continues. That is why importance is given to the recitation of a sacred mantra at the point of falling asleep - in order for that process to continue."
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Nedret Kilic, Celestineremo Nathan and 7 others like this

Jagannath Melanta>3

4 days ago
Jagannath Melanta

Manoj Sethi🙏

23 hours ago
Manoj Sethi

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John Wassenberg shared The Nisargadatta Gita's photo to the group: Advaita. ... See MoreSee Less

John Wassenberg shared The Nisargadatta Gita's post to the group: Advaita. ... See MoreSee Less

John Wassenberg shared The Nisargadatta Gita's post to the group: Advaita. ... See MoreSee Less

From ~~~ Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj - I Am That, Ch.58. Questioner: When asked about the means for self-realization, you invariably stress the importance of the mind dwelling on the sense ‘I am’. Where is the causal factor? Why should this particular thought result in self-realization? How d...

Nedret Kilic shared Ramana Maharshi's post to the group: Advaita. ... See MoreSee Less

From ~~~ Guru Ramana, P.II,Ch.XI. Q.: Bhagavan, whenever I meditate, I feel great heat in the head and, if I persist, my whole body burns. What is the remedy? M.: If concentration is made with the brain, sensations of heat and even headache ensue. Concentration has to be made in the heart, which ...

Rajiv Naik, Nita Dalal and 9 others like this

Jagannath Melanta❤ >3

14 hours ago
Jagannath Melanta

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Nedret Kilic shared Assem Shaar's post to the group: Advaita. ... See MoreSee Less

N.MAHARAJ: In Nisarga (nature) everything is time-bound (seasons, sowing, reaping, etc.), but nature itself is not time-bound. Nature is neither male nor female. Many Avatars come and go, but nature is not affected. The story of nature is emanating from all the impressions taken in your mind since birth. So long as you are holding on to these memories there will be no knowledge of the Self. If you just study whatever has happened in nature, like history, great lives, etc., you cannot realise your Self. You have to go within. Whatever great things have happened in nature, however powerful, still they disappear right here. These situations appear and disappear. This is actually abstract, what is solid here is the knowledge ' I Am.' The seen and the seeing disappear. I tell this only to those who are prepared to listen. Whatever appears is bound to disappear. The greatest appearance is the knowledge ' I Am'. It is invisible before the birth and after the death of the body, and while it is visible it is a solid thing. Many great sages have appeared and disappeared because of the powerful seed 'I Am'. when the prana leaves the body, knowledge has no support and it disappears, i.e., it is unseen.
What i am expounding is very deep. You may experience Brahma even, but that experience will not remain. All experiences are due to the cell 'I Am.' Both the cell and the experience will disappear. Even the best of your memories will vanish one day. The knowledge ' I Am' is time-bound, all your knowledge sprouts from the concept that you are."
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Edo Međurečan, Vish Atma and 2 others like this

Jagannath Melanta>3

12 hours ago
Jagannath Melanta

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Reinhard Jung shared Ramana Hridayam's post to the group: Advaita.

<3

Bhagavan's definition of nirvikalpa samadhi which was according to his own experience: "‘The mere non-perception of differences [vikalpas] outside is not the real nature of firm nirvikalpa. Know that the non-rising of differences in the dead mind alone is the true nirvikalpa.’ "
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CONVERSATIONS WITH ANNAMALAI SWAMI SAMADHI Bhagavan sometimes went into a trance-like Samadhi state while he was listening to the Tamil parayana [the daily chanting of scriptural works that took place in his presence]. I was told that this had happened quite frequently at Skandashram and in the ea...

Ajay Sharma, Narasimha Raju and 12 others like this

Manoj Sethi🙏

23 hours ago
Manoj Sethi

Bhaskaran Bhas Nair🙏

9 hours ago
Bhaskaran Bhas Nair

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Life is the functioning of consciousness through physical forms. 

There is no ‘my life’ as an individual life. This is merely the brain’s narrative. Entity status is only a convention that one human bestows on another.

Each and every phenomenon that the senses perceive and the brain interprets is an appearance in Consciousness, limited to the spatiotemporal dimension. 

In this sense, each of us are each other’s phenomena.

The body is not different from the objects around it insofar as it too is a set of sensations.

The one who asserts ownership of the body is quite different from the body that he calls his own. To whom does the body belong?

What does the body want? 

It doesn’t want anything. It needs to function in its natural manner. But if the body doesn’t want anything, what wants?

Likewise, because of the transient nature of things, the fear of dissolution is inevitable. It invites the inquiry ‘Whose fear is this?’ When this is resolved, there is no further need for God.

Sri Roy Melvyn

Life is the functioning of consciousness through physical forms.

There is no ‘my life’ as an individual life. This is merely the brain’s narrative. Entity status is only a convention that one human bestows on another.

Each and every phenomenon that the senses perceive and the brain interprets is an appearance in Consciousness, limited to the spatiotemporal dimension.

In this sense, each of us are each other’s phenomena.

The body is not different from the objects around it insofar as it too is a set of sensations.

The one who asserts ownership of the body is quite different from the body that he calls his own. To whom does the body belong?

What does the body want?

It doesn’t want anything. It needs to function in its natural manner. But if the body doesn’t want anything, what wants?

Likewise, because of the transient nature of things, the fear of dissolution is inevitable. It invites the inquiry ‘Whose fear is this?’ When this is resolved, there is no further need for God.

Sri Roy Melvyn
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Manoj Sethi🙏

1 day ago
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Rosa Munyiha❤❤❤

23 hours ago
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Kaa aaR HarishGrateful

8 hours ago
Kaa aaR Harish

Alexis DuPreSo much there, but I need to focus on what the body needs as I have been able to surmise from reading and experience. - it exists as a vehicle. It is made of expressed energy. Atoms and molecules arranged in to vessels that work to create, maintain the body and make it operable. So it has life force energy that is within each cell and each cell is directed towards a job. Our souls are inhabiting this body - we all are of the ultimate I AM or Brahma or the Source as are our cells and everything else manifested in this existence. We have incarnated into this body for whatever reasons into this position of being in control of this vehicle. Our primary role for the body is to feed and protect it. After that we are on our time. It can operate with out us as long as there is enough energy available ( air and food ). It is a symbiotic relationship. Of course all we see and feel physically what is provided by our body, what it is designed to translate from external stimulation. As we know from science all matter is energy vibrating. Remove all motion/heat and all becomes one. Our job as souls is to see past this expressed energy life and escape this trap and rejoin true consciousness. Or something to that effect! Om Shantih and Namaste

3 hours ago
Alexis DuPre

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Whatever you look deeply into may lead you to confront the Mystery that lies at the root of everything. - Wayne

Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman 
Madrid, Spain 
March 17-19th, 2017

See Calendar for Details http://www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1070

"Whatever you look deeply into may lead you to confront the Mystery that lies at the root of everything." - Wayne

Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman
Madrid, Spain
March 17-19th, 2017

See Calendar for Details www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1070
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Pradeep KaulAny way to access videos of Wayne's talk at this event? Also "Hot Seat Capers"? Thanks .... Pradeep Kaul

7 months ago   ·  1

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Pradeep Kaul

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UNDERSTANDING IS ALL

It is extremely difficult for any ordinary man to grasp the fact that nothing more than a deep understanding, an unshakable conviction, of ones true nature is all that is necessary for the transformation to take place. It has been mans conditioning from the earliest day of his life that it is only personal effort that can bring him anything in life:  even as a baby he had to cry before his hunger was satisfied.  And now he is told that understanding is all that is necessary and, what is more, that any effort by a me could well be counterproductive.  This seems incredible, quite unacceptable...

-Ramesh S. Balsekar, WHO CARES?!, p100
https://advaita.3dcartstores.com/WHO-CARES-by-Ramesh-S-Balsekar_p_66.html

advaita.org

UNDERSTANDING IS ALL

"It is extremely difficult for any ordinary man to grasp the fact that nothing more than a deep understanding, an unshakable conviction, of one's true nature is all that is necessary for the transformation to take place. It has been man's conditioning from the earliest day of his life that it is only personal effort that can bring him anything in life: even as a baby he had to cry before his hunger was satisfied. And now he is told that understanding is all that is necessary and, what is more, that any effort by a "me" could well be counterproductive. This seems incredible, quite unacceptable..."

-Ramesh S. Balsekar, WHO CARES?!, p100
advaita.3dcartstores.com/WHO-CARES-by-Ramesh-S-Balsekar_p_66.html

advaita.org
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David Lehman, Dee Blain and 23 others like this

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Isabel TaylorWOW!

6 months ago   ·  2
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Rion McCauleyMy dude.

6 months ago   ·  1
Rion McCauley

Wolfram SölterRight....and in case of a long behavior so difficult...but only quite a little shift...if understand...

6 months ago
Wolfram Sölter

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Advaita Wayne Ramesh posted in Advaita Fellowship — with Wayne Liquorman. ... See MoreSee Less

This Monday Night!  
Advaita Talks / Satsang with Wayne Liquorman
April 17, 2017 at 7:30pm
Hermosa Beach

See Calendar for Details- http://www.advaita.org/calendar.php

“In the most profound sense, when enlightenment happens, the whole notion of enlightenment becomes moot because there isn’t any one to know he’s enlightened.  There isn’t any actual thing as enlightenment, because the ultimate understanding is that every thing Is.  All is an incredible oneness made manifest in this life and living. That’s the understanding.”
- Wayne 

Live webcast available via website

advaita.org

This Monday Night!
Advaita Talks / Satsang with Wayne Liquorman
April 17, 2017 at 7:30pm
Hermosa Beach

See Calendar for Details- www.advaita.org/calendar.php

“In the most profound sense, when enlightenment happens, the whole notion of enlightenment becomes moot because there isn’t any one to know he’s enlightened. There isn’t any actual thing as enlightenment, because the ultimate understanding is that every thing Is. All is an incredible oneness made manifest in this life and living. That’s the understanding.”
- Wayne

Live webcast available via website

advaita.org
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Tonights Advaita Talk with Wayne Liquorman, April 17, has been CANCELLED. 

 Future dates will be posted here and on the Advaita Fellowship website -advaita.org.

Tonights Advaita Talk with Wayne Liquorman, April 17, has been CANCELLED.

Future dates will be posted here and on the Advaita Fellowship website -advaita.org.
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New Date!

Satsang / Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman 
Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 7:30pm
Hermosa Beach

see calendar for details - http://www.advaita.org/calendar.php

Live Webcast via advaita.org

“If you have heard something here, fine. If not, fine. If some change is to occur as a consequence, let it take place. If the understanding at any level has any value, any worth, it must naturally work its own way out. No “one” can do it. “   -Ramesh S. Balsekar

New Date!

Satsang / Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman
Thursday, April 20, 2017 at 7:30pm
Hermosa Beach

see calendar for details - www.advaita.org/calendar.php

Live Webcast via advaita.org

“If you have heard something here, fine. If not, fine. If some change is to occur as a consequence, let it take place. If the understanding at any level has any value, any worth, it must naturally work its own way out. No “one” can do it. “ -Ramesh S. Balsekar
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New Scheduled Advaita Talk! w / Wayne Liquorman 
Thursday Evening, April 27 at 7:30pm 
Hermosa Beach

See Calendar for Details - http://www.advaita.org/calendar.php

HOPE

The world is not an inherently dangerous place but it IS inherently changeable. Which is to say that security is fleeting. Security is the illusion that the comfort I have now won’t change. I am secure in my job means I won’t be fired. I am secure in my relationship means it is going to last forever. A deep part of us knows that such feelings are built on an insubstantial foundation. Our projections of the future are fantasies. We have been wrong before and we will likely be wrong again. Of course, we have been right a few times too…so there is always hope!”

~Wayne Liquorman 

< Live webcast  -  advaita.org >

Photo:  Wayne at home after a Talk/ Satsang

New Scheduled Advaita Talk! w / Wayne Liquorman
Thursday Evening, April 27 at 7:30pm
Hermosa Beach

See Calendar for Details - www.advaita.org/calendar.php

HOPE

"The world is not an inherently dangerous place but it IS inherently changeable. Which is to say that security is fleeting. Security is the illusion that the comfort I have now won’t change. I am secure in my job means I won’t be fired. I am secure in my relationship means it is going to last forever. A deep part of us knows that such feelings are built on an insubstantial foundation. Our projections of the future are fantasies. We have been wrong before and we will likely be wrong again. Of course, we have been right a few times too…so there is always hope!”

~Wayne Liquorman

< Live webcast - advaita.org >

Photo: Wayne at home after a Talk/ Satsang
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And then of course the following question is, How did you get there?  Ill follow your path.  Well, I was an alcoholic and a drug addict for nineteen years. That was my path.  -Wayne

Wayne is back at home in Los Angeles!  

Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman
THURSDAY, April 6 at 7:30pm 
HERMOSA BEACH

ALL ARE WELCOME

See Calendar for Details & April Satsang Schedule   http://www.advaita.org/calendar.php

And then of course the following question is, "How did you get there? I'll follow your path." Well, I was an alcoholic and a drug addict for nineteen years. That was my path. -Wayne

Wayne is back at home in Los Angeles!

Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman
THURSDAY, April 6 at 7:30pm
HERMOSA BEACH

ALL ARE WELCOME

See Calendar for Details & April Satsang Schedule www.advaita.org/calendar.php
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David De Meyer, Karam Roberto De Rinaldis and 17 others like this

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Bobby DeVitoIt's not a path I recommend, but I share that one with you, Wayne....

7 months ago
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Mark HuntonThat's stops them dead in their tracks, every time!

6 months ago
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Mark Hunton

Attachment6 months ago
Mark Hunton

David RiversAn Angel once asked of God Why did you create the universe? God replied I like to move it, move it

5 months ago
David Rivers

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Retreat with Wayne Liquorman 
Ibiza, Spain - Retreat 
June 24-30th, 2017

See Calendar for Event Detail - http://www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1073

Retreat with Wayne Liquorman
Ibiza, Spain - Retreat
June 24-30th, 2017

See Calendar for Event Detail - www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1073
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MESSAGE FROM WAYNE
 

Hello my loves,

I am the wind that roars through the forest. I am the dream. I am the ten thousand songs. I am the cancer that destroys its host. I am all that is beautiful. I am all that is unspeakable. I am salvation. I am destiny. I am the ache. I am the jewel in Indras net. I am the One. I am the many.

Look into my eyes. Look deeper still. Here is the vast emptiness that you seek. Bribe me. Seduce me. Pull out your best trick...you know the one...its always worked for you before.

Do you recognize me yet? I am hope. I am delusion. I am the liver that fails. I am the smile that draws you in. I am the relentless truth that frightens you away.

Are you beginning to realize that nothing will come of you here? Good, you are finally catching on.

Now go away
And welcome to Love.

Wayne

- from the NEW! February 2017 ADVAITA FELLOWSHIP NEWSLETTER  -  http://www.advaita.org/newslettertemplate/news1116.html

advaita.org

MESSAGE FROM WAYNE


Hello my loves,

I am the wind that roars through the forest. I am the dream. I am the ten thousand songs. I am the cancer that destroys its host. I am all that is beautiful. I am all that is unspeakable. I am salvation. I am destiny. I am the ache. I am the jewel in Indra's net. I am the One. I am the many.

Look into my eyes. Look deeper still. Here is the vast emptiness that you seek. Bribe me. Seduce me. Pull out your best trick...you know the one...it's always worked for you before.

Do you recognize me yet? I am hope. I am delusion. I am the liver that fails. I am the smile that draws you in. I am the relentless truth that frightens you away.

Are you beginning to realize that nothing will come of you here? Good, you are finally catching on.

Now go away
And welcome to Love.

Wayne

- from the NEW! February 2017 ADVAITA FELLOWSHIP NEWSLETTER - www.advaita.org/newslettertemplate/news1116.html

advaita.org
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David Lehman, Liliia Kuznietsova and 12 others like this

Vaishnav RameshYou is l or I is you

8 months ago
Vaishnav Ramesh

Nelly GiribaldiYou made me cry Wayne, as the first time I saw you!

5 months ago
Nelly Giribaldi

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RAMESH BALSEKAR - Happy Birthday!  100 years of Ramesh!   May 25, 1917 - September 27, 2009

LETTER TO GOD

This is Ramesh’s letter to God, which was published in the book ‘The Ultimate Understanding’ (Publishers: Yogi Impressions).

 

Dear God,

This is my record of eternal gratitude to You.

You gave me birth in a most respected Hindu family, but not high enough in social status to make me proud.

You gave me a physical form well-admired for its perfection, but it was small enough to keep me humble.

You gave me education high enough to be most useful in life, but not high enough to make me proud.

You gave me success in sports high enough to be satisfied, but not proud.

You gave me a career in which You took me high enough to be admired, but not high enough to make me arrogant.

You gave me a wife and family for which I have always been eternally grateful, but You did not spare me some grief to remind me not to forget what life is all about, and to be always grateful for what I do have.

You did not forget to place an adequate number of temptations in my way so that I may not be too critical of others who have to face their own temptations.

I am now 84, and perhaps the only wish that remains is that the long life You have given me will not carry a burden at the end. But in that case, I know You will also give me the necessary courage to go with it.

You gave me a lot to show me how little is needed to be content and how much could be given away.

And, undoubtedly, the most important of all - as if the bounty You have showered on me were not enough - You crowned Your achievement by using this psychosomatic apparatus to convey to the world the most important message of Advaita. Truly I am blessed. Or, indeed, my Beloved, have You not blessed Yourself?!

Finally, it occurs to me, if You were to design for Yourself a life in phenomenality, could it have been much different from this one?

And, for this thought, no tears are enough to wash Your Noumenal feet.

 advaita.org

RAMESH BALSEKAR - Happy Birthday! 100 years of Ramesh! May 25, 1917 - September 27, 2009

LETTER TO GOD

This is Ramesh’s letter to God, which was published in the book ‘The Ultimate Understanding’ (Publishers: Yogi Impressions).



Dear God,

This is my record of eternal gratitude to You.

You gave me birth in a most respected Hindu family, but not high enough in social status to make me proud.

You gave me a physical form well-admired for its perfection, but it was small enough to keep me humble.

You gave me education high enough to be most useful in life, but not high enough to make me proud.

You gave me success in sports high enough to be satisfied, but not proud.

You gave me a career in which You took me high enough to be admired, but not high enough to make me arrogant.

You gave me a wife and family for which I have always been eternally grateful, but You did not spare me some grief to remind me not to forget what life is all about, and to be always grateful for what I do have.

You did not forget to place an adequate number of temptations in my way so that I may not be too critical of others who have to face their own temptations.

I am now 84, and perhaps the only wish that remains is that the long life You have given me will not carry a burden at the end. But in that case, I know You will also give me the necessary courage to go with it.

You gave me a lot to show me how little is needed to be content and how much could be given away.

And, undoubtedly, the most important of all - as if the bounty You have showered on me were not enough - You crowned Your achievement by using this psychosomatic apparatus to convey to the world the most important message of Advaita. Truly I am blessed. Or, indeed, my Beloved, have You not blessed Yourself?!

Finally, it occurs to me, if You were to design for Yourself a life in phenomenality, could it have been much different from this one?

And, for this thought, no tears are enough to wash Your Noumenal feet.

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Suzanne Stolzberg, Jason Alexander Harris and 23 others like this

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Nelly GiribaldiThe first time I read this letter I couldn't stop crying ... and I still get emotional! What a beautiful manifestation of love and humbleness! I can't believe almost eight years went by!

5 months ago   ·  1
Avatar

Jason Alexander HarrisBeautiful

5 months ago
Jason Alexander Harris

Werner Müller-SpäthLetter to God: pure Advaita!

5 months ago
Werner Müller-Späth

Comment on Facebook

Retreat with Wayne Liquorman 
Ibiza, Spain 
June 24-30th, 2017
Details - http://www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1073

Retreat with Wayne Liquorman
Ibiza, Spain
June 24-30th, 2017
Details - www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1073
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Anywhere your attention moves there is something to be discovered.  You need only lift your gaze from the demands of your self to realize the miracle that is life and living.
                                          - Wayne Liquorman 

 *    *     *
Next Weekend in France!

Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman 
Lyon, France 
June 16-18th, 2017

Event Detail- http://www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1081

"Anywhere your attention moves there is something to be discovered. You need only lift your gaze from the demands of your 'self' to realize the miracle that is life and living."
- Wayne Liquorman

* * *
Next Weekend in France!

Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman
Lyon, France
June 16-18th, 2017

Event Detail- www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1081
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Luzviminda Manlapaz, David Lehman and 16 others like this

Murti VinayagaThank you very much.

4 months ago
Murti Vinayaga

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“Everything that is collected during a lifetime is given up in the end, and we leave as we entered, unblemished by any thought.”   

 - Ramesh S. Balsekar

“Everything that is collected during a lifetime is given up in the end, and we leave as we entered, unblemished by any thought.”

- Ramesh S. Balsekar
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MESSAGE FROM WAYNE

 
Hello my loves,

The guru is the rocker of the boat.
He cuts through the complacency
And numbness
Repeated exposure to miracles
Inevitably brings.

Look here, he cries!
Right in front of you!
Wake up!
Open your eyes!
The great Miracle is everywhere,
Abiding in the ordinary.
You need only shift your gaze a fraction from your self
To uncover the Eternal.

With much love,

Wayne

From New!  ADVAITA FELLOWSHIP NEWSLETTER -June 2017 -  http://www.advaita.org/newslettertemplate/news0617.html

MESSAGE FROM WAYNE


Hello my loves,

The guru is the rocker of the boat.
He cuts through the complacency
And numbness
Repeated exposure to miracles
Inevitably brings.

Look here, he cries!
Right in front of you!
Wake up!
Open your eyes!
The great Miracle is everywhere,
Abiding in the ordinary.
You need only shift your gaze a fraction from your "self"
To uncover the Eternal.

With much love,

Wayne

From New! ADVAITA FELLOWSHIP NEWSLETTER -June 2017 - www.advaita.org/newslettertemplate/news0617.html
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Advaita Wayne Ramesh shared a link to the group: Advaita Fellowship.

Highlights Of Ramesh Balsekar Centenary Dvd-1.mp4
Beautiful video of "100 Years of Ramesh" birthday celebration in Mumbai, India, May 25, 2017
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drive.google.com

Nicolas Fuster, Murti Vinayaga and 6 others like this

Eilean LowVideo doesn't seem to be working.

4 months ago

1 Reply

Eilean Low

Nelly GiribaldiThank you Wayne, I enjoyed it very much

4 months ago
Nelly Giribaldi

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THE LIVING TEACHING

Wayne teaches ancient Advaita (non-duality) in a modern style that is uncompromisingly direct and intuitive. It is a teaching that connects you to BOTH your heart and mind. BOTH are essential for living. Come discover the wisdom of BOTH.

Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman 
Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
July 7-9th, 2017

Event Detail- http://www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1126

THE LIVING TEACHING

Wayne teaches ancient Advaita (non-duality) in a modern style that is uncompromisingly direct and intuitive. It is a teaching that connects you to BOTH your heart and mind. BOTH are essential for living. Come discover the wisdom of BOTH.

Advaita Talks with Wayne Liquorman
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
July 7-9th, 2017

Event Detail- www.advaita.org/calendarDetail.php?id=1126
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Bobby DeVito likes this

Bobby DeVitoNothing like being with Wayne. It is mind-opening

4 months ago
Bobby DeVito

Comment on Facebook

A LIVING GEM FROM RAMESH

Just BE. Close your eyes, relax the body, let the mind be vacant, and you are in noumenal beingness, the fullness of nothingness. Such beingness is disturbed by an event that may occur like the breeze may cause a ripple on the surface of water. Then the world comes into existence and the event is witnessed together with the reaction, if any. The breeze stops, the ripple subsides in the water; the phenomenal event is over and you are back in the noumenal beingness. The world arises and subsides in your beingness. JUST BE. The me in you is irrelevant, illusory.

ADVIATA FELLOWSHIP NEWSLETTERS   -  August 2017. -
http://www.advaita.org/newslettertemplate/news0817.html

A LIVING GEM FROM RAMESH

Just BE. Close your eyes, relax the body, let the mind be vacant, and you are in noumenal beingness, the fullness of nothingness. Such beingness is disturbed by an event that may occur like the breeze may cause a ripple on the surface of water. Then the world comes into existence and the event is witnessed together with the reaction, if any. The breeze stops, the ripple subsides in the water; the phenomenal event is over and you are back in the noumenal beingness. The world arises and subsides in your beingness. JUST BE. The "me" in you is irrelevant, illusory.

ADVIATA FELLOWSHIP NEWSLETTERS - August 2017. -
www.advaita.org/newslettertemplate/news0817.html
... See MoreSee Less

Renate Ahluwalia shared Gems of Wisdom - Buddhist Masters of Ancient India's photo to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

<3
RESOLUTELY TRAIN YOUR MIND TO ATTAIN PEACE ~ BUDDHA
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Resolutely train yourself ~ Buddha justdharma.com/s/g8zcu Resolutely train yourself to attain peace. – Buddha Sutta Nipata source: www.realbuddhaquotes.com/resolutely-train-yourself-to-attain-peace/

<3
"When the mind is left without anything to cling to, it becomes still."
-Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi
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Renate Ahluwalia shared The Power of Buddhas's post to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

<3
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<3
One who knows the spiritual (self) knows the external (world) too. He who knows the external world, knows the self also.

- Lord Mahavir
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<3
"Those who have realized the Self, which is the ground of fate and free will, are free from them."
- Bhagavan Sri Ramana Maharshi
... See MoreSee Less

WHO AM I ?:
THE METAPHORS OF BODY AND SELF IN RAMANAS POETRY
Kiran Sikka, (Corresponding Author)
Abstract:
WHO AM I ? is a question we rarely ask ourselves. Man has always been aware of ‘I’ as the body through various manifestations in the world. At the same time it is ‘I’ as the Self which opens the doors to the spiritual world. Maharshi Ramana, a Seer Poet born in South India in 1879, asked the question, sought the answer and related it through metaphors in his poetry.
The journey of ‘I’— the body to ‘I’ — the Self in the form of awareness as Brahman brings an eternal bliss devoid of misery. The Self thus realized is eternal, formless and ever free.
His spiritual journey related in his poetry through various metaphors forms the crux of his philosophy.
The present paper explains metaphors for body and the Self in Maharshi’s poetry.
The paper discusses metaphor primarily in Indian perspective; elucidates Maharshi Ramana’s idea of ‘I’ as body and the realized Self; and then investigates the expression of these ideas
in the form of metaphors in his poetry.
Maharshi successfully uses these metaphors to assert his philosophy, to affirm his doctrinal truths and to express the totality of human existence.
Keywords: Metaphor, Maharshi Ramana, metaphors of body, metaphors of self.

1. Introduction
The question and inquiry into realizing the ‘Self’ had begun quite early in civilization especially in India. The thinkers, philosophers and sages have suggested different ways for attainment of this realization. Each of them has explored his own path and shared his experiences with articulating attainable states of
consciousness. Consequently, the recommendations of these sages, thinkers, philosophers and scholars have come to the common man either orally or in print. Underlying all the philosophical concepts, Self- enquiry has come out to be the most prominent. To attain the awareness of Self, one may follow either the bhakti mᾱrga—the path of devotion or Jñāna mᾱrga--the path of knowledge. This brings eternal bliss and consciousness in one’s life.
M. Anantanarayana calls this realization the “destination of wisdom, bliss, awareness and light”(5).
Among many seekers of such truth, Maharshi Ramana’s name comes in the category of the saint-poets who were blessed with glimpses of pure Self-realization, which suffused and irradiated their whole life. His poetry is about the resplendent bliss of divine knowledge attained through self-enquiry.
Maharshi Ramana realized the ᾱtman i.e. the universal Self in this mortal body at the tender age of seventeen. How and why he undertook this quest can be investigated significantly by looking at his life-history with attention to the incidents which not only changed his life forever but also had a powerful impact on the future course of the events in his life.
Maharshi was born to an uncertified pleader Sundaram Ayyar and Alaggmal in Tiruchuzi about thirty miles from Madurai. His father died when he was twelve. He was brought up by his mother
and uncles. Intelligent but indifferent to his studies, he did not show any inclination towards spirituality during that period. Perhaps God had predestined his life for a different course
which not many people take. In 1895, he heard about Arunachala from an old couple and felt an inexplicable and indescribable ecstasy.
A silent call from the mountain made it a permanent abode for him which he never left till hecompleted the sojourn of his earthly life.
Another experience also transformed his life. While sitting on the first floor of his uncle’s house in July 1896, he had a feeling of impending death despite being perfectly healthy. The feeling raised many questions with reference to the dilemma of human life. If the body was dying, what made one realize the full force of his personality? The spirit was awake in the form of ‘I’ within him. The realization of Self as the deathless spirit transcending the body dawned on him.
David Godman describes this moment of revelation as “indivisible and universal consciousness” (1).
The incidents conceptualized in the form of two main metaphors of body and Self and are delineated in his poems.

2. Understanding Metaphor
Poetry aims to communicate what is otherwise incommunicable. The poet cries the truth of man and sings the thunderous silence of God. Poetryis the wind that sings and the silence that drinks in all waves of song, life and death (Osborne 3). Poetry achieves this communicative effect of conveying more than literal meaning with the help of rhetorical devices—one among them is metaphor. One of the mysteries of human language, metaphors have been in the language since the time men first learnt to talk. They have been in the human psyche, the human mind itself. The functioning of mind is such that it talks in metaphorical language even when it is not aware. Metaphors give creativity, imagination, enrichment and the special faculty to a poet which makes poetry different from other disciplines.

2.1. Metaphor: an Indian Perspective
Metaphor is a mode of language that creates a relation between thought and words, sentences and intended utterances. Indian school of thought realized this quite early in its literary history. The roots of metaphor go to antiquity in India. Bharata in his Nāṭyaśāstra first talked about alaṃkāra-s i.e. figures of speech as poetic embellishments in chapter XVII titled
“Verbal Representation and Prosody” (Rangacharya 137). Bharata recognized rūpaka as figure of sense which laid a foundation stone for further theoretical developments of Indian
literary tradition. In the early sixth century, Bhāmaha categorized figures of peech in śabdālaṃkāra (a literary embellishment bearing upon sound) and arthālāṃkāra, (a literary embellishment bearing upon sense).
Rūpaka belongs to the category of arthālamkāra-s which finds either complete or partial identification between upmᾱna, the thing compared andupmeya, the thing compared to.
Rūpaka can be samastavastuvishya where all the factors of upameya completely identify with their counterparts of upmᾱna and ekdeśavivartῑ wherein only some factors of upameyaare identified with upmᾱna (38-39).
Daṇḍin in seventh century referring to literary and literal meaning in Kᾱvyādarśa accepted that a poem derived beauty from hetorical devices. He defined rūpaka on the basis of
tirobhūtabhedᾱ (difference made to disappear) where distinction between upmᾱna and upmeya is made to disappear purposely, erroneously or because of poetic fancy.
Rūpaka is an alaṃkāra where similarity between two objects leads to a sense of identity (Belvalkar and Raddy 104). In the ninth century Vᾱmana in Kᾱvyᾱlaṃakᾱrasūtravṛtti laying stress on riti
defined poetry as composed of sound and sense beautified by guna-s and alaṃkᾱra-s (KASV.1.2.7). He recognized rūpaka as one of the thirty-three hetorical figures. Further,
Ᾱnandvardhana, in Dhavanyaloka expounded dhvani theory which formulates another basis of metaphoric study of language.. “Kᾱvyasyᾱtmᾱdhvanih” (2), he says referring to suggestion as the soul of the poetry. Rᾱjaśekhara, in the tenth century, in his significant work Kᾱvyamῑmāṃsā, also refers to the intermingling of rasa (aesthetic charm), guṇa (quality) and alaṃkāra (rhetorical figures) for maturity of expression (Parashar 64).
Mammaṭa in Kᾱvyaprakᾱśa also talks about dhvani where suggested meaning dominates the expressed (Jha 6).
Thus Indian thinkers accept that there must be some relation between the primary and actual referent.

2.2. Metaphor: A Western Perspective In the West however, Aristotle recognized metaphor as a sign of genius and its intuitive perception of similarity in dissimilars (House 121). One can find similarity in Indian and Western point of view as comparison underlies both literary traditions whether it is a partial or complete identification between upmᾱna or upameya drawn by Bhᾱmah in Kᾱvyᾱlaṃkᾱra or when Richards proposes two very useful terms “tenor” and “vehicle” while talking about metaphors. The tenor is the idea conveyed or illuminated by the vehicle which is the actual figurative expression. (Johnson 52).

2.3. Metaphor: A Comparison of the Indian and Western Point of View: If the Western literary world recognizes metaphor as a problem of meaning, it is the East which discusses it in detail as lakṣanᾱ in case of unsuitability of context or in case of relation
between primary and actual referent. Compared to the West, Indian theory of metaphor is more comprehensive because it takes care of the context in which something is spoken, the
relation between primary and actual referent and the sanction of the transferred sense which popular usage gives it (Raja 232).
It is a composite whole when Bhatṛihari talks about sentence and not the word as indivisible unit of meaning which makes sense in a given situation. Bhartṛhari’s idea of preferring a sentence over word as ameaning unit gave a new shape to the theory of
metaphor.The extraordinary linguistic and philosophical acumen of great Indian thinkers like Bhatṛhari can be of valuable help to solve complicated issues in modern discussions on the subject, says Kunjunni Rana (5).
This brings us closer to recent modern western theories of metaphor when Max Black talks about permeable and elastic
conceptual boundaries where metaphorical thoughts and
utterances sometimes embody insights expressible in no other fashion (Black 3). George Lakoff and Mark Johnson find metaphors pervasive in our daily life (3).
Andrew Ortony in Metaphor and Thought talks about the two approaches to metaphor viz. the constructive; and the parasitic and deviant to language. He prefers the first approach as metaphors make use of the creativity of language. He considers metaphors a part of our thought processes (2). However the Indian theories of metaphors recognized the multiple expression of language in abhidᾱ, lakşaṇā and vyañjanā quite early in its literary history.
When abhidᾱor primary meaning is unsuitable in the given context, lakşaṇais resorted to.
Lakşaṇā is also important in all philosophical systems to discuss the nature of ultimate reality which is beyond expression. Metaphorical expressions help in extending the range of expression. (Raja 231-273)

References:
[1] M. Ananatanarayanan, Quintessence of Wisdom, (1997), Tiruvannamalai:
Sriramanasramam, Print.
[2] S.K. Belvalkar and R.B. Raddy, Daṇḍins Kavyadarsa, Parichcheda 2, (1920),
Bombay: Bombay Sanskrit and Prakrit Series No. LXXV,
[3] D. Godman, Be As You Are: The Teachings of Maharshi Ramana, (1989), Arkana:
Penguin Books, Print.

WHO AM I ?:
THE METAPHORS OF BODY AND SELF IN RAMANA'S POETRY
Kiran Sikka, (Corresponding Author)
Abstract:
WHO AM I ? is a question we rarely ask ourselves. Man has always been aware of ‘I’ as the body through various manifestations in the world. At the same time it is ‘I’ as the Self which opens the doors to the spiritual world. Maharshi Ramana, a Seer Poet born in South India in 1879, asked the question, sought the answer and related it through metaphors in his poetry.
The journey of ‘I’— the body to ‘I’ — the Self in the form of awareness as Brahman brings an eternal bliss devoid of misery. The Self thus realized is eternal, formless and ever free.
His spiritual journey related in his poetry through various metaphors forms the crux of his philosophy.
The present paper explains metaphors for body and the Self in Maharshi’s poetry.
The paper discusses metaphor primarily in Indian perspective; elucidates Maharshi Ramana’s idea of ‘I’ as body and the realized Self; and then investigates the expression of these ideas
in the form of metaphors in his poetry.
Maharshi successfully uses these metaphors to assert his philosophy, to affirm his doctrinal truths and to express the totality of human existence.
Keywords: Metaphor, Maharshi Ramana, metaphors of body, metaphors of self.

1. Introduction
The question and inquiry into realizing the ‘Self’ had begun quite early in civilization especially in India. The thinkers, philosophers and sages have suggested different ways for attainment of this realization. Each of them has explored his own path and shared his experiences with articulating attainable states of
consciousness. Consequently, the recommendations of these sages, thinkers, philosophers and scholars have come to the common man either orally or in print. Underlying all the philosophical concepts, Self- enquiry has come out to be the most prominent. To attain the awareness of Self, one may follow either the bhakti mᾱrga—the path of devotion or Jñāna mᾱrga--the path of knowledge. This brings eternal bliss and consciousness in one’s life.
M. Anantanarayana calls this realization the “destination of wisdom, bliss, awareness and light”(5).
Among many seekers of such truth, Maharshi Ramana’s name comes in the category of the saint-poets who were blessed with glimpses of pure Self-realization, which suffused and irradiated their whole life. His poetry is about the resplendent bliss of divine knowledge attained through self-enquiry.
Maharshi Ramana realized the ᾱtman i.e. the universal Self in this mortal body at the tender age of seventeen. How and why he undertook this quest can be investigated significantly by looking at his life-history with attention to the incidents which not only changed his life forever but also had a powerful impact on the future course of the events in his life.
Maharshi was born to an uncertified pleader Sundaram Ayyar and Alaggmal in Tiruchuzi about thirty miles from Madurai. His father died when he was twelve. He was brought up by his mother
and uncles. Intelligent but indifferent to his studies, he did not show any inclination towards spirituality during that period. Perhaps God had predestined his life for a different course
which not many people take. In 1895, he heard about Arunachala from an old couple and felt an inexplicable and indescribable ecstasy.
A silent call from the mountain made it a permanent abode for him which he never left till hecompleted the sojourn of his earthly life.
Another experience also transformed his life. While sitting on the first floor of his uncle’s house in July 1896, he had a feeling of impending death despite being perfectly healthy. The feeling raised many questions with reference to the dilemma of human life. If the body was dying, what made one realize the full force of his personality? The spirit was awake in the form of ‘I’ within him. The realization of Self as the deathless spirit transcending the body dawned on him.
David Godman describes this moment of revelation as “indivisible and universal consciousness” (1).
The incidents conceptualized in the form of two main metaphors of body and Self and are delineated in his poems.

2. Understanding Metaphor
Poetry aims to communicate what is otherwise incommunicable. The poet cries the truth of man and sings the thunderous silence of God. Poetryis the wind that sings and the silence that drinks in all waves of song, life and death (Osborne 3). Poetry achieves this communicative effect of conveying more than literal meaning with the help of rhetorical devices—one among them is metaphor. One of the mysteries of human language, metaphors have been in the language since the time men first learnt to talk. They have been in the human psyche, the human mind itself. The functioning of mind is such that it talks in metaphorical language even when it is not aware. Metaphors give creativity, imagination, enrichment and the special faculty to a poet which makes poetry different from other disciplines.

2.1. Metaphor: an Indian Perspective
Metaphor is a mode of language that creates a relation between thought and words, sentences and intended utterances. Indian school of thought realized this quite early in its literary history. The roots of metaphor go to antiquity in India. Bharata in his Nāṭyaśāstra first talked about alaṃkāra-s i.e. figures of speech as poetic embellishments in chapter XVII titled
“Verbal Representation and Prosody” (Rangacharya 137). Bharata recognized rūpaka as figure of sense which laid a foundation stone for further theoretical developments of Indian
literary tradition. In the early sixth century, Bhāmaha categorized figures of peech in śabdālaṃkāra (a literary embellishment bearing upon sound) and arthālāṃkāra, (a literary embellishment bearing upon sense).
Rūpaka belongs to the category of arthālamkāra-s which finds either complete or partial identification between upmᾱna, the thing compared andupmeya, the thing compared to.
Rūpaka can be samastavastuvishya where all the factors of upameya completely identify with their counterparts of upmᾱna and ekdeśavivartῑ wherein only some factors of upameyaare identified with upmᾱna (38-39).
Daṇḍin in seventh century referring to literary and literal meaning in Kᾱvyādarśa accepted that a poem derived beauty from hetorical devices. He defined rūpaka on the basis of
tirobhūtabhedᾱ (difference made to disappear) where distinction between upmᾱna and upmeya is made to disappear purposely, erroneously or because of poetic fancy.
Rūpaka is an alaṃkāra where similarity between two objects leads to a sense of identity (Belvalkar and Raddy 104). In the ninth century Vᾱmana in Kᾱvyᾱlaṃakᾱrasūtravṛtti laying stress on riti
defined poetry as composed of sound and sense beautified by guna-s and alaṃkᾱra-s (KASV.1.2.7). He recognized rūpaka as one of the thirty-three hetorical figures. Further,
Ᾱnandvardhana, in Dhavanyaloka expounded dhvani theory which formulates another basis of metaphoric study of language.. “Kᾱvyasyᾱtmᾱdhvanih” (2), he says referring to suggestion as the soul of the poetry. Rᾱjaśekhara, in the tenth century, in his significant work Kᾱvyamῑmāṃsā, also refers to the intermingling of rasa (aesthetic charm), guṇa (quality) and alaṃkāra (rhetorical figures) for maturity of expression (Parashar 64).
Mammaṭa in Kᾱvyaprakᾱśa also talks about dhvani where suggested meaning dominates the expressed (Jha 6).
Thus Indian thinkers accept that there must be some relation between the primary and actual referent.

2.2. Metaphor: A Western Perspective In the West however, Aristotle recognized metaphor as a sign of genius and its intuitive perception of similarity in dissimilars (House 121). One can find similarity in Indian and Western point of view as comparison underlies both literary traditions whether it is a partial or complete identification between upmᾱna or upameya drawn by Bhᾱmah in Kᾱvyᾱlaṃkᾱra or when Richards proposes two very useful terms “tenor” and “vehicle” while talking about metaphors. The tenor is the idea conveyed or illuminated by the vehicle which is the actual figurative expression. (Johnson 52).

2.3. Metaphor: A Comparison of the Indian and Western Point of View: If the Western literary world recognizes metaphor as a problem of meaning, it is the East which discusses it in detail as lakṣanᾱ in case of unsuitability of context or in case of relation
between primary and actual referent. Compared to the West, Indian theory of metaphor is more comprehensive because it takes care of the context in which something is spoken, the
relation between primary and actual referent and the sanction of the transferred sense which popular usage gives it (Raja 232).
It is a composite whole when Bhatṛihari talks about sentence and not the word as indivisible unit of meaning which makes sense in a given situation. Bhartṛhari’s idea of preferring a sentence over word as ameaning unit gave a new shape to the theory of
metaphor.The extraordinary linguistic and philosophical acumen of great Indian thinkers like Bhatṛhari can be of valuable help to solve complicated issues in modern discussions on the subject, says Kunjunni Rana (5).
This brings us closer to recent modern western theories of metaphor when Max Black talks about permeable and elastic
conceptual boundaries where metaphorical thoughts and
utterances sometimes embody insights expressible in no other fashion (Black 3). George Lakoff and Mark Johnson find metaphors pervasive in our daily life (3).
Andrew Ortony in Metaphor and Thought talks about the two approaches to metaphor viz. the constructive; and the parasitic and deviant to language. He prefers the first approach as metaphors make use of the creativity of language. He considers metaphors a part of our thought processes (2). However the Indian theories of metaphors recognized the multiple expression of language in abhidᾱ, lakşaṇā and vyañjanā quite early in its literary history.
When abhidᾱor primary meaning is unsuitable in the given context, lakşaṇais resorted to.
Lakşaṇā is also important in all philosophical systems to discuss the nature of ultimate reality which is beyond expression. Metaphorical expressions help in extending the range of expression. (Raja 231-273)

References:
[1] M. Ananatanarayanan, Quintessence of Wisdom, (1997), Tiruvannamalai:
Sriramanasramam, Print.
[2] S.K. Belvalkar and R.B. Raddy, Daṇḍin's Kavyadarsa, Parichcheda 2, (1920),
Bombay: Bombay Sanskrit and Prakrit Series No. LXXV,
[3] D. Godman, Be As You Are: The Teachings of Maharshi Ramana, (1989), Arkana:
Penguin Books, Print.
... See MoreSee Less

Francesco Paramananda Russo, Subhash Chandra Malik and 16 others like this

Inês Nemalusi...what to say? No words to express my ❤

2 years ago
Inês Nemalusi

Renate Ahluwalia<3

2 years ago
Renate Ahluwalia

Comment on Facebook

MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT ADVAITA 
By David Frawley
(First published in the Mountain Path of the Sri Ramanashram)

THE ALLURE OF THE DIREKT PATH
Advaita, which refers to the state of non-duality of the Self and God, can easily lend itself to all sorts of misconceptions. Indeed one can argue that since the Advaitic state transcends all thought and all dualities, all conceptions about it are ultimately misconceptions!

Advaitic practice is itself about the removal of misconceptions, particularly wrong ideas about our true nature, negating its false identification with the body and the external world. But misconceptions about the path also exist and can be significant obstacles to overcome along the way. Of course many of these same misconceptions can be found relative to any spiritual path, because all spiritual paths aim to take us to a higher state of consciousness, which can appeal to fantasy and escapism as well as to genuine aspiration. Yet as Advaita is the highest and most direct path this potential for distortion is even greater, like an ordinary climber’s fantasy to quickly scale the heights of Mount Everest.

Advaita is formless in nature and in practice, so there is much room for overestimating, if not exaggerating one’s attainments, and little objective to keep one grounded. Going all the way back to the Upanishads there are criticisms of practitioners who can brilliantly talk the Advaitic line but lack the realization to really back it up. Advaita, though referring to the Brahmic state beyond Maya, therefore, has its own glamour or Maya. The allure of a quick and direct path to becoming God and guru has a special appeal not only to the awakened soul but also to the unawakened ego that wants the glory of spiritual realization without undergoing any real toil or tapas in order to get there.

These usual misconceptions are getting further magnified as Advaita becomes popular in the West, which as a media dominated culture easily falls into stereotype, image production and fantasy-fulfillment. Just as Yoga has undergone many distortions in the West, which has reduced it largely to a physical asana practice, so too Advaita is often getting reduced to an instant enlightenment fad, to another system of personal empowerment or to another type of pop psychology.

An entire ‘neo-Advaitic’ movement has arisen reflecting not only traditional teachings but the demands of western culture. While this movement is arguably a good trend for the future and contains much that is positive in it, it is also a fertile ground for many distortions, which are likely to become more pronounced as the popular base of the movement expands.

The Advaitic path is rooted in a powerful and simple logic, which is not difficult to learn. “You are That”, “The Self is Everything”, “All is One”, and so on. We can easily confuse adapting this logic, which is not difficult, with the actual realization of the state of awareness behind it, which is something else altogether. We can answer all questions with “Who is asking the question?”, when it may be no more than a verbal exercise.

Faced with both old and new misconceptions, the Advaitic student today is in a difficult position to separate a genuine approach and real guidance from the bulk of superficial or misleading teachings, however well-worded, popular or pleasant in appearance these may appear to be.

Advaita and Vedanta

Advaita is primarily a term of Advaita Vedanta, the non-dualistic tradition of Vedanta. Though rooted in the Vedas, Upanishads and Gita, its most characteristic form occurs in the teachings of Shankaracharya (c. 500 AD), who put these Vedic teachings in a clear rational language that remains easily understandable to the present day. The basic language and logic of Shankara can be found behind most Advaitic teachings, even those who may not have studied Shankara directly. There are many specifically Advaitic texts from Shankara’s Upanishadic commentaries to more general works like Yoga Vasishta, Avadhuta Gita, Ashtavakra Samhita and Tripura Rahasya as part of an enormous literature, not only in Sanskrit but in all the dialects in India.

Similarly, there have been many great gurus in the tradition of Advaita Vedanta throughout the centuries. Most of the great gurus of modern India have been Advaitins including Vivekananda, Rama Tirtha, Shivananda, Chandrashekhar Saraswati of Kanchi, Ramana Maharshi and Anandamayi Ma. Most of the great gurus from India who brought Yoga to the West like Vivekananda, Yogananda, Satchitananda and Swami Rama, also taught Advaita Vedanta, if we really look at their teachings.

However, a recent trend has been to remove Advaita from Vedanta, as if it were a different or independent path, and not bring in the greater tradition of Vedanta. Though neo-Advaita usually bases itself on modern Advaita Vedantins like Ramana Maharshi or Nisargadatta, it usually leaves the Vedanta out of the term and neglects the teachings of other great modern Vedantins from Vivekananda to Dayananda, though their works are easily available in English and quite relevant to any Advaitic practice.

This ‘Advaita without Vedanta’ is particularly strange because many important ideas found in the neo-Advaita movement, like that a universal path of Self-knowledge, reflect the neo-Vedanta movement that was popular in the early twentieth century following the teachings of Ramakrishna and Vivekananda and have been echoed throughout the modern Vedanta movement.

Neo-Advaita and Ramana Maharshi

The teachings of Ramana Maharshi are often the starting point for neo-Advaitic teachers, though other influences also exist in the movement. However, instead of looking into the background and full scope of Ramana’s teachings, there is often only a focus only on those of his teachings that seem to promise quick realization for all.

Some neo-Advaitins even refer to Ramana’s teachings as if Ramana was a rebel or outside of any tradition, almost as if he invented Advaita himself. While Ramana based his teaching on his own direct realization, he frequently quoted from and recommended the reading of Advaitic texts, which he found represented the same teachings as those that arose from his own experience. This included not only the works of Shankara, the main traditional Advaitic teacher, but many other texts like Yoga Vasishta, Tripura Rahasya and Advaita Bodha Dipika.

Ramana did broaden out the traditional Advaitic path from its medieval monastic Hindu forms. Yet even in this regard he was continuing a reformation since Vivekananda who created a practical Vedanta or practical Advaita and taught it to all sincere seekers, not just to monastics.

Many students come to neo-Advaitic teachers because of Ramana’s influence, looking for another Ramana or for instruction into Ramana’s teaching, but apart from Ramana’s image used by the teacher, what they get may be something different. That someone may use the image of Ramana or quote from him, therefore, is no guarantee that their teaching is really the same.

Are There Prerequisites for Advaita?

One of the main areas of difference of opinion is relative to who can practice Advaita and to what degree? What are the prerequisites for Self-inquiry? Some people believe that Advaita has no prerequisites, but can be taken up by anyone, under any circumstances, regardless of their background or life-style. After all, Advaita is just teaching us to rest in our true nature, which is always there for everyone. Why should that rest on any outer aids or requirements? This is a particularly appealing idea in the age of democracy, when all people are supposed to be equal.

In much of neo-Advaita, the idea of prerequisites on the part of the student or the teacher is not discussed. Speaking to general audiences in the West, some neo-Advaitic teachers give the impression that one can practice Advaita along with an affluent life-style and little modification of one’s personal behavior. This is part of the trend of modern yogic teachings in the West that avoid any reference to asceticism or tapas as part of practice, which are not popular ideas in this materialistic age.

However, if we read traditional Advaitic texts, we get quite a different impression. The question of the aptitude or adhikara of the student is an important topic dealt with at the beginning of the teaching. The requirements can be quite stringent and daunting, if not downright discouraging. One should first renounce the world, practice brahmacharya, and gain proficiency in other yogas like Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga and Raja Yoga and so on (the sadhana-chatushtya). One can examine texts like the Vedanta Sara I.6-26 for a detailed description. While probably no one ever had all of these requirements before starting the practice of Self-inquiry, these at least do encourage humility, not only on the part of the student, but also on the part of the teacher who himself may not have all these requirements!

Ramana keeps the requirement for Advaita simple yet clear – a ripe mind, which is the essence of the whole thing, and encourages practice of the teaching without overestimating one’s readiness for it. Yet a ripe mind is not as easy as it sounds either.

Ramana defines this ripe mind as profound detachment and deep discrimination, above all a powerful aspiration for liberation from the body and the cycle of rebirth – not a mere mental interest but an unshakeable conviction going to the very root of our thoughts and feelings (note Ramana Gita VII. 8-11).

A ripe, pure or sattvic mind implies that rajas and tamas, the qualities of passion and ignorance, have been cleared not only from the mind but also from the body, to which the mind is connected in Vedic thought. Such a pure or ripe mind was rare even in classical India. In the modern world, in which our life-style and culture is dominated by rajas and tamas, it is indeed quite rare and certainly not to be expected.

To arrive at it, a dharmic life-style is necessary. This is similar to the Yoga Sutra prescription of the yamas and niyamas as prerequisites for Yoga practice. In this regard, Ramana particularly emphasized a sattvic vegetarian diet as a great aid to practice.

The problem is that many people take Ramana’s idea of a ripe mind superficially. It is not a prescription that anyone can approach or practice Advaita in any manner they like. Advaita does require considerable inner purity and self-discipline, developing which is an important aim of practice which should not be lightly set aside.

Is Advaita Against Other Yoga Practices?

A related misconception is that Advaita is against other spiritual and yogic practices like mantra, pranayama, puja and bhakti, which from its point of view are regarded as of little value and only serve to condition the mind further. Even a number of traditional Advaitic texts speak of setting all such other yogic practices aside as useless. Many neo-Advaitins emphasize such advanced teachings. They may tell even beginning students to give up all other practices and discourage them from doing mantras, pranayama or other yoga techniques. We could call this ‘Advaita without Yoga’.

Traditional Advaita, which Ramana echoed, states that advanced aspirants who are truly ready for a dedicated path of self-inquiry can discard other yogic practices if they are so inclined. But it also states that for gaining a ripe mind, developing proficiency in these preliminary practices is a good idea. Most people can benefit from at least some support practices, particularly beginners, even if their main focus is Self-inquiry. Note the Ramana Gita VII. 12-14 in this regard.

If we study traditional Advaita, we find that Yoga practices were regarded as the main tools for developing the ripe mind necessary for Advaita to really work. Many great Advaitins taught Yoga as well. Even Shankara taught Tantric Yoga in his teachings like Saundarya Lahiri and composed great devotional hymns to all the main Hindu Gods and Goddesses. This tradition of Yoga-Vedanta – using Yoga to create a ripe or sattvic mind, and using Advaita for the higher realization through it – has been the dominant approach in Vedanta found not only in the works of older gurus like Shankaracharya and Vidyaranaya, but in modern gurus like Vivekananda, Shivananda and Yogananda.

Ramana, though he emphasized Self-inquiry, never rejected the value of other yogic practices. He commonly extolled such practices as chanting the name of God, chanting Om and doing pranayama. He had regular Vedic chanting and pujas done at the ashram which continue today.

This traditional Advaitic view of different levels practice should not be confused with an approach that rejects all practices as useless. In this regard we can contrast traditional Advaita Vedanta, which Ramana followed, and the teachings of J. Krishnamurti, which is often the source of neo-Advaita’s rejection of support practices.

Advaitic aspirants may not be attracted to all such Yoga practices and need not be, but they should not therefore regard them as of no value or discourage others from doing them. Until the mind is fully ripe or sattvic, such practices have their value, though we should use them as a means to Self-inquiry, not in exclusion of it. Advaita without Yoga, like Advaita without Vedanta often leaves the student without the proper tools to aid them along their sometimes long and difficult path.

THE ADVAITIC GURU

Of course, the greatest possible distortions are relative to the Advaitic Guru. Since Advaita relies less on outer marks than other traditions, almost anyone can claim to be an Advaitic Guru, particularly once we have removed Advaita from any tradition of Vedanta or Yoga. In much of neo-Advaita, there is a rush to become gurus and give satsangs, even without much real study or practice. While certainly even a beginning student can teach the basics of Advaita for the benefit of others, to quickly set oneself up as a Self-realized guru raises a lot of questions. One can have an experience of the Self, while the full realization may yet be far away. Full Self-realization is neither easy nor common, under any circumstances.

Advaita does emphasize the advantage of instruction from a living Self-realized guru. Many people therefore think that they must have a living Self-realized guru or they can’t practice Self-inquiry. This is not the case either. If one has access to genuine teachings, like those of Ramana, and follows them with humility and self-discipline, one can progress far on the path, which will lead them to further teachers and teachings as needed. On the other hand, in the rush to get a living Self-realized guru, students may get misled by those who claim Self-realization but may not really have it. Such false gurus cannot lead students very far and may take them in a wrong direction altogether.

A related misconception is that Advaitic realization can only be gained as a direct transmission from a living teacher, as if Self-realization depended upon a physical proximity to one who has it. Practice may get reduced to hanging out around the so-called guru and waiting for his glance! The presence of a real sadhak does indeed aid one’s practice, but physical proximity to gurus is no substitute for one’s own inner practice. And physical proximity to those who don’t have true realization may not bring much of benefit at all.

If Self-realization were as easy as coming into physical proximity with the teacher, most of the thousands who visited Ramana would have already become Self-realized. If the teaching had to come from a living guru only, then no teachings would be preserved after the guru died as these would no longer be relevant. So the realization behind the guru and the depth of his teaching is more important than whether he is in a physical body or not. A great guru leaves teachings for many generations and his influence is not limited by the lifetime of his physical body. A lesser guru, on the other hand, does not have much real transformative influence even if we spend a lifetime around him.

In addition, true Advaitic gurus are not always easy to find, nor do they always make themselves prominent in the external world. Like Ramana, many great gurus are quiet, silent and withdrawn. We can best find them by karmic affinity from our own practice, not by external searching or running after personalities.

WHICH SELF IS BEING EXAMINATET?

Self-inquiry is an examination into our true nature, which is pure consciousness beyond body and mind. This is a very different process from psychological analysis, which is an inquiry into our personal, historical, ego-based individuality. Our true Self is our universal being, a consciousness present not only in humans but in animals, plants, the very Earth on which we live, the atmosphere, stars and planes of existence beyond the physical.

Another misconception in modern Advaita is turning Self-inquiry into an examination of the personal self, our fears and desires, and trying to make us feel better about it. Neo-Advaita in particular gets mixed up with western psychology and can get caught in examining the mind rather than going beyond the mind. Advaita is not about psychological happiness but about negating our psychology. Naturally some clarity about our psychology can be of initial help, but it is not the goal of practice.

FINDING ONES OWN PATH

MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT ADVAITA
By David Frawley
(First published in the Mountain Path of the Sri Ramanashram)

THE ALLURE OF THE DIREKT PATH
Advaita, which refers to the state of non-duality of the Self and God, can easily lend itself to all sorts of misconceptions. Indeed one can argue that since the Advaitic state transcends all thought and all dualities, all conceptions about it are ultimately misconceptions!

Advaitic practice is itself about the removal of misconceptions, particularly wrong ideas about our true nature, negating its false identification with the body and the external world. But misconceptions about the path also exist and can be significant obstacles to overcome along the way. Of course many of these same misconceptions can be found relative to any spiritual path, because all spiritual paths aim to take us to a higher state of consciousness, which can appeal to fantasy and escapism as well as to genuine aspiration. Yet as Advaita is the highest and most direct path this potential for distortion is even greater, like an ordinary climber’s fantasy to quickly scale the heights of Mount Everest.

Advaita is formless in nature and in practice, so there is much room for overestimating, if not exaggerating one’s attainments, and little objective to keep one grounded. Going all the way back to the Upanishads there are criticisms of practitioners who can brilliantly talk the Advaitic line but lack the realization to really back it up. Advaita, though referring to the Brahmic state beyond Maya, therefore, has its own glamour or Maya. The allure of a quick and direct path to becoming God and guru has a special appeal not only to the awakened soul but also to the unawakened ego that wants the glory of spiritual realization without undergoing any real toil or tapas in order to get there.

These usual misconceptions are getting further magnified as Advaita becomes popular in the West, which as a media dominated culture easily falls into stereotype, image production and fantasy-fulfillment. Just as Yoga has undergone many distortions in the West, which has reduced it largely to a physical asana practice, so too Advaita is often getting reduced to an instant enlightenment fad, to another system of personal empowerment or to another type of pop psychology.

An entire ‘neo-Advaitic’ movement has arisen reflecting not only traditional teachings but the demands of western culture. While this movement is arguably a good trend for the future and contains much that is positive in it, it is also a fertile ground for many distortions, which are likely to become more pronounced as the popular base of the movement expands.

The Advaitic path is rooted in a powerful and simple logic, which is not difficult to learn. “You are That”, “The Self is Everything”, “All is One”, and so on. We can easily confuse adapting this logic, which is not difficult, with the actual realization of the state of awareness behind it, which is something else altogether. We can answer all questions with “Who is asking the question?”, when it may be no more than a verbal exercise.

Faced with both old and new misconceptions, the Advaitic student today is in a difficult position to separate a genuine approach and real guidance from the bulk of superficial or misleading teachings, however well-worded, popular or pleasant in appearance these may appear to be.

Advaita and Vedanta

Advaita is primarily a term of Advaita Vedanta, the non-dualistic tradition of Vedanta. Though rooted in the Vedas, Upanishads and Gita, its most characteristic form occurs in the teachings of Shankaracharya (c. 500 AD), who put these Vedic teachings in a clear rational language that remains easily understandable to the present day. The basic language and logic of Shankara can be found behind most Advaitic teachings, even those who may not have studied Shankara directly. There are many specifically Advaitic texts from Shankara’s Upanishadic commentaries to more general works like Yoga Vasishta, Avadhuta Gita, Ashtavakra Samhita and Tripura Rahasya as part of an enormous literature, not only in Sanskrit but in all the dialects in India.

Similarly, there have been many great gurus in the tradition of Advaita Vedanta throughout the centuries. Most of the great gurus of modern India have been Advaitins including Vivekananda, Rama Tirtha, Shivananda, Chandrashekhar Saraswati of Kanchi, Ramana Maharshi and Anandamayi Ma. Most of the great gurus from India who brought Yoga to the West like Vivekananda, Yogananda, Satchitananda and Swami Rama, also taught Advaita Vedanta, if we really look at their teachings.

However, a recent trend has been to remove Advaita from Vedanta, as if it were a different or independent path, and not bring in the greater tradition of Vedanta. Though neo-Advaita usually bases itself on modern Advaita Vedantins like Ramana Maharshi or Nisargadatta, it usually leaves the Vedanta out of the term and neglects the teachings of other great modern Vedantins from Vivekananda to Dayananda, though their works are easily available in English and quite relevant to any Advaitic practice.

This ‘Advaita without Vedanta’ is particularly strange because many important ideas found in the neo-Advaita movement, like that a universal path of Self-knowledge, reflect the neo-Vedanta movement that was popular in the early twentieth century following the teachings of Ramakrishna and Vivekananda and have been echoed throughout the modern Vedanta movement.

Neo-Advaita and Ramana Maharshi

The teachings of Ramana Maharshi are often the starting point for neo-Advaitic teachers, though other influences also exist in the movement. However, instead of looking into the background and full scope of Ramana’s teachings, there is often only a focus only on those of his teachings that seem to promise quick realization for all.

Some neo-Advaitins even refer to Ramana’s teachings as if Ramana was a rebel or outside of any tradition, almost as if he invented Advaita himself. While Ramana based his teaching on his own direct realization, he frequently quoted from and recommended the reading of Advaitic texts, which he found represented the same teachings as those that arose from his own experience. This included not only the works of Shankara, the main traditional Advaitic teacher, but many other texts like Yoga Vasishta, Tripura Rahasya and Advaita Bodha Dipika.

Ramana did broaden out the traditional Advaitic path from its medieval monastic Hindu forms. Yet even in this regard he was continuing a reformation since Vivekananda who created a practical Vedanta or practical Advaita and taught it to all sincere seekers, not just to monastics.

Many students come to neo-Advaitic teachers because of Ramana’s influence, looking for another Ramana or for instruction into Ramana’s teaching, but apart from Ramana’s image used by the teacher, what they get may be something different. That someone may use the image of Ramana or quote from him, therefore, is no guarantee that their teaching is really the same.

Are There Prerequisites for Advaita?

One of the main areas of difference of opinion is relative to who can practice Advaita and to what degree? What are the prerequisites for Self-inquiry? Some people believe that Advaita has no prerequisites, but can be taken up by anyone, under any circumstances, regardless of their background or life-style. After all, Advaita is just teaching us to rest in our true nature, which is always there for everyone. Why should that rest on any outer aids or requirements? This is a particularly appealing idea in the age of democracy, when all people are supposed to be equal.

In much of neo-Advaita, the idea of prerequisites on the part of the student or the teacher is not discussed. Speaking to general audiences in the West, some neo-Advaitic teachers give the impression that one can practice Advaita along with an affluent life-style and little modification of one’s personal behavior. This is part of the trend of modern yogic teachings in the West that avoid any reference to asceticism or tapas as part of practice, which are not popular ideas in this materialistic age.

However, if we read traditional Advaitic texts, we get quite a different impression. The question of the aptitude or adhikara of the student is an important topic dealt with at the beginning of the teaching. The requirements can be quite stringent and daunting, if not downright discouraging. One should first renounce the world, practice brahmacharya, and gain proficiency in other yogas like Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga and Raja Yoga and so on (the sadhana-chatushtya). One can examine texts like the Vedanta Sara I.6-26 for a detailed description. While probably no one ever had all of these requirements before starting the practice of Self-inquiry, these at least do encourage humility, not only on the part of the student, but also on the part of the teacher who himself may not have all these requirements!

Ramana keeps the requirement for Advaita simple yet clear – a ripe mind, which is the essence of the whole thing, and encourages practice of the teaching without overestimating one’s readiness for it. Yet a ripe mind is not as easy as it sounds either.

Ramana defines this ripe mind as profound detachment and deep discrimination, above all a powerful aspiration for liberation from the body and the cycle of rebirth – not a mere mental interest but an unshakeable conviction going to the very root of our thoughts and feelings (note Ramana Gita VII. 8-11).

A ripe, pure or sattvic mind implies that rajas and tamas, the qualities of passion and ignorance, have been cleared not only from the mind but also from the body, to which the mind is connected in Vedic thought. Such a pure or ripe mind was rare even in classical India. In the modern world, in which our life-style and culture is dominated by rajas and tamas, it is indeed quite rare and certainly not to be expected.

To arrive at it, a dharmic life-style is necessary. This is similar to the Yoga Sutra prescription of the yamas and niyamas as prerequisites for Yoga practice. In this regard, Ramana particularly emphasized a sattvic vegetarian diet as a great aid to practice.

The problem is that many people take Ramana’s idea of a ripe mind superficially. It is not a prescription that anyone can approach or practice Advaita in any manner they like. Advaita does require considerable inner purity and self-discipline, developing which is an important aim of practice which should not be lightly set aside.

Is Advaita Against Other Yoga Practices?

A related misconception is that Advaita is against other spiritual and yogic practices like mantra, pranayama, puja and bhakti, which from its point of view are regarded as of little value and only serve to condition the mind further. Even a number of traditional Advaitic texts speak of setting all such other yogic practices aside as useless. Many neo-Advaitins emphasize such advanced teachings. They may tell even beginning students to give up all other practices and discourage them from doing mantras, pranayama or other yoga techniques. We could call this ‘Advaita without Yoga’.

Traditional Advaita, which Ramana echoed, states that advanced aspirants who are truly ready for a dedicated path of self-inquiry can discard other yogic practices if they are so inclined. But it also states that for gaining a ripe mind, developing proficiency in these preliminary practices is a good idea. Most people can benefit from at least some support practices, particularly beginners, even if their main focus is Self-inquiry. Note the Ramana Gita VII. 12-14 in this regard.

If we study traditional Advaita, we find that Yoga practices were regarded as the main tools for developing the ripe mind necessary for Advaita to really work. Many great Advaitins taught Yoga as well. Even Shankara taught Tantric Yoga in his teachings like Saundarya Lahiri and composed great devotional hymns to all the main Hindu Gods and Goddesses. This tradition of Yoga-Vedanta – using Yoga to create a ripe or sattvic mind, and using Advaita for the higher realization through it – has been the dominant approach in Vedanta found not only in the works of older gurus like Shankaracharya and Vidyaranaya, but in modern gurus like Vivekananda, Shivananda and Yogananda.

Ramana, though he emphasized Self-inquiry, never rejected the value of other yogic practices. He commonly extolled such practices as chanting the name of God, chanting Om and doing pranayama. He had regular Vedic chanting and pujas done at the ashram which continue today.

This traditional Advaitic view of different levels practice should not be confused with an approach that rejects all practices as useless. In this regard we can contrast traditional Advaita Vedanta, which Ramana followed, and the teachings of J. Krishnamurti, which is often the source of neo-Advaita’s rejection of support practices.

Advaitic aspirants may not be attracted to all such Yoga practices and need not be, but they should not therefore regard them as of no value or discourage others from doing them. Until the mind is fully ripe or sattvic, such practices have their value, though we should use them as a means to Self-inquiry, not in exclusion of it. Advaita without Yoga, like Advaita without Vedanta often leaves the student without the proper tools to aid them along their sometimes long and difficult path.

THE ADVAITIC GURU

Of course, the greatest possible distortions are relative to the Advaitic Guru. Since Advaita relies less on outer marks than other traditions, almost anyone can claim to be an Advaitic Guru, particularly once we have removed Advaita from any tradition of Vedanta or Yoga. In much of neo-Advaita, there is a rush to become gurus and give satsangs, even without much real study or practice. While certainly even a beginning student can teach the basics of Advaita for the benefit of others, to quickly set oneself up as a Self-realized guru raises a lot of questions. One can have an experience of the Self, while the full realization may yet be far away. Full Self-realization is neither easy nor common, under any circumstances.

Advaita does emphasize the advantage of instruction from a living Self-realized guru. Many people therefore think that they must have a living Self-realized guru or they can’t practice Self-inquiry. This is not the case either. If one has access to genuine teachings, like those of Ramana, and follows them with humility and self-discipline, one can progress far on the path, which will lead them to further teachers and teachings as needed. On the other hand, in the rush to get a living Self-realized guru, students may get misled by those who claim Self-realization but may not really have it. Such false gurus cannot lead students very far and may take them in a wrong direction altogether.

A related misconception is that Advaitic realization can only be gained as a direct transmission from a living teacher, as if Self-realization depended upon a physical proximity to one who has it. Practice may get reduced to hanging out around the so-called guru and waiting for his glance! The presence of a real sadhak does indeed aid one’s practice, but physical proximity to gurus is no substitute for one’s own inner practice. And physical proximity to those who don’t have true realization may not bring much of benefit at all.

If Self-realization were as easy as coming into physical proximity with the teacher, most of the thousands who visited Ramana would have already become Self-realized. If the teaching had to come from a living guru only, then no teachings would be preserved after the guru died as these would no longer be relevant. So the realization behind the guru and the depth of his teaching is more important than whether he is in a physical body or not. A great guru leaves teachings for many generations and his influence is not limited by the lifetime of his physical body. A lesser guru, on the other hand, does not have much real transformative influence even if we spend a lifetime around him.

In addition, true Advaitic gurus are not always easy to find, nor do they always make themselves prominent in the external world. Like Ramana, many great gurus are quiet, silent and withdrawn. We can best find them by karmic affinity from our own practice, not by external searching or running after personalities.

WHICH SELF IS BEING EXAMINATET?

Self-inquiry is an examination into our true nature, which is pure consciousness beyond body and mind. This is a very different process from psychological analysis, which is an inquiry into our personal, historical, ego-based individuality. Our true Self is our universal being, a consciousness present not only in humans but in animals, plants, the very Earth on which we live, the atmosphere, stars and planes of existence beyond the physical.

Another misconception in modern Advaita is turning Self-inquiry into an examination of the personal self, our fears and desires, and trying to make us feel better about it. Neo-Advaita in particular gets mixed up with western psychology and can get caught in examining the mind rather than going beyond the mind. Advaita is not about psychological happiness but about negating our psychology. Naturally some clarity about our psychology can be of initial help, but it is not the goal of practice.

FINDING ONE'S OWN PATH <3

The spiritual path is different for every individual. A true teacher teaches each student differently according to their unique nature. A true teacher will not necessarily teach Advaita to everyone, at all times or in the same manner. If we look at great gurus, their disciples are not simply imitations of them, but retain their own individuality. Note Ramana’s main disciples Muruganar and Ganapati Muni in this regard.

The West has a tendency to standardize, stereotype, mass-produce and even franchise teachings. The neo-Advaita movement, like the western Yoga movement, is affected by this cultural compulsion, and often gives the same teachings en masse. True Advaita is not a teaching than can be given uniformly to people of all temperaments. It is often best pursued in solitude, silence and retreat and can never become a thing of the marketplace.

Certainly Advaita Vedanta is bound to continue as an important influence in not only individual sadhana but also in world thought. But it has many depths and subtleties that require great concentration and dedication in order to understand. Our initial goal should be steadiness in practice along with equanimity of mind, even in the absence of any great dramatic results, not quick enlightenment in the absence of practice!

- image: autumn scene from Japan
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THE GURU-DISCIPLE RELATIONSHIP ... <3
From a genuine relationship to the display of cult-like behavior.
A Guru is seen as a spiritual Master. Spiritual Mastership requires knowledge of pure Awareness which is knowledge of God. A true Guru never represents the body that is seen by the disciple but the pure Awareness which is to be revealed within the disciple. Thus, being the Awareness within, the real Guru is always with the disciple and it is the job of any genuine Guru not to domin...
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Renate Ahluwalia updated the group photo in Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त. ... See MoreSee Less

Francesco Paramananda Russo, Parmila Singh and 7 others like this

Renate Ahluwaliaॐ नमो भगवते श्रीरमणाय ॥ ! <3 ॐ शान्तिः शान्तिः शान्तिः <3

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Renate Ahluwalia

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Eraawathi Atreya

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<3
Be attached to Him, who is without attachment. Hold on to that attachment.
Then only will you be able to leave other attachments.
~ Saint Thirvalluvar
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SHANKARA (ATMA BODHA )

SHANKARA (ATMA BODHA ) <3

Shankara’s date and place of birth remain controversial, but it is generally accepted that he was born into a family of the Nambudiri sect of Brahmins, at Kaladar on the coast of Malabar, India in 788 A.D. Early in his short life of only thirty two years, he learned the highest knowledge of Advaita Vedanta from his teacher, Govinda, a pupil of Gaudapada. He wrote numerous commentaries on earlier Vedantic scriptures such as the principal Upanishads, the Bhagavadgita, and the Vedanta Sutra. His own works, such as the Vivekachudamani, and the Atma Bodha,which is presented here, reveal his non­dual perspective clearly and directly.

***

1. This treatise on awakening to our real Self is composed for those who have all but lived out the consequences of past actions, have attained equanimity, have mastered their desires, and who seek final liberation.

2. Of all means, understanding alone can bring about
liberation; as without fire there can be no cooking, so without knowledge of the truth there can be no real emancipation.

3. Action cannot remove ignorance; but knowledge disperses it as light disperses darkness.

4. Atman, our real self, seems to be veiled by ignorance, but the moment ignorance is destroyed, our true nature shines forth, like the sun when clouds drift away.

5. After the mind, deluded by ignorance, has been purified by higher reasoning, that higher reasoning disappears, as the berry of the Kataka disappears after it has purified water.
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Rajeshwari DeviJai gurudev

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Rajeshwari Devi

Renate Ahluwalia<3

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Renate Ahluwalia

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Advaitic Sadhana - S.S. Cohen 
Chapter II: NECESSITY OF SADHANA: 
The unsteady mind has no knowledge of the Supreme; nor has he mediation. To the unmeditating there is no peace; and to the  unpeaceful how can there be happiness?

                                                                              - Bhagavad Gita II.66.

These lines are a philosophy of life in a nutshell. They guide him who desires to live in peace with the world and with himself,  as well as him who is bent upon taking the pilgrims staff in search of the truth absolute and the freedom for which his soul yearns. They tell the former that peace is unattainable without mental steadiness, and the latter that mind control through meditation is absolutely essential to attain that Knowledge which alone can give release.

The mind, which is the only instrument of knowledge, man possesses, is usually never at rest and too entangled in the object of desire, it perceives and in the duties, responsibilities and attachments, which these impose upon it, to know how to release itself from them. The help of the Master becomes necessary to show the way out of the sense mess and into the aloneness of the Being (kaivalya), of the pure mind itself, which is all purity and tranquility. This is the supreme knowledge to which the following lines refer:

I know this mighty Being, who shines effulgent like the Sun beyond darkness. One triumphs over death only by knowing Him. There is indeed no other way to Liberation.

                                             (SvetasvatAra Upanishad III, 8).

To triumph over death discipline of the mind (sadhana) is, therefore, necessary. As in deep sleep, the subject enjoys the massive bliss of kaivalya when he sees no sights, hears no sounds, and is completely free from thoughts, so much the yogi in the waking state  withdraw into kaivalya of himself through meditation to attain the knowledge of Being or the Self, which is the Supreme Liberation.
This method is called Jnana Maga (path of knowledge). In no system is the practice made so easy and safe as in this yoga, because, first, it is dialectical and, secondly, it is free from the DANGERS, which often result from misdirected practices which interfere with the natural functions of the body, or with super sensible forces lying beyond the control of the subject himself.

Advaitic Sadhana - S.S. Cohen
Chapter II: NECESSITY OF SADHANA:
The unsteady mind has no knowledge of the Supreme; nor has he mediation. To the unmeditating there is no peace; and to the unpeaceful how can there be happiness?

- Bhagavad Gita II.66.

These lines are a philosophy of life in a nutshell. They guide him who desires to live in peace with the world and with himself, as well as him who is bent upon taking the pilgrim's staff in search of the truth absolute and the freedom for which his soul yearns. They tell the former that peace is unattainable without mental steadiness, and the latter that mind control through meditation is absolutely essential to attain that Knowledge which alone can give release.

The mind, which is the only instrument of knowledge, man possesses, is usually never at rest and too entangled in the object of desire, it perceives and in the duties, responsibilities and attachments, which these impose upon it, to know how to release itself from them. The help of the Master becomes necessary to show the way out of the sense mess and into the aloneness of the Being (kaivalya), of the pure mind itself, which is all purity and tranquility. This is the supreme knowledge to which the following lines refer:

I know this mighty Being, who shines effulgent like the Sun beyond darkness. One triumphs over death only by knowing Him. There is indeed no other way to Liberation.

(SvetasvatAra Upanishad III, 8).

To 'triumph over death' discipline of the mind (sadhana) is, therefore, necessary. As in deep sleep, the subject enjoys the massive bliss of kaivalya when he sees no sights, hears no sounds, and is completely free from thoughts, so much the yogi in the waking state withdraw into kaivalya of himself through meditation to attain the knowledge of Being or the Self, which is the Supreme Liberation.
This method is called Jnana Maga (path of knowledge). In no system is the practice made so easy and safe as in this yoga, because, first, it is dialectical and, secondly, it is free from the DANGERS, which often result from misdirected practices which interfere with the natural functions of the body, or with super sensible forces lying beyond the control of the subject himself. <3
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THIS primordial ground is present in the mindstreams of all sentient beings, but it is tightly constricted by dualistic grasping; and it is regarded as external, firm, and solid. This is like water in its natural, fluid state freezing in a cold wind. It is due to dualistic grasping onto subjects and objects that the ground, which is naturally free, becomes frozen into the appearances of things.

~ Dudjom Lingpa

(Chamtrul Rinpoche’s monastery was the home to Dudjom Lingpa)

Renate Ahluwalia shared Chamtrul Rinpoche's post to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

THIS primordial ground is present in the mindstreams of all sentient beings, but it is tightly constricted by dualistic grasping; and it is regarded as external, firm, and solid. This is like water in its natural, fluid state freezing in a cold wind. It is due to dualistic grasping onto subjects and objects that the ground, which is naturally free, becomes frozen into the appearances of things.

~ Dudjom Lingpa

(Chamtrul Rinpoche’s monastery was the home to Dudjom Lingpa)
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This primordial ground is present in the mindstreams of all sentient beings, but it is tightly constricted by dualistic grasping; and it is regarded as external, firm, and solid. This is like water in its natural, fluid state freezing in a cold wind. It is due to dualistic grasping onto subjects and...

AS SOON AS YOU START TO TURN WITHIN, as soon as you begin to listen to the still small voice within you, as soon as you start to practice self-enquiry, your life begins to change drastically. You become happy. You no longer search for happiness, for you are beginning to realize that you cannot find it externally. You may appear to find it, but it does not last.

AS SOON AS YOU START TO TURN WITHIN, as soon as you begin to listen to the still small voice within you, as soon as you start to practice self-enquiry, your life begins to change drastically. You become happy. You no longer search for happiness, for you are beginning to realize that you cannot find it externally. You may appear to find it, but it does not last. <3
Robert Adams
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<3

ANECDOTES BY KAHLIL GIBRAN
Knowledge and Half Knowledge

Four frogs sat upon a log that lay floating on the edge of a river. Suddenly the log was caught by the current and swept slowly down the stream. The frogs were delighted and absorbed, for never before had they sailed.

At length the first frog spoke, and said, "This is indeed a most marvellous log. It moves as if alive. No such log was ever known before."

Then the second frog spoke, and said, "Nay, my friend, the log is like other logs, and does not move. It is the river that is walking to the sea, and carries us and the log with it."

And the third frog spoke, and said, "It is neither the log nor the river that moves. The moving is in our thinking. For without thought nothing moves."

And the three frogs began to wrangle about what was really moving. The quarrel grew hotter and louder, but they could not agree.

Then they turned to the fourth frog, who up to this time had been listening attentively but holding his peace, and they asked his opinion.

And the fourth frog said, "Each of you is right, and none of you is wrong. The moving is in the log and the water and our thinking also."

And the three frogs became very angry, for none of them was willing to admit that his was not the whole truth, and that the other two were not wholly wrong.

Then a strange thing happened. The three frogs got together and pushed the fourth frog off the log into the river.
[Kahlil Gibran]

The Pebble

When God threw me, a pebble, into this wondrous lake I disturbed its surface with countless circles. But when I reached the depths I became very still.
[Kahlil Gibran]

The Three Ants

Three ants met on the nose of a man who was lying asleep in the sun. And after they had saluted one another, each according to the custom of his tribe, they stood there conversing.

The first ant said, “These hills and plains are the most barren I have known. I have searched all day for a grain of some sort, and there is none to be found.” Said the second ant, “I too have found nothing, though I have visited every nook and glade. This is, I believe, what my people call the soft, moving land where nothing grows.” Then the third ant raised his head and said, “My friends, we are standing now on the nose of the Supreme Ant, the mighty and infinite Ant, whose body is so great that we cannot see it, whose shadow is so vast that we cannot trace it, whose voice is so loud that we cannot hear it; and He is omnipresent.”

When the third ant spoke thus the other ants looked at each other and laughed. At that moment the man moved and in his sleep raised his hand and scratched his nose, and the three ants were crushed.
[Kahlil Gibran]
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Krishan Kumar Dhamgreat post , Tnks for sharing <3

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Renate Ahluwalia---------------- <3

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Eraawathi AtreyaGreat... ...much gratitude...💜💜

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Rajesh Ojha❤❤

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Renate Ahluwalia shared Buddha Bless You's post to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

<3
Delight in meditation and solitude. Compose yourself, be happy. You are a seeker.
— The Buddha

Wishing everyone a Joyfilled week!
Buddha Bless You ___/\___
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Delight in meditation and solitude. Compose yourself, be happy. You are a seeker. — The Buddha Wishing everyone a Joyfilled week! Buddha Bless You ___/\___

The Kagyu Golden Rosary - Gampopa

Gampopa Sönam Rinchen was born in Nyal in central Tibet. His father was Nyiwa Sangye Gyalpo and mother was Shomo Zatse. He was named Dharma Drak.

MEDICAL TRAINING...

Renate Ahluwalia shared Devotees of the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa Ogyen Trinley Dorje's photo to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

The Kagyu Golden Rosary - Gampopa

Gampopa Sönam Rinchen was born in Nyal in central Tibet. His father was Nyiwa Sangye Gyalpo and mother was Shomo Zatse. He was named Dharma Drak.

MEDICAL TRAINING...
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The Kagyu Golden Rosary - Gampopa Gampopa Sönam Rinchen was born in Nyal in central Tibet. His father was Nyiwa Sangye Gyalpo and mother was Shomo Zatse. He was named Dharma Drak. MEDICAL TRAINING His father started his son’s education at the age of five. For over eight and one-half years, begi...

FORGIVNESS IS A GREAT POWER

FORGIVNESS IS A GREAT POWER <3
From The Mahabharata, Udyoga Parva Section XXXIII
Translated by Sri Kisari Mohan Ganguli

Addressing Dhritarashtra

Vidura said: There is one only defect in forgiving persons, and not another; that defect is that people take a forgiving person to be weak. That defect, however, should not be taken into consideration, for forgiveness is a great power. Forgiveness is a virtue of the weak, and an ornament of the strong. Forgiveness subdues (all) in this world; what is there that forgiveness cannot achieve? What can a wicked person do unto him who carries the sabre of forgiveness in his hand? Fire falling on the grassless ground is extinguished of itself. And unforgiving individual defiles himself with many enormities. Righteousness is the one highest good; and forgiveness is the one supreme peace; knowledge is one supreme contentment; and benevolence, one sole happiness.
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FORGIVNESS VERSUS MIGHT

FORGIVNESS VERSUS MIGHT <3
From The Mahabharata, Vana Parva, Section XXVII
Translated by Sri Kisari Mohan Ganguli

Addressing King Yudhishthira

Draupadi said: On this subject, the ancient story of the conversation between Prahlad and Vali, the son of Virochana is quoted as an example. One day Vali asked his grandfather Prahlad, the chief of the Asuras and the Danavas, possessed of great wisdom and well versed in the mysteries of the science of duty, saying. ‘O sire, is forgiveness meritorious or might (and energy) meritorous?

Thus asked by Vali, his wise grandfather, conversant with every conclusion, replied upon the whole subject unto his grandson who had sought at his hands the resolution of his doubts.

Prahlad said: Know O child, these two truths with certainty, viz., that might is not always meritorious and forgiveness also is not always meritorious. He that forgives always suffers many evils. Servants and strangers and enemies always disregard him. No creature ever bends down unto him. Therefore it is, O child, that the learned applaud not a constant habit of forgiveness.

The servants of an ever-forgiving person always disregard him, and contract numerous faults. These mean-minded men also seek to deprive him of his wealth. Vile souled servants also appropriate to themselves his vehicles and clothes and ornaments and apparel and beds and seats and food and drink and other articles of use. They do not also at the command of their master give unto others the things they are directed to give. Nor do they ever worship their master with that respect which is their master’s due. Disregard in this world is worse than death.

O child, sons and servants and attendants and even strangers speak harsh words unto the man who always forgives. Persons, disregarding the man of an ever-forgiving temper, even desire his wife, and his wife also becomes ready to act as she wills. And servants also that are ever fond of pleasure, if they do not receive even slight punishment from their master, contract all sorts of vices, and the wicked ever injure such a master. These and many other demerits attach to those that are ever forgiving!

Listen now, O son of Virochana, to the demerits of those that are never forgiving! The man of wrath who, surrounded by darkness, always inflicts, by help of his own energy, various kinds of punishment on persons whether they deserve them or not, is necessarily separated from his friends in consequence of that energy of his. Such a man is hated by both relatives and strangers. Such a man, because he insults others, suffers loss of wealth and reaps disregard and sorrow and hatred and confusion and enemies.

The man of wrath, in consequence of his ire, inflicts punishments on men and obtains (in return) harsh words. He is divested of his prosperity soon and even of life, not to say, of friends and relatives. He that puts forth his might both upon his benefactor and his foe, is an object of alarm to the world, like a snake that has taken shelter in a house, to the inmates thereof. What prosperity can he have who is an object of alarm to the world? People always do him an injury when they find an opportunity.

Therefore, should men never exhibit might in excess nor forgiveness on all occasions. One should put forth his might and show his forgiveness on proper occasions. He who becomes forgiving at the proper time and harsh and mighty also at the proper time, obtains happiness both in this world and the other.

I shall now indicate the occasions in detail, of forgiveness, as laid down by the learned, and which should ever be observed by all. Hearken unto me as I speak! He that has do thee a service, even if he is guilty of a grave wrong unto thee, recollecting his former service, should thou forgive that offender. Those also that have become offenders from ignorance and folly should be forgiven for learning and wisdom are not always easily attainable by man.

They that having offended thee knowingly, plead ignorance should be punished, even if their offences be trivial. Such crooked men should never be pardoned. The first offence of every creature should be forgiven. The second offence, however, should be punished, even if it be trivial. If, however, a person commits an offence unwillingly, it has been said that examining his plea well by a judicious enquiry, he should be pardoned. Humility may vanquish might, humility may vanquish weakness. There is nothing that humility may not accomplish. Therefore, humility is truly fiercer (than it seems)!

One should act with reference to place and time, taking note of his own might or weakness. Nothing can succeed that has been undertaken without reference to place and time. Therefore, do thou ever wait for place and time! Sometimes offenders should be forgiven from fear of the people. These have been declared to be times of forgiveness. And it has been said that on occasions besides these, might should be put forth against transgressors.

Draupadi continued: I therefore, regard, O king, that the time has come for thee to put forth thy might! Unto those Kurus the covetous sons of Dhritarashtra who injure us always, the present is not the time for forgiveness! It behoveth thee to put forth thy might. The humble and forgiving person is disregarded; while those that are fierce persecute others. He, indeed, is a king who hath recourse to both, each according to its time!
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Renate Ahluwalia shared Chamtrul Rinpoche's post to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

<3
Your Buddha nature is beyond the differences of culture and gender. It does not matter where you come from. It does not matter whether you are a woman or a man. You must always understand this. You must have confidence in the fact that in this life that you have now, you can become a great practitioner.

~ Chamtrul Rinpoche
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Your Buddha nature is beyond the differences of culture and gender. It does not matter where you come from. It does not matter whether you are a woman or a man. You must always understand this. You must have confidence in the fact that in this life that you have now, you can become a great practitio...

May the Divine light of Diwali shine with Joy, Peace, Happiness, Good Health and Prosperity, in your life!
✨✨✨HAPPY DIWALI ✨✨

Renate Ahluwalia shared Buddha Bless You's post to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

May the Divine light of Diwali shine with Joy, Peace, Happiness, Good Health and Prosperity, in your life!
✨✨✨HAPPY DIWALI ✨✨
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May the Divine light of Diwali shine with Joy, Peace, Happiness, Good Health and Prosperity, in your life! ✨✨✨HAPPY DIWALI ✨✨✨

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Renate Ahluwalia<3 <3 <3

3 days ago
Renate Ahluwalia

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16 grand arhats
Bakula

Born 70 years before Buddha, bakula was first an accomplished scholar and then lived as a wandering ascetic. One day, sitting on top of a mountain, he saw the Buddha move along the way. Fearing that he would not be able to reach him, he jumped directly from the mountain side, severely injuring him, but was saved from the injuries of the Buddha. He asked for the ordination and joined the sangha. After studying and practicing constantly, he was famous for having a deep faith and quickly reached the level of a arhat.

Renate Ahluwalia shared Thuk Je Che Tibet's post to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

16 grand arhats
Bakula

Born 70 years before Buddha, bakula was first an accomplished scholar and then lived as a wandering ascetic. One day, sitting on top of a mountain, he saw the Buddha move along the way. Fearing that he would not be able to reach him, he jumped directly from the mountain side, severely injuring him, but was saved from the injuries of the Buddha. He asked for the ordination and joined the sangha. After studying and practicing constantly, he was famous for having a deep faith and quickly reached the level of a arhat.
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16 Grandes Arhats Bakula Nacido 70 años antes que Buda, Bakula fue primero un erudito consumado y luego vivió como un asceta errante. Un día, sentado en lo alto de una montaña, vio pasar a Buda por el camino. Por temor de no ser capaz de alcanzarlo saltó directamente de la ladera de la montañ...

Renate Ahluwalia shared Treasury of Lives's photo to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त. ... See MoreSee Less

The First Karmapa, Dusum Khyenpa Chokyi Drakpa was born in Tresho, Kham, in 1110.

Renate Ahluwalia shared Swami Vivekananda : Our Eternal Spirit's post to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

<3
I look behind and after
And find that all is right,
In my deepest sorrows
There is a soul of light.

- Swami Vivekananda
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This poem forms a part of a letter that Swami Vivekananda wrote to Josephine MacLeod from Belur Math on December 26, 1900. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------...

<3
ONENESS is like the clear blue sky – everything arises, unfolds, and subsides within its all-compassionate love… Everything is an aspect of Oneness. And our quest to know this comes from ONENESS.
- Abhinavagupta
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<3
ASPIRATION FOR TIBET
A chain of fragrant flowers, these snow mountains are tranquil and fresh.
In a healing land where white incense rises sweet,
May the gracious beauty of luminous moonbeams,
Light of the spiritual and temporal worlds,
Conquer all strife, the darkness of the shadow side.

-- His Holiness the Seventeenth Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje
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Bio by Arthur Mandelbaum
https://treasuryoflives.org/…/view/Langdro-Konchok-Jungne/86
Langdro Lotsāwa Konchog Jungne (8th century), one of the twenty-five disciples of Padmasambhava, was also a minister to King Tri Songdetsen. He is said to have had the ability to hurl vajras through the air as though they were arrows. Konchok Jungne became an influential minister at the court of King Tri Songdetsen. Later on he became a monk and translator, taking the name Konchok Jungne, and received the Nyingtik teachings from Padmasambhava.

Renate Ahluwalia shared Treasury of Lives's post to the group: Advaita-Vedanta अद्वैत वेदान्त.

Bio by Arthur Mandelbaum
treasuryoflives.org/…/view/Langdro-Konchok-Jungne/86
Langdro Lotsāwa Konchog Jungne (8th century), one of the twenty-five disciples of Padmasambhava, was also a minister to King Tri Songdetsen. He is said to have had the ability to hurl vajras through the air as though they were arrows. Konchok Jungne became an influential minister at the court of King Tri Songdetsen. Later on he became a monk and translator, taking the name Konchok Jungne, and received the Nyingtik teachings from Padmasambhava.
... See MoreSee Less

Bio by Arthur Mandelbaum treasuryoflives.org/biographies/view/Langdro-Konchok-Jungne/86 Langdro Lotsāwa Konchog Jungne (8th century), one of the twenty-five disciples of Padmasambhava, was also a minister to King Tri Songdetsen. He is said to have had the ability to hurl vajras through the ...

Madam Saroja Ramanujam says:
16 hrs ·
The implication behind the story of Ajamila

Ajamila who was hearing the conversation between the men of Yama and those of the Lord was surprised when the former disappeared and tried to speak to the latter when they also disappeared.

Then Ajamila was struck with remorse over his conduct and turned a new leaf and renounced the world. He went to the banks of Ganges and through yoga attained freedom from bondage. He saw the same divine personalities at the end of his life and shed his mortal coil in the river and went to vaikunta-Bhagavatham skandha 6 chapter 3- slokas 39 to 44
The implication of the story is deeper than it looks. This should not be misunderstood as whatever kind of life one leads it is enough if one says the name of the Lord at the time of death and all his sins get absolved.

It is true that if one says the name of the Lord even unaware it will destroy the sins like the nectar taken without knowing what it creates well-being. But to say that needs poorvapunya.
A man who was about to die was told to utter the Rama naama but he could not do it. Then someone pointed at his last son who was named Rama and asked him who was that and the man said that he was his last sin and his life ended.
Ajamila had the punya to be able to utter the name of the Lord and at that time all his bad karma was exhausted and good karma started to give the result. That was because he led a pure life before his transition
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To be free from bondage the wise person must practise discrimination between One-Self and the ego-self. By that alone you will become full of joy, recognising Self as Pure Being, Consciousness and Bliss.

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#valmikijayanti2017 Do you know there is a 1300 years old temple for Maharishi Valmiki in Chennai? Today, October 5, 2017, Thursday is #Valmiki Jayanti. #ValmikiJayanti falls on Purattasi Pournami . Maharishi Valmiki is a poet of renown and is the author of the evergreen epic "#Ramayana". He ha...

The future religions can only be.....

Nithya Sarvamangalananda shared Paramahamsa Nithyananda's post to the group: Advaita.

The future religions can only be.....
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"By killing and conquering, spreading a religion is outdated system. After this information technology, only contributing religions are going to be accepted by the next generation." #ParamahamsaNithyananda

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Kailashnath SanatanaSex charlatan guru.

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Virtue and vice, pleasure and pain, are of the mind, not of you, O all-pervading one. You are neither doer nor enjoyer. Verily you are ever free. धर्माधर्मौ सुखं दुःखं मानसानि न ते विभो । न कर्तासि न भोक्...

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RESPONSE TO WELCOME At the World's Parliament of Religions, Chicago 11th September, 1893 Sisters and Brothers of America, It fills my heart with joy unspeakable to rise in response to the warm and cordial welcome which you have given us. I thank you in the name of the most ancient order of monks...

Question 10. How will the mind become quiescent [still]?

By the inquiry ‘Who am I?’. The thought ‘Who am I?’ will destroy all other thoughts, and like the stick used for stirring the burning pyre [funeral fire], it will itself in the end get destroyed. Then, there will arise Self-realisation.

From “Nan Yar - Who Am I?“ - Ramana Maharshi

John David shared Open Sky Press's post to the group: Advaita.

Question 10. How will the mind become quiescent [still]?

By the inquiry ‘Who am I?’. The thought ‘Who am I?’ will destroy all other thoughts, and like the stick used for stirring the burning pyre [funeral fire], it will itself in the end get destroyed. Then, there will arise Self-realisation.

From “Nan Yar - Who Am I?“ - Ramana Maharshi
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Question 10. How will the mind become quiescent [still]? By the inquiry ‘Who am I?’. The thought ‘Who am I?’ will destroy all other thoughts, and like the stick used for stirring the burning pyre [funeral fire], it will itself in the end get destroyed. Then, there will arise Self-realisatio...

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Gopal NarayananUltimate knowledge

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Introduction to Vedanta
The publisher is offering again a free promotion for the Kindle version of the book.
Introduction to Vedanta.
Start date: Oct 13
End Date: Oct 15 (for a total of 3 days)
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Introduction to Vedanta – By Dr. K. Sadananda
<https://www.amazon.com/dp/0999170406/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1500425363&sr=1-2&keywords=introduction+to+vedanta>
This book starts with the fundamental human problems and questions and search for happiness, and introduces the philosophy behind the spirituality of the many Upanishads and the Bhagavad Gita, and provides brief quotes from them. It goes on to explain the nature of the mind, its classification, and describes what this “I” is. In the process, it also explains the errors in perception, what is real and what is unreal, and the nature of consciousness and ultimate reality. A brief list of materials for further exploration appears at the end of the book.
-------------------
About the Author
Dr. K. Sadananda is a Materials Scientist by profession, and worked at United States Naval Research Laboratory as Head of Deformation and Fracture, published extensively in Scientific Journals and received many awards. He retired in 2005 and now works as a private consultant in the United States for six months of the year, and spends the rest of his time in India. He was also a visiting professor at Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai, India. He is a disciple of Swami Chinmayananda, was a founding trustee of the Chinmaya Mission’s Washington Regional Center as well as the Siva Vishnu Temple in Lahnam, Maryland, USA. He served as Secretary and Treasurer of SEVA, Inc., a philanthropic organization formed around 1980 to fund projects in India and elsewhere. In 1988, Swami Chinmayananda asked Dr. Sadananda to start teaching Vedanta in Virginia, and he became a formal Acharya or spiritual teacher of Chinmaya Mission in 1997. While in India, Dr. Sadananda works on webcasting of Vedanta topics for Advaita Academy, and while in the USA, he teaches Vedanta classes and conducts spiritual camps for Chinmaya Mission. His audio talks are available at Chinmaya Mission Washington Regional Center website and video talks are available on YouTube under Acharya Sadaji. He is one of the founder-moderators of the Advaitin mailing list, where extensive discussions on Advaita are being conducted. He is married to Mrinalini Sadananda, who is a well-known Kuchpudi dancer and Choreographer.
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Meeting John David
Arunachala India Pilgrimage Retreat, 6-27 January 2018

ONLY 2 DAYS LEFT - Early bird offer ends this Sunday

The retreat provides an unique opportunity to experience the ancient spiritual wisdom of India in a contemporary setting and in the presence of a living master, who can guide you to fall deeper into your own being.

"Love is not a feeling, it is the essence of who you are." John David

More information:
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Arunachala India Pilgrimage Retreat, 6-27 January 2018 The retreat provides an unique opportunity to experience the ancient spiritual wisdom of India in a contemporary setting and in the presence of a living master, who can guide you to fall deeper into your own being. "Love is not a feeling, it i...

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#ekadashi #Ramaekadashi2017 #ekadashivrata ரமா ஏகாதசி - What is the merit of observing Rama Ekadashi Rama Ekadashi falls on October 15, 2017, Sunday Shobana, the son- in- law of Muchakunda (a famous king) got a lustrous kingdom due to his observing Rama Ekadashi. What is the sto...

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Upadesha Saram - Vedanta Retreat in Tiruvannamalai

Upadesha Saram ist ein Text geschrieben von Ramana Marharshi. Es ist ein einfacher und sehr poetischer Text bestehend aus 30 Versen.

Ramana Maharshi beschloss bereits als Junge sich dem zu widmen, was wesentlich ist. Während einer Englischarbeit entschloss er die Schule, die Verwandtschaft und sein Leben hinter sich zu lassen und sich ganz Gott zu widmen.

Dieser Entschluss führte ihn zum heiligen Berg Arunachala. Viele Jahre verbrachte er schweigend in den Höhlen des Berges. Später gründete er zu Füßen des Arunachalas seinen berühmten Ashram.

Upadesha Saram geht als Geschichte auf Lord Shiva zurück. Dieser befiehlt den Menschen nicht die Sklaven des Systems zu sein. Sie sollen aufstehen und für das kämfen, was sich durch jeden Menschen verwirklichen möchte: Glückseligkeit und Fülle als Ausdruck der intrinsischen Natur.

Upadesha Saram beschreibt als Text die Essenz der Upanishaden und des Vedanta. Wir alle suchen Befreiung von emotionalen Begrenzungen und Glückseligkeit als Ausdruck des Selbst.

Der Text beschreibt auch die Funktionen von Karma / Handlung und Bhakti /Hingabe; Handlungen können nicht in die Erkenntnis der letzten Wirklichkeit führen. Sie schaffen jedoch einen fruchtbaren Boden, ohne dem die Erkenntnis der letzten Wirklichkeit nicht möglich ist.

Das Retreat findet in Tiruvannamalai statt. Der heilige Berg und der indische gelebte Alltag erleichtern das Verständnis des Textes.

Das Retreat vermittelt auch eine Einführung in die Methden des Teaching der Vedanta. Wir cahnten die Sanskritmantren und unterrichten die Bedeutung.

Jeder Teilnehmer sorgt selbst für Flug, Unterkunft und Verpflegung. Das Retreat findet täglich an einem ausgewählten Ort in Tiru statt. Wir treffen uns täglich zu den verabredeten Zeiten.

www.xmoves.de/termin/vedanta-retreat-indien/
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#happydhanteras #Dhanteras2017 #diwali2017 Happy Dhanteras! Diwali is celebrated as a five-day festival in northern and western parts of India. Diwali starts with Dhanteras on the first day, Dhanteras is considered as the birthday of Mahalakshmi, the day when she was churned out of the Ocean of ...

Sundara khanda
2nd Talk – Part II

The third obstacle that Hanuman encounters is Simhika Raakshasi. She represents the invisible obstacles, that are, the source of the obstacles that are not directly evident. The seeker is drawn away from the journey. The passions that are hidden, spring forth and force us down from our path. Sometimes look small initially, but they become bigger and bigger if we indulge in them. These passions detour us from our path. We get trapped. Simhika catches the shadow. Shadows are dark, representing the dark side of our personality. Most important among them is jealousy. When jealousy is there, I only see the dark side of the other person. I magnify their mistakes and undermine or see the dark side of their good deeds too. We start finding faults in others rather than paying attention to the good side of the people. Once Krishna asked Dhrmaraja to find bad people in this earth and at the same time asked Duryodhana to find good people on this earth. Both came back, and Dharmaraja said he could not find any bad people while Duryodhana said he could not find any good people.
We project our own values on others. Hanuman once recognized the problem immediately got rid of the problem giving a big blow. In essence, once we discover the dark side in our personality we have to stop immediately and get rid of those thoughts and see the good side. We do not encourage these negative thoughts. This is a part of our saadhana. The negatives are those that cause deviation from our path and disturb our peace of mind. We should not encourage those thoughts. The mind has to be constantly vigilant and awake to ensure we do not entertain such thoughts. For example, jealousy can be eliminated with love. How do you love a person who is Jealous? One way is to see the presence of the Lord. If Lord could stay in his heart without complaining, we have no business to complain. Thus three obstacles were pointed in the path of a seeker – the first represents satva, the second rajas, and the third tamas. These are representative obstacles that one finds in one’s inward journey to reach the highest reality.

Hanuman sees the City Lanka. Lanka has been described as the golden city. One finds the descriptions of three cities in Ramayana; janaka puri, ayodhya and Lanka. The first one represents the jnaana bhuumi, the second the yoga bhuumi and the third the bhoga bhuumi, saatvic, rajasic and tamasic nature. The City is known by the ruler. King Janaka is the embodiment of knowledge, Dasharatha the embodiment of bhakti, and Ravana the embodiment of lust. Thus the king sets the direction for the citizens and becomes an example for others to follow – ‘yathaa raajaa thathaa prajaa’, as the king, so are the people. Lanka city is not polluted since there were no manufacturing industries there. Everything is stolen from other places. All the riches are stolen from other places. Such a kingdom ultimately will perish. Ravana means the one who makes everyone to cry, by stealing everything including ladies, from other worlds.

Lanka security is very tight. Hanuman has to contemplate in terms of how to penetrate the enemy’s fort. It is said there are three types of common people in the world. 1) one who thinks but does not act 2) one who acts without thinking and 3) one who neither thinks nor acts. Hanuman does not belong to any one of the three characters. He thinks and then acts. Hanuman thinks that by becoming very small, he can escape the scrutiny of the Immigration Officer.

However, the immigration & security officer is Lankhini, and she is very clever and vigilant. She stops Hanuman before he enters the city. Hanuman hits her hard and Lankhini falls down throwing up blood. She gets up and expresses thanks to Hanuman for his ‘sat sangh’ or for his blessings, as she recollects what Brahmaji told here in the past. She says her duty to protect Lanka is over as per Brahmaji, when a monkey who is Rama’s servant hits her hard her obligation to serve Lanka is over. She says Hanuman, ‘you can go inside the court and the days of Ravana’s survival can be counted’.

Since she had sat-sangh, she is going to Heaven which she calls it as apavarga. Parvarga involves the five letters pa pha ba bha ma – pa stands for paapam or sins, pha stands for phalam or karma phalam fruits of the results of past actions, good or bad, ba stands for bandhan or bondage and bha stands for bhayam or fear, ma stands for maraNam or death. Apavarga means that which is the opposite of pavarga. Hence, it means freedom from all limitations. Lankhini got solvation because of the association with Hanuman. Lot of blood came out when Hanuman hit her. It Is the blood of the mind or impurities in the mind and stands for virakti or dispassion (raktam means blood). Shankara says in Bhajagovindam about value of sat-sangh (association with the good)–

sat sangatve nissagatvam, nissagatve nirmohatvam,
nirmohatve nischala tatvam, nischala tatve jeevan muktaH||

as the glory of sat sangh. By sat sangh one get nissangh – that is dispassion or detachment, and with detachment one gets nirmohatvam or loses one’s delusion, and when delusion is gone the mind becomes calm and serene – nischala tatvam, and when the mind is calm and serene and knowledge will sink in and one attains the liberation.
End of the second talk.

Hari Om!

Sadananda
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Sundara Khanda of Ramayan

This write-up is somewhat based on the discourses by Swami Advaitananda, at 2017 Chinmaya Maha Samadhi Camp held in Chicago July 29 – Aug. 3rd.

IIIrd Talk: Part 1

From Hanuman’s journey towards Seeta, we can learn many things. First, Hanuman does lot of thinking before he acts. That is called vichaara. This word, vichaara, comes many times in the Sundarakhanda. It is not just thinking but correct thinking. Bondage is lack of proper thinking. Everyone is in search of happiness – but many go after what is preyas (that which is pleasarable) than what is shreyas (that which is ultimately good. In kathopanishad the teacher, Yama, points out to the student, Nachiketas, that there are two pursuits – one is path of indulgence called preyas and the other is path of evolution called Shreyas, and only unintelligent ones go after the path of indulgence while those who have discriminative intellect goes for the path of evolution or shreyas. In kathopanishad the teacher says –
shreyasch preyascha manushyametat
tou sampareetya vivinakti dheeraH|
shreyohi dheerobhi preyaso vRiNeete
preyo mando yogashemaad vRineete||

The two paths – path of evolution and path of indulgence, both choices one has at any time. The intelligent one, after proper thinking, selects the path of evolution over the path of indulgence. The ignorant ones go after the path of indulgence to find happiness.

In Geeta also, Arjuna asks Krishna – I do not know what the proper course of action that I should take. I surrender myself to you, please guide me to that path which is definitely that of Shreyas – yat shreyaschan nischitam bruuhi tanve.

Hanuman follows the path of shreyas after deep thinking, as he is in search of Seeta, who stands for peace. Action is gross while thinking is subtle. From path of action, we move to the path of contemplation. Thinking is more difficult or to say correctly the proper thinking is difficult. We have to train our minds to think properly. Education should involve not just thinking but how to think correctly, by asking right questions. That is thinking on the basis of knowledge – which Vedanta calls it as mananam, that is required after receiving the teachings by listening to the teacher. It emphasizes vichaara – or an inquiry – Vedanta says freedom from limitations comes only after proper inquiry, tat vijnaasasva – enquire about the nature of absolute truth by negating what is false. sa vijneyaH – it has to be enquired. Vichaara to aachaara action should come after proper inquiry. One thinks first before one speaks, and does what is correct after thinking – manasaa, vaachaa, karmanaa. If these three things are proper then the journey will be smooth and fruitful. By wrong thinking, we commit wrong actions. If we do not know how to think, it is better to get guidance from the wise or a teacher. Meditation is directing the thoughts towards the higher or towards the goal.

Mind entertains numerous thoughts. It is said it can think up to 16000 thoughts per minute. If all the thoughts are directed towards the Lord, then it is like 16000 thoughts centered on the Lord. It is like raasa leela where each thought is symbolized as gopi. In the Sri Krishna KarnamRitam, Leelasuka says –
anganaa manganaa mantare maadhavaH
maadhavam maadhavam cha antareraanaanganaa|
ittamaakalpite manDale madhyagaH
sanjagou veNunaa devakee nandanaH|| II-35

Leelasuka describes the raasa leela – It says between gopi and gopi there is Krishna. Slowly, the attention is shifted to Krishna. Hence he says between Krishna and Krishna there is a gopi. As the raasa Leela progresses all the gopies are dancing around with Krishna remaining at the center playing his flute. Gopi stands for a thought. Between each thought, there is Krishna – a silence between the thoughts where consciousness alone is there without thoughts. Initially, the seeker’s attention is more on the thoughts than the silence between the thoughts. As meditation progress, his attention shifts to the silence in between the thoughts. Ultimately full attention is on the Lord, the pure consciousness to whose tune the thoughts are dancing around. Krishna is married to 16000 wives. Interestingly, in the 108 names of the Lord, one name is anaadi brahmachaarine namaH – I am prostrating to the one who is the eternal bachelor. In spite all the gopies dancing around, Krishna remains unattached in the middle, playing His divine music unperturbed by the dance of life around. This is what inquiry of absolute truth involves abiding in the self that is unperturbed by the multitude of the creation, sustenance, and dissolution that is taking place. All thoughts are wedded to Him, the absolute consciousness – yet consciousness has nothing to do with any thoughts – anaadi brahmachaariNe namaH.

To be continued

Hari Om!

Sadananda
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#thulasnanan2017dates #thulasnanam # KadaiMuzhuku Thula Snanam has begun! Thula snanam begins on October 18, Wednesday (the first day of Aippasi month) and ends on November 16 Thursday (the first day of Karthigai month). Having a dip in the river Cauveri during Aippasi (Tula month) is considere...

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Auf vielfachen Wunsch biete ich wieder eine Familienaufstellung an.
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SATSANG WITH LUIS DE SANTIAGO Luis is a disciple and friend of Robert Adams Dublin 1 of Setember 2017 youtu.be/oxHYbXIVK54

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Just for half of a second do not think Do it now ! When you still all activities, without doing anything, without thinking any thought - when you do not stir any thought from the mind ground, without moving, without moving the mind, without starting a single thought - in an instant of time you are ...

Girija Perla, Chinmayi Devi and 4 others like this

Chandi DeviHalf of a half second, even, as Papaji said!!!

7 months ago   ·  2

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Chandi Devi

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No head is needed to speak of Love, only Heart. In this Heart there is no need for maps to get Home. ~ Sri Poonjaji 'Papaji'

Hansa Natola shared Papaji Satsang Bhavan's post to the group: I Love Papaji Videos.

Jai Gurudev...
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Purpose of all the practices, methods, whatsoever, is silence. Silence is your real nature and without silence you cannot be at peace. Whatever you do, any kind of activity, on the ground, on the base of that activity, if you see, it is silence. Unless you are silent, you cannot activate yourse...

Hansa Natola shared Papaji Satsang Bhavan's post to the group: I Love Papaji Videos.

Om Sadguru Dev...
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Fear of death and how to get rid of it. All men and animals are always, are afraid of death. Everybody is afraid of death, and whosoever is afraid of death cannot avoid his next birth. And if you remove this fear you cannot have the next birth either, that means you become liberated while yet ali...

Hansa Natola shared Papaji Satsang Bhavan's post to the group: I Love Papaji Videos.

Om Shanti Shanti Shanti...
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Behold the Inner Flame, eternally ablaze within the cave of your own heart and in the hearts of all beings. There could be three prescribed methods for it. Number one: absolute dedication for it. Number two: completely abandon all the desires which you have hitherto, opted for, and have not g...

Dharma Abeles, Janie Bishop and 1 other like this

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Raman Pietro CrivelliGrazie Hansa

6 months ago
Raman Pietro Crivelli

Janie BishopThank you . ..especially touching as my name Shamo means Flame

6 months ago
Janie Bishop

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Om Sadguru Dev...
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Whatever is good, whatever gives you happiness, whatever gives you Eternal Peace, follow it. To lose peace at the cost of anything else is not wise. You can do away with your kingdom and all the rest. If you have peace of mind, you are the emperor of the universe. So, don't lose peace. How to w...

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Buddham sharanam gacchami
Dhammam sharanam gacchami
Sangham sharanam gacchami
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Blessed Vesak - Buddha Purnima! Celebrating the birth, enlightenment and the Mahasamadhi of Gautama Buddha and the recognition of the Buddha Nature within our own hearts. Hari Om Tat Sat

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Om Tat Sat
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TOTAL WATCHFULNESS You need only absolute, 100 percent, total watchfulness. When something is going you must be totally alert to absorb it, what is in front of you, then it happens at once. But two swords cannot be kept in one sheath, that’s how they say. You can’t have your old habits toget...

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Kalindi Magdalena MilesI remember that <3 thank you for posting <3

5 months ago   ·  1
Kalindi Magdalena Miles

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'Have you seen God?' I asked. 'And if you have, can you enable me to see him? I am willing to pay any price, even my life, but your part of the bargain is that you must show me God.' 'No,' Ramana Maharshi answered. 'I cannot show you God or enable you to see God because God is not an object that ca...

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* * * Grace * * * The Grace of Self gives rise to the desire for Freedom. The Grace of God brings you to the Guru. The Grace of the Guru removes all doubts and leaves only Freedom. "I want to be free" is the first Grace. It is Freedom itself calling you. This desire will take you to where it rise...

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You can't seek it because there is nothing to seek. Nothing to attain. When you give up this search and also concept of attainment or regain and then it is already there and you will see that it was there. Few will know it because everybody wants to do something. And by doing something, it's not ...

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Lin BellLove this one - thanks for posting xx

4 months ago
Lin Bell

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Papaji Ki Jai Ho!!

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Papaji Ki Jai Ho!!
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Om Sadguru Dev... This Sunday is the full moon dedicated to the Guru (Guru Purnima). When Papaji was still in the body, there would be a big celebratiion in Satsang Bhavan and devotees would sing and dance in gratitude to Papaji. In keeping with the tradition we celebrate Guru Purnima throughout ...

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Joyce ArrastiaOh I wish I could be there!

4 months ago
Joyce Arrastia

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John Midgley shared Sri Poonjaji 'Papaji''s Satguru Papaji to the group: I Love Papaji Videos.

Sri Poonjaji 'Papaji'
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Satguru Papaji

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Om Tat Sat
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Keep your head outside the hall and then listen. Don’t try to understand what is been spoken. You will try to understand with the mind and ego will rise and ego will absorb all the teaching. And you, “Oh I understood.” That’s all. Don’t try to understand. Let it go right at the bulls ey...

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